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Sat Jan 26, 2013, 07:13 PM

Heros, Subs, Hoagies, Grinders, Po Boys

Explain their differences and similarities. Show your work.

34 replies, 2204 views

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Arrow 34 replies Author Time Post
Reply Heros, Subs, Hoagies, Grinders, Po Boys (Original post)
Yavin4 Jan 2013 OP
warrior1 Jan 2013 #1
hollysmom Jan 2013 #2
kudzu22 Jan 2013 #6
TheMightyFavog Jan 2013 #3
LiberalEsto Jan 2013 #13
NutmegYankee Jan 2013 #17
KamaAina Jan 2013 #24
femmocrat Jan 2013 #4
A Little Weird Jan 2013 #5
union_maid Jan 2013 #8
LiberalEsto Jan 2013 #14
union_maid Jan 2013 #15
SteveG Jan 2013 #34
Demoiselle Jan 2013 #7
randr Jan 2013 #28
harmonicon Jan 2013 #9
tavernier Jan 2013 #10
union_maid Jan 2013 #11
Graybeard Jan 2013 #20
union_maid Jan 2013 #12
trof Jan 2013 #16
KamaAina Jan 2013 #25
trof Jan 2013 #31
jmowreader Jan 2013 #18
Populist_Prole Jan 2013 #19
MiddleFingerMom Jan 2013 #21
KamaAina Jan 2013 #27
Populist_Prole Jan 2013 #29
LeftinOH Jan 2013 #22
raptor_rider Jan 2013 #23
KamaAina Jan 2013 #26
Taverner Jan 2013 #30
sakabatou Jan 2013 #32
XRubicon Jan 2013 #33

Response to Yavin4 (Original post)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 07:16 PM

1. My dog ate my paper

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Response to warrior1 (Reply #1)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 07:21 PM

2. +1

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Response to warrior1 (Reply #1)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 04:14 PM

6. No that was me :)

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Response to Yavin4 (Original post)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 07:24 PM

3. Grinders, I think are baked to get the cheese nice and gooey.

And Po'Boys are native to Louisiana, and unlike most subs have seafood, fried shrimp in particular.

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Response to TheMightyFavog (Reply #3)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 07:26 PM

13. Grinders are from Massachusetts as far as I know

Subs are NYC
Hoagies - I've heard the term in NJ but it's usually subs there.

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Response to LiberalEsto (Reply #13)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 07:52 PM

17. Hoagies are around Philadelphia

The normal Italian uses unique hard roll, oil and vinegar, and has oregano added with the meats, provolone, and lettuce & tomato & onions.

Combo/Italian Grinders, like here in SE Conn, are similar but on a softer roll and no oregano or onions.

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Response to LiberalEsto (Reply #13)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 05:29 PM

24. Grinders can be found as far south as southern CT

In NJ, there's a sub/hoagie dividing line through the middle of the state, which also separates Yankees/Mets from Phillies fans.

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Response to Yavin4 (Original post)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 08:38 PM

4. Subs used to be long and hoagies were short.

I don't know what the difference is now. Nor do I know what a grinder or a po boy is!

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Response to Yavin4 (Original post)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 10:48 PM

5. Location

My 2 cents:

Po' boys are a New Orleans institution - usually involves seafood but can also be other meats.

Subs, hoagies, heros, and grinders are basically the same thing but with different regional names. Although I've always heard the real long sandwiches called subs. The hoagies are from Philadelphia, subs from New York, and the grinders from (I think) Massachusetts. I don't know about the heros.

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Response to A Little Weird (Reply #5)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 05:43 PM

8. Subs might be from upstate, NY

Down in in NYC and on Long Island (all I can actually speak to) they were heroes until Subway and other chains came along and homogenized the language. When I was a kid I NEVER heard them called anything but heroes.

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Response to union_maid (Reply #8)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 07:27 PM

14. I wonder if hero came from the Greek gyro? nt

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Response to LiberalEsto (Reply #14)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 07:34 PM

15. I guess that's possible

Although the explanation at this link is more or less what I've always heard:

http://ephemeralnewyork.wordpress.com/2009/03/21/how-the-hero-sandwich-got-its-name/

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Response to union_maid (Reply #8)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 07:40 PM

34. In northern DE they've always been called subs.

Sliced 10 inch or longer Italian roll, Olive oil on roll, layer hard salami down both sides of the roll partly hanging over each side, provolone cheese, tomato, lettuce, onion, sweet or hot peppers, salt pepper oregano, layer ham thinly sliced, fold salami over edges of ham, close the roll, slice in half. That's how we make an Italian.

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Response to Yavin4 (Original post)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 05:42 PM

7. Hoagie is the accepted Philadelphia term.

My favorite hoagie is made of
ham, salami, cheese, tomato, lettuce, onion, generous portions of olive oil and oregano, all folded into a lovely 10-inch long Italian roll.
At least I think that's what's in it. I prefer it without really hot salami.
I'm pleased to report that a hoagie shop has just opened within a hundred yards of my house. I am very happy.

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Response to Demoiselle (Reply #7)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 06:14 PM

28. Right on

Hoagies were found in Philadelphia and surrounding Pa areas, subs, also known as submarine sandwiches, were found in Delaware. Grinders are from further north and you could have found all three in Jersey.

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Response to Yavin4 (Original post)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 05:56 PM

9. The first four are the same thing.

Po Boys are something different.

Money, please?

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Response to Yavin4 (Original post)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 06:24 PM

10. So glad you asked!

Many years ago there was a pizza place in Kalamazoo called the Pizza Yen. They made a sub to. die. for.

This is it:

Crispy on the outside, soft of the inside sub bun
ham (not boiled... the good stuff)
onion slices (yellow, not sweet)
hot pizza sauce (a lot) (not spicy, hot as in temperature)
mozzarella cheese (a lot)


By the time they delivered it to your house in the paper sleeve, the copious amounts of cheese had melted from the hot sauce, all gooey and yummy and needing ten paper napkins.

Orgasmic.


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Response to Yavin4 (Original post)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 06:52 PM

11. In lower NY heroes can be hot or cold

Cold ones can have anything you might normally put in a sandwich in them. My favorite is the Italian Hero, which generally has salami, pepperoni, prociutto, maybe some provolone, lettuce, tomatos and with any luck some roasted peppers topped off with Italian dressing. Just thinking about that is making me hungry and I just had dinner. Hot ones usually used to contain some sort of Italian food - meatballs, sausage and peppers, chicken, veal or eggplant parmigiana being among the most popular. Now, there are a lot more varieties offered, usually involving boneless chicken breast and some combination of cheese and other things.

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Response to union_maid (Reply #11)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 06:27 AM

20. Peppers and eggs hero.

One of my favorites is a scooped-out, crusty Italian bread filled with scrambled eggs and green peppers & onions (with plenty of butter on the bread).

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Response to Yavin4 (Original post)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 06:53 PM

12. Question

While we're on the subject of the sandwich which I still think of as a hero, are six foot long ones popular party food everywhere, or is that a regional thing? I don't think you could have a superbowl party without a six foot long hero here. There might be statutes about it.

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Response to Yavin4 (Original post)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 07:35 PM

16. Hey! What about Muffulettas?

A traditional style muffuletta sandwich consists of a muffuletta loaf split horizontally and covered with layers of marinated olive salad, capicola, mortadella, salami, pepperoni, ham, Swiss cheese and provolone. The sandwich is sometimes heated to soften the provolone. Quarter, half, and full-sized muffulettas are sold.

The signature olive salad consists of olives diced with the celery, cauliflower and carrot found in a jar of giardiniera, seasoned with oregano and garlic, covered in olive oil, and allowed to combine for at least 24 hours.

Today, olive salad is commercially produced for restaurants and retail sale by such vendors as the Boscoli Family, Rouses, Dorignacs, Franks, Roland Imported Foods, and Aunt Sally's.

The traditional way to serve the sandwich at Central Grocery is cold, but many vendors will toast. This was mentioned in the PBS special Sandwiches That You Will Like.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muffuletta

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Response to trof (Reply #16)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 05:31 PM

25. The muffuletta roll is round rather than torpedo-shaped

hence, NOLA's other sandwich is outside the scope of this discussion.

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Response to KamaAina (Reply #25)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 06:54 PM

31. picky

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Response to Yavin4 (Original post)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 10:28 PM

18. Grinders are from anywhere in New England

If you go to the Italian section of Boston, you can't get a grinder. There you can get a Spuckie. Same sandwich, just a different name.

Grinders (which of course are pronounced "grindahs" because it IS New England) can be had cold but you have to specify that.

And for the record, the best grinder shop in New England is Parthenon Pizza in Ayer, MA.

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Response to Yavin4 (Original post)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 01:36 AM

19. Around where I grew up it was called a "Wedge"

I have no idea why, and I only heard the term in the immediate geographical area, but it was a populated one.

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Response to Populist_Prole (Reply #19)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 06:55 AM

21. ???

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(edit to add) And I just saw Guy Fieri(?) cut a very tasty-looking baguette Cuban sandwich
into triangles (wedges).
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Response to Populist_Prole (Reply #19)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 05:37 PM

27. Was it upstate New York?

I once saw a map of these terms, and it had "wedge" over upstate NY.

Also, Binghamton (!) has its very own sandwich, called a "spiedie". It is basically a kebab on a roll (minus the skewer, of course ).

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Response to KamaAina (Reply #27)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 06:15 PM

29. Well kinda'

To many in NYC, anything north of city limits is "upstate", but the term "wedge" is in widespread use in Westchester, Putnam and Dutchess counties, possibly Rockland county as well. Your talking a total of 1 million+ people in that area.

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Response to Yavin4 (Original post)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 10:00 AM

22. Differences: They are called different things in different parts of

the country but they are essentially the same thing. Similarities: They are always tightly wrapped in plastic film; once unwrapped, the bun is found to be so soggy from pickle juice that the whole thing has to be thrown away.

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Response to Yavin4 (Original post)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 11:21 AM

23. Just give me

Pastrami on rye, with Swiss, mayo and 'kraut, of course!!!

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Response to Yavin4 (Original post)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 05:33 PM

26. Po'boys should be made with Leidenheimer bread

similarly, Philly cheesesteaks should be served on Amoroso rolls. There is a fad out here in the Bay Area for Philly-style cheesesteak joints, some of which fly in Amoroso rolls. Srsly.

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Response to KamaAina (Reply #26)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 06:20 PM

30. Adomsons. Adomsons is French Dip Heaven

 

Prime Rib...Sirloin...mmmmmmmm

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Response to Yavin4 (Original post)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 07:03 PM

32. I want a damn sandwhich, I don't care what they're called.

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Response to Yavin4 (Original post)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 07:19 PM

33. Sub and a tonic

North of Boston...

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