HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » The DU Lounge (Forum) » For My 80,000th Post: Aer...
Introducing Discussionist: A new forum by the creators of DU

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 08:12 PM

For My 80,000th Post: Aeroplane In A Bottle....



This is about my favorite of the models I built last year.

It is a Vikers Vimy trainer ( technically 'Vimy, Re-Conditioned, School' ), operating at No.4 Flying Training School at Abu Sueir, Egypt, circa 1930.

The model is in 1/72 scale ( six feet to the inch ). It began as a kit ( originally produced by the old FROG company ), and was extensively re-worked, first for basic accuracy and surface appearance, and then for replication of a late service School version, which had a different nose from the original bomber configuration, and radial motors ( and attendant items ) on bare tube bearers and modified inter-plane struts. The basic pieces of the motors ( cylinders and crank-cases ) were stripped from other kits, but about a hundred sixty extra bits were added to each motor in the course of detailing them. Wife very kindly laid out and printed up the serial number decals for me





The Vimy was designed as a long-range night bomber late in the Great War. Many were ordered, but only three had been delivered by the Armistice, and most of the contracts accordingly were cancelled. The type saw most of its operational service with squadrons based in Egypt as part of the Suez garrison in the early twenties. It became the standard multi-engine trainer for the Royal Air Force by the middle of that decade. Air crew trained at Abu Sueir mostly went on to fly troop transports in the Middle East and India. Starting late in 1927, Vimy trainers going in for over-haul or repair had their original Rolls-Royce Eagle V-12 motors replaced with radial Jupiter or Jaguar motors. For some reason, Jupiters were allotted to machines in England, and Jaguars to machines in Egypt. The last serving example of the type was retired in 1933, at Abu Sueir.



74 replies, 8276 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 74 replies Author Time Post
Reply For My 80,000th Post: Aeroplane In A Bottle.... (Original post)
The Magistrate Feb 2013 OP
CaliforniaPeggy Feb 2013 #1
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #2
drm604 Feb 2013 #3
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #6
drm604 Feb 2013 #7
union_maid Feb 2013 #4
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #5
Cooley Hurd Feb 2013 #8
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #12
Cooley Hurd Feb 2013 #18
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #19
Skinner Feb 2013 #9
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #13
hunter Feb 2013 #10
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #14
bluedigger Feb 2013 #11
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #16
Blue_Tires Feb 2013 #15
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #24
FogerRox Feb 2013 #37
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #41
FogerRox Feb 2013 #43
Mopar151 Feb 2013 #17
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #25
awoke_in_2003 Feb 2013 #20
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #31
GoneOffShore Feb 2013 #21
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #30
Raven Feb 2013 #22
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #29
CrazyOrangeCat Feb 2013 #23
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #28
CrazyOrangeCat Feb 2013 #42
tclambert Feb 2013 #26
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #27
tclambert Mar 2013 #47
The Magistrate Mar 2013 #48
FogerRox Feb 2013 #32
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #33
FogerRox Feb 2013 #36
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #38
FogerRox Feb 2013 #44
monmouth3 Feb 2013 #34
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #39
westerebus Mar 2013 #70
DollarBillHines Feb 2013 #35
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #40
ConcernedCanuk Feb 2013 #45
The Magistrate Mar 2013 #46
Ikonoklast Mar 2013 #49
The Magistrate Mar 2013 #50
hrmjustin Mar 2013 #51
The Magistrate Mar 2013 #54
Spitfire of ATJ Mar 2013 #52
The Magistrate Mar 2013 #55
Spitfire of ATJ Mar 2013 #57
The Magistrate Mar 2013 #58
Spitfire of ATJ Mar 2013 #59
The Magistrate Mar 2013 #60
Spitfire of ATJ Mar 2013 #61
The Magistrate Mar 2013 #62
Spitfire of ATJ Mar 2013 #63
question everything Mar 2013 #53
The Magistrate Mar 2013 #56
LongTomH Mar 2013 #64
The Magistrate Mar 2013 #66
Frosty1 Mar 2013 #65
The Magistrate Mar 2013 #68
Demo_Chris Mar 2013 #67
The Magistrate Mar 2013 #69
Loki Mar 2013 #71
The Magistrate Mar 2013 #72
colorado_ufo Mar 2013 #73
The Magistrate Mar 2013 #74

Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 08:17 PM

1. Dear Magistrate! Congratulations on your achievements, both on DU and with your airplane!

That is a most impressive and highly detailed work. You must have oceans of patience for having done this. It is amazing.

And thank you for your contributions to the sanity of DU. Your posts are so well-thought out and clearly intelligent as to boggle any lesser mind, including mine!

I hope to read many, many more...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to CaliforniaPeggy (Reply #1)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 08:45 PM

2. Thank You For Your Kind Words, Ma'am

This one did indeed require more than the usual measure of patience and diligence.

It has been quite a while since I joined up here, about eleven and a half years. I still feel like something of a 'new boy' however, since there were so many here already when i signed up.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 08:47 PM

3. From the thread title, I expected it to be in a bottle.

You know...

Ship in a bottle

Aeroplane in a bottle



In any case, nice job!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to drm604 (Reply #3)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 09:32 PM

6. This One, Sir, I Doubt Would Fit Even In A Five-Gallon Jug

Wife did once photo-shop a bottle over one of my models, to make an honest man of me in my jest, but it has been a while since I could find the thing....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Reply #6)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 09:35 PM

7. Yes, but I hadn't seen the plane, sir, until I opened the thread.

Your title gives the impression that it's in a bottle.

No big deal, I was just curious why.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 08:56 PM

4. Very impressive!

Both the plane and the post count. I'm sure I have only read a fraction of your 80,000, but I've appreciated every one, dear Magistrate. You are the as vital to the core of DU as any Admin.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to union_maid (Reply #4)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 09:29 PM

5. Thank You Very Much, Ma'am

This is one of the few sites I frequent on the web; I like it a lot.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 06:50 AM

8. Nice! Alcock and Brown would be pleased!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Cooley Hurd (Reply #8)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 11:43 AM

12. That was Quite A Flight, Sir, And Not So Well Remembered As It Deserves

The 'New Yorker' recently published a lightly fictionalized story depicting it, which was very well written.

The Vimy was employed for a number of record-setting flights shortly after the war: it had an unusual ability to get weight aloft which commended it to the purpose.

The kit I used here was originally meant to replicate Alcock's and Brown's 'Trans-Atlantic Vimy', and a lot of the work I had to put in in correcting the kit owed to this. There were a lot of differences between their aeroplane and a standard service Vimy.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Reply #12)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 12:48 PM

18. If you ask anyone "who first flew non-stop across the Atlantic?"...

...you get the standard, but wrong, answer.."Lindbergh!"

Even though the first aviators to cross the Atlantic was the US Navy crew of the seaplane NC-4, they did it in stages (it took 19 days), and they had the added benefit of doing it in a seaplane. On the other hand, if A&B's Vimy gave out, they didn't have the luxury of merely setting it down in the North Atlantic and waiting for help. THAT makes their trip that much more impressive.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Cooley Hurd (Reply #18)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 01:31 PM

19. Oe Of the Great French Fighting Pilots, Sir, Charles Nungesser

Died in an attempt to fly the Atlantic just a couple of weeks before Lindbergh's flight.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 10:12 AM

9. Very cool.

Congrats on 80,000, sir.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Skinner (Reply #9)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 11:45 AM

13. Thank You, Sir

I appreciate your comment very much.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 10:32 AM

10. That's beautiful!

And thank you for contributing so much to this place.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hunter (Reply #10)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 11:48 AM

14. Glad You Like It, Sir

I got the bug to do one of these a long time ago; just something about those naked engines....

DU is a nice place to loiter about, and I expect I have by now become part of the local color.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 10:41 AM

11. A fine job, sir!

I really like that forward facing landing skid on the front. Those early aviators were nuts.

And congrats on your post count. You are a valued member of the community.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bluedigger (Reply #11)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 11:49 AM

16. Thank You Very Much, Sir

Those fellows do seem to have had more than a fair share of nerve....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 11:49 AM

15. I was wondering if I'd ever see another model...

excellent work...

Someday you've got to post the whole collection if you haven't already...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Blue_Tires (Reply #15)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 02:15 PM

24. Thank You, Sir --- The Whole Collection Would Be A Bit Much....

But here are a few others ( all in 1/72 scale )....





These are about as modern as I go: the first is an early B-17, stationed at Pearl Harbor in the summer of 1941; the second is a Seversky 'Convoy Fighter', one of twenty sold in 1938 to the Japanese Navy ( with some great scandal when the knowledge became public ), and operated in China during 1939.



This is a Dewoitine 510, a French fighter sold to the Chinese in 1938; the one depicted is the only example of the type to have shot down an enemy aircraft ( which had on board the chief of Japanese navy bombing aviation, as it happened ).





This is the Breguet AG-4 ( only two were ever made ), used in a flight from Paris on September 2, 1914, during which was detected the first signs of the German Gen. von Kluck's turning to pass east of Paris, which led to the Battle of Marne. The model is scratch-built.



This is perhaps the most colorful: a German Albatross DV, of Jasta 4.



This is the Morane-Saulnier Type N militaire, a prototype, flown by Sgt. Gilbert ( a former test pilot for the company ), in May and June of 1915. It is the first scratch-built model I ever made.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Reply #24)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 10:33 PM

37. Scratchbuilt, WHOA ! ! ! I bow down before you.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to FogerRox (Reply #37)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 10:44 PM

41. Driven To It By Esoteric Tastes, My Friend

A lot of the old machines that interest me, no one is ever going to put out a kit of.

I do maintain, though, that scratch-building is more a question of nerve than skill; many more modelers are capable of it than can nerve themselves to try it.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Reply #41)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 10:56 PM

43. True. I have done some small cast metal projects with low temp metal

Some sculpting with 2 part epoxy to modify some 28mm figures. Once you get familiar with the process its fun and easy. One never knows until one tries.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 11:52 AM

17. An examplary job, sir!

Flying this, "back in the day", must have been quite an experience.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Mopar151 (Reply #17)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 02:23 PM

25. Glad You Like It, Sir

According to a brief 'Pilot's Notes' printed at the time as advice for aircrew, this one was fairly sedate, which probably accounts for it's long use as a trainer. It was sort of a flying truck, in essence, made for getting a lot of weight into the air and carrying it a good distance at modest speed.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 01:38 PM

20. Very nice work, sir. nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to awoke_in_2003 (Reply #20)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 05:19 PM

31. Thank You, Sir

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 01:38 PM

21. Excellent job - And congratulations on 80k!

We look forward to another 80K posts from you.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to GoneOffShore (Reply #21)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 05:18 PM

30. Thank You, Sir

Not sure I will ever manage to double it: about half, I should say, piled up in the Moderator forums....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 01:41 PM

22. Congratulations on your 80,000th post. We are

all blessed to have you here.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Raven (Reply #22)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 05:17 PM

29. Thank You Very Much, Ma'am

That means a lot to me.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 02:10 PM

23. Very nicely done!

Hope to see more . . . perhaps a P-38, or a Corsair??

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to CrazyOrangeCat (Reply #23)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 05:16 PM

28. You Sound, Sir, Like One Who Shares The Craft....

Glad you like it.

The items you mention are a bit out of my particular interest, which centers on older machines. I may, though, one day, do an F-82: those were just too weird....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Reply #28)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 10:47 PM

42. To be honest, just kits.

Mostly I just dig planes, trains and automobiles!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 03:22 PM

26. 80,000 posts!

So . . . which one was your favorite?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to tclambert (Reply #26)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 05:05 PM

27. Were I Put to Selecting Just One, Sir, I Expect It Would Be This One...

A Few Thoughts On Socialism, Since The Matter Has Lately Come Up....


In society, no person has the right to injure others for their personal benefit. Everyone recognizes this in the case of a stick-up artist with a pistol in his hand and a snarl of 'Gimmie yer wallet!" on his lips. But a great many things flow from any serious attempt to apply this principle universally. For at the core of our present economic practices is the blunt statement that ownership conveys the right to do injury to others for one's own gain. Indeed, this is even raised to the status of an imperative, presented as something a person does not just have the right to do, but something a person is right to do, and ought to do, whatever the promptings of personal conscience, or protests by those it is done to, might otherwise dictate. An owner who pays cut-throat wages; an owner who lays off workers to increase a profit margin; an owner who looses poisons on the land; an owner who shirks taxation: all these do real injury to fellow citizens, and do it for their own gain. People who do these things constrict the lives of others, disrupt and unsettle the lives of others, inflict illness and its attendant costs on others, force others to open their pockets further to the tax collector, and they do them for no better or different motive than the stick-up artist: they want more money than they have at present, and no scruple whatever in effecting that desire, whatever the harm done to another in its fulfillment.

The chief difference between the case of the stick-up artist and the grasping owner is not the different style of their methods of aggrandizing themselves at the expense of their fellows. The chief difference in their situations is the attitude of the state in which they operate. The state takes an adversarial relation to the stick-up artist: police hunt them, courts jail them. The state does no such thing with the grasping owner: the state is the grasping owner's friend, it is in very fact the pistol in his hand. It is by means of the state that the owner can effect his injuries to others, and the owner depends on the state for his very existence. For the very fact of ownership, the secure possession of a great deal of valuable property in the face of those with less property, or none at all, requires the power of the state, and the exertion of state power on the owner's behalf. Nothing is more puerile and false than the claim of owners that they arise and exist independently of the state, that they owe it nothing, that the state is even their adversary. Without the armed power of the state, the habit of obedience to the state, and the civil order this maintains, it would not be possible for an owner to act in ways that injure many other citizens, indeed, it would be scarcely possible to main concentrations of ownership such that one individual owned a good deal more than others. Equilibrium would be restored, and maintained, by that simplest tool of mass numbers, the mob.

Capital is simply value in excess of immediate consumption, fixed for storage in some durable form for later use, whether that be something so basic as pile of food or so esoteric as a piece of paper people have agreed to regard as more valuable than some other piece of paper. Humankind has been accumulating surplus value ever since the species commenced its existence, and the piles have gotten rather large. They are essential to any complex society. A great deal of what people in society need done, and want done, does not have any immediate pay-off, whatever it may bring in time. While engaged in such doings, people must still eat, be clothed and sheltered, amuse themselves. That is done out of the accumulated surplus, which is replenished by the proceeds of the ventures they are engaged in when these come to fruition, and produce a value greater than what has been consumed in the course of its production. The accumulations of surplus value are the enablers of complex social orders, the engine which moves social activity, and the augmentation of surplus value is the nearest thing to a collective purpose for a complex social order.

That this surplus value should be regarded as a private possession, and the increase of it wrought by the labor of many go into the purses of those who claim it as a private possession, is hardly necessary to its function in society. Tended by stewards rather than held by owners it would perform exactly the same function, and produce exactly the same benefits, for the society around it. It is undoubtedly true that some people would be better at superintending the employment of a society's surplus value than others; there is no field of human endeavor in which differentials in aptitude and skill cannot be discerned. But a system of private ownership of the accumulations of surplus value no more guarantees it will be in hands best suited to manage it than a system of private 'ownership' of the state (in the forms of autocracy or hereditary monarchy) guarantees the state will be well governed. In any society, it swiftly becomes the case that most who enjoy private ownership of large portions of accumulated surplus do so through inheritance, through accident of birth into a privileged class of owners. "No damned nonsense about merit" attends their position as those who possess, direct, and personally profit from, the accumulated surplus that is the heart of the society they exist within, or their position at the apex of it.

A chief method by which the owners of the accumulated surplus value defend their private possession of it is by blurring the concepts of property in capital goods and property in personal effects. They pretend that to deprive them of ownership of banks and factories and fleets of transport and great tracts of land is to deprive people of their personal possessions, and since the same word, 'property', is employed for both things, it is a fairly simple trick to pull off. They have been helped at times by ill-judged social movements who have in fact engaged in the same blurring from the opposite direction, and regarded a carter possessing a truck or a neighborhood baker possessing an oven as objects for expropriation equally with the owners of a fleet of several thousand trucks, or of a dozen factory ovens turning out millions of loaves and cakes each year. But a moment's reflection will disclose that these things are no more identical than a mouse and an elephant, and that the difference is the degree in which they are able by their possessions to impact the lives of others for good or ill. The small proprietor can do little in either direction, and must look the people he or she directly affects in the face: the great owner can do great good or great harm to great numbers, and to people he or she will never see.

It is perverse to the point of absurdity to attempt to seriously maintain decisions concerning how surplus value is to be deployed ought to be made without any concern for the general effects one use or another will have on the society in which it exists, and the people who comprise that society, and insist instead that the sole concern governing how surplus value is deployed ought to be getting more of it into one individual's pockets, whatever any other consequences might be. Actions which have great public effects are properly the concern of the public, and ought to be directed by the public, as the nearest thing possible to a positive assurance they will be made in the public interest. Once this is grasped, it is clear that the private owner of surplus value, and the aggrandizement of the private owner of surplus value, is an irrelevance, where it is not an active agent of harm. A public stewardship would have incentive to increase the accumulated surplus, for doing so is a public good, that enables a society to do more, and is essential to its growing larger and becoming more prosperous. A public stewardship would have no incentive to do this in a way that harmed large portions of the public, and indeed would be actively discouraged by the public from doing any such thing.

( Posted by The Magistrate in General Discussion Thu Oct 23rd 2008, 02:53 PM )

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Reply #27)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 07:01 AM

47. That is a good post.

I originally meant my request as humor, thinking you could never choose a favorite out of 80,000, not without years of research. But that is a good post. I like it that you write in paragraphs, not just sound bites. It demonstrates a depth of thought often lacking in political discussions. Yet there are details in there that really grabbed me.

I only have time to mention one: "the great owner can do great good or great harm to great numbers, and to people he or she will never see." The "never see" part of that got me thinking. Experiments (Stanley Milgram's famous experiments, in particular) show that people find it easier to inflict harm on people at a distance--in another room or behind a barrier of some kind--unseen, remote, more of an abstraction than a real person. Some say it is easier to kill a thousand than to kill just one. If you push a button or issue an order and never personally see the victim, it reduces the feelings of sympathy one would feel if looking the victim in the eye.

And there's my time limit. I have to go make some surplus value for some owner I will never see.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to tclambert (Reply #47)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 10:24 AM

48. Always a Pleasure, Sir, When Someone Takes An Essential Point

I have squirreled some of my comments here away over the years in the journal function.

When I was a moderator, it was fun to occasionally look up my own file, which contained in the record of deleted posts several masterpieces of invective....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 07:21 PM

32. Very nice, SWEET DUDE, er ah Sir....

I do a wee bit of the modeling myself. N Scale Narrow Gauge Steam Trains. Wargaming Miniatures, tanks, planes.

This was a Star Wars Stap and Droid kit, some putty and sanding and I turned into a Pharon Battle Tank for a wargame, Vor.






A Trencher Unit for a wargame, Warzone.



A Hydra from the wargame Void.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to FogerRox (Reply #32)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 07:51 PM

33. That Is Some Very Nice Painting, Sir

The figures are 20mm size?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Reply #33)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 10:15 PM

36. Thank you sir, The Trencher unit is 28mm.

I saw your other pix, very nice work Sir. I stood on the wing of a PT-22 back about 13 years ago, sweet plane. I see you use ground foam on your bases. I've used matte medium to afix sifted sand and dirt and maybe a rock or 2 or even a tree stump, then apply the ground foam. A newer product is static grass, it is superb used with ground foam.

The amount of resin, photo etched etc. up grades for plastic models is stupendous.

I used to work a hobby shop, we did a lot of wargaming. Napoleonic, Am Rev, Am Civil, WW2, sci fi and fantasy wargames. I once made a 22 ft x 4 ft Normandy beach head from pink building insulation foam for a WW2 28mm event. Also Leningrad & Stalingrad.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to FogerRox (Reply #36)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 10:36 PM

38. That Is An Unfamiliar Scale To Me, Sir

I do not know much about table-top gaming. I have seen some excellent modeling associated with it, though. With aircraft, I expect there are types you could make completely from after-market parts, without a 'kit' at all. There is even some stuff for the kind of 'classic years' subjects and old kits I favor, nowadays.

The bases are actually plastic sheet, which is given a coating of epoxy to give it some depth. I then cover it with colored grout, sprinkled over dilute white glue. My local hobby shop is pretty general purpose, and has a large doll-house section, in which I found small packets of this stuff in various colors, including many greys and browns quite suitable for earth colors. The powder is very fine, practically aerosol in quality, so it gives a good texture for the small scale. No more than a about teaspoonful is required. I use Woodland Scenics static grass in various mixed tones over this. Sometimes I will toss in a bit of sand or earth or a few pebbles. For snow I use baking soda ( not powder ):



( a Polikarpov I-15bis on the Leningrad front, early in 1942 )

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Reply #38)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 11:03 PM

44. Matte Medium is like white glue, less brittle.

28mm is close to I/72nd. I made a shot up crash landed Stukka, based on plexi glass, with all those materials. For a Wargame scenario called "Saving Pilot Brian".

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 08:40 PM

34. Dear Magistrate, You truly are a Renaissance Man. Congrats on your 80,000..

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to monmouth3 (Reply #34)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 10:37 PM

39. Thank You, Ma'am

Wife still regards me as a refugee from the Bronze Age....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Reply #39)

Sun Mar 3, 2013, 01:41 PM

70. A refugee from the Bronze Age of the Middle Kingdom.

Fixed it for you.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 08:58 PM

35. OK, call me impressed.

That is museum/gallery-quality work. I only can wish that I could see it in person, close-up.

If I may ask, how many hours do you think went into this masterpiece?

Sometimes, Sir, a mere "WOW!" can suffice.
DBH

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DollarBillHines (Reply #35)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 10:41 PM

40. Thank You, Sir

The camera is kind, I find. I assure you I can find all sorts of flaws in these, and am firmly of the 'my best is my next' school.

I do not keep time sheets, of course, but I would guess there are about a hundred hours, over about three months, put into the Vimy. Twenty to twenty-five would be, I suspect, about normal for a single-engined machine

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 11:23 PM

45. Glad to see you're still here

 

.
.
.

Due to financial issues, I haven't been around much

That changed for the better a week ago

I'll be around more often now

heck - I checked my own profile

I've been with DU for ten years

still like y'all

nice plane - I used to do model cars in my youth

- when I get settled, I might rekindle that hobby

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ConcernedCanuk (Reply #45)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 12:42 AM

46. Thank You, Sir

Good to see you back.

I did this as a kid myself, and took it up again after getting some adverse health news. I find it relaxing, at least usually....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 12:41 PM

49. You, Sir, Are A Cad And A Fraud!

I do not believe for one moment that you have assembled this 'scale model' with such fanatical attention paid to both historical accuracy and detail!





I do believe, however, that you have either designed and built or acquired through nefarious means both a time-travel device and miniaturization ray, and have produced as your own work an actual aeroplane stolen from the RAF.














I half expect that you have in your posession both a miniature flight and ground crew, cruelly imprisoned.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Ikonoklast (Reply #49)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 01:25 PM

50. You Can Hardly Expect Me To Acknowledge That As True, Sir, Not Out in The Clear Like This

Think of the effects on the stock markets....

But it is common knowledge on the better modeling forums that people construct pencils the size of telephone poles, dimes the size of coffee tables, and similar contrivances, to conceal the true nature of the things they photograph and post up for perusal.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 01:28 PM

51. Congrats on 80,000 posts!

Great looking plane!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hrmjustin (Reply #51)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 01:46 PM

54. Thank You, Sir, On Both Counts

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 01:36 PM

52. I see someone is into dope....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #52)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 01:50 PM

55. While I Do Love The Scent of Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Sir

This gives me scant opportunity to indulge. These are static display models. Those who do flying models seldom talk about the joys of surface preparation, though we all know what they are. I have often wondered if the stuff got its name from the effect of the fumes on people who had been brushing it on a couple dozen square yards of linen in a shed for several hours....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Reply #55)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 02:00 PM

57. Hell, some of that stuff is like amyl nitrate.

Just don't use it near a pilot light...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #57)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 02:07 PM

58. Beyond The Volatillity Of The Shrinking Mediums, Sir

The English routine for the 'silver wings' finish was several coats of a dope pigmented mostly with iron oxide powder, followed by several coats of a dope pigmented with aluminum powder, so the machines were essentially coated with thermite....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Reply #58)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 02:13 PM

59. Appropriate for a bomber.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #59)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 02:17 PM

60. It Blocked Sunlight From the Fabric, Sir, And Reflected Heat Better Than Any Other Finish Tried

Sunlight rots fabric, and heat ages and warps wooden structures. Fire in any degree meant a write-off, so if it went up like firework when it did go, it made little difference.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Reply #60)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 02:20 PM

61. Except to the pilot.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #61)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 02:26 PM

62. They Had Parachutes By Then, Sir

Fires were mostly tripped off in flight by the gasoline supply, and in most designs still, the pilot sat on, or leaned against, or stared straight ahead at, a fuel tank. In the Vimy, he leaned back against a very large container of gasoline.

Safety concerns, at least as they are understood nowadays, hardly existed back then as factors in design. It was expected to be a damned dangerous thing to do.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Reply #62)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 02:35 PM

63. It was all new then...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 01:42 PM

53. Dear Sir

Your posts always are interesting, entertaining, challenging and often charming.

DU is richer for your presence and your comments.

Thank you for being there.

Oh, and the model is fascinating. Any chances it can traverse some feet in an open space?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to question everything (Reply #53)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 01:56 PM

56. Thank You Very Much, Sir

I expect it could, but not laterally, shall we say. These are static pieces; they can be dropped ( and one or two have been ), but not flown. The worst 'wrecks' I have had were things placed or dropped on top of models: in one instance, a bag of lollipops placed atop one by a child who shall remain nameless, in another, I tipped a large bottle of school glue over onto a scratch-built model when it was literally a few moments from completion ( I still look wistfully at the pieces of that one on occasion, and think of putting it back together again... ).

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Sat Mar 2, 2013, 07:15 PM

64. A beautiful model, and thank you, Majistrate, for your presence here at DU

I've always been fascinated by those old biplane bombers (and early airliners)! There's a sort of Jules Verne ambience to them.

I do want to express my appreciation for all of your posts that I've read. You've always been a voice of reason and civility. That's especially appreciated in these recent years when Democratic Underground threads seem more like a barroom brawl than a civilized discussion.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to LongTomH (Reply #64)

Sat Mar 2, 2013, 09:29 PM

66. Thank You, Sir, For The Kind Words

There is something about those types in that period, I agree.

The Vimy was the basis for one of the early airlines, known as the Vimy Commercial. The largest contract was from the Republic of China, for some four dozen. Here are a couple of photographs of the Chinese lot:







Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Sat Mar 2, 2013, 09:20 PM

65. Happy 80,000th

I saw your planes and it made me think of this

I came accross this in the St Paul paper this week. I hope you enjoy this as much as I did

The flight of Old 666
http://voxvocispublicus.homestead.com/morrow.html

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Frosty1 (Reply #65)

Sun Mar 3, 2013, 01:21 PM

68. Thank You, Sir

I will look at that when I get the opportunity; at present I am on an old machine and the browser cannot handle that.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Sun Mar 3, 2013, 05:47 AM

67. Beautiful model!

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Demo_Chris (Reply #67)

Sun Mar 3, 2013, 01:22 PM

69. Glad You Like It, Sir

Thank you.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Mon Mar 4, 2013, 09:43 AM

71. Well done Sir, well done.

I don't think I shall ever be able to celebrate my 80,000th post, as my comments are fairly few and far between. I do, however, enjoy listening and learning from the many people I have had the honor of knowing here on Democratic Underground. I do esteem you Sir, and thank you for sharing your love of model making and history with us.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Loki (Reply #71)

Mon Mar 4, 2013, 05:06 PM

72. Thank You Very Much, Sir

I appreciate your kind words.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Magistrate (Original post)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 02:13 AM

73. Beautiful aircraft and LOVE your posts!

Common sense is in such short supply.

Carry on, Sir, to your 100,000th post!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to colorado_ufo (Reply #73)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 05:04 PM

74. Thank You, Sir

One hundred thousand is a nice round number....

Here is the first one I completed this year:





A Curtiss F11-2 of VF-1B, assigned to the U.S.S. Saratoga in July, 1933.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread