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Sun Dec 23, 2012, 11:47 AM

math? Construction crew, apply here. Concrete debris loads. TYPO CORRECTED

Last edited Mon Dec 24, 2012, 10:50 AM - Edit history (1)

ON EDIT: Thanks to jmowreader for catching the TYPO of the dimensions of the container, EIGHT feet wide, NOT EIGHTEEN.
**************************


A container for disposing of construction debris/concrete is 18' x 22' x 3' = 1,188 (of what? volume? not weight)

A concrete slab to be demolished/removed is 700 sq. ft, is about 4" height, so is this:

700 x .34' = 238 (of cubic/volume?)


So how many loads of the container will it take to dispose of the rubble, would it be 1188 divided by 238? One load?



************** REFIGURED WITH CORRECTED DIMENSIONS: *********


8' x 22' x 3' = 528 cubic feet. 700 sq.ft x .34ft = 238 cubic feet. So this is about half of the container? One load?

23 replies, 1696 views

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Arrow 23 replies Author Time Post
Reply math? Construction crew, apply here. Concrete debris loads. TYPO CORRECTED (Original post)
UTUSN Dec 2012 OP
Ptah Dec 2012 #1
UTUSN Dec 2012 #5
Turbineguy Dec 2012 #2
UTUSN Dec 2012 #3
Gidney N Cloyd Dec 2012 #11
UTUSN Dec 2012 #12
Hassin Bin Sober Dec 2012 #4
A Simple Game Dec 2012 #9
Hassin Bin Sober Dec 2012 #10
UTUSN Dec 2012 #15
Viva_La_Revolution Dec 2012 #6
Scuba Dec 2012 #7
UTUSN Dec 2012 #8
hopemountain Dec 2012 #13
UTUSN Dec 2012 #14
Kali Dec 2012 #20
hunter Dec 2012 #16
jmowreader Dec 2012 #17
UTUSN Dec 2012 #18
Kali Dec 2012 #19
UTUSN Dec 2012 #21
Kali Dec 2012 #22
jmowreader Dec 2012 #23

Response to UTUSN (Original post)

Sun Dec 23, 2012, 11:49 AM

1. 18' x 22' x 3' = 1,188 cubic feet

700 sq.ft. x .34' = 238 cubic feet.

1188/ 238 = 5 loads.

Oops!
238/1188 = less than one.

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Response to Ptah (Reply #1)

Sun Dec 23, 2012, 12:17 PM

5. So it's about 1/4 of one container/load/trip. Any idea what concrete weighs? The price

is $36.40/wk for the container, $144.38/load/trip, + $17.64/ weight(? of cubic ft? or what?).

Will need to call them to find out what the weight factor is. Thanks.

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Response to UTUSN (Original post)

Sun Dec 23, 2012, 11:50 AM

2. When we went through that

they told us to not exceed 1/3 the height of the container with concrete pieces.

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Response to Turbineguy (Reply #2)

Sun Dec 23, 2012, 11:58 AM

3. Yeah, this container is the smallest one

The city said exactly what you said, but for the two larger sizes of containers. They said the towing vehicles couldn't pick up the weight of more than that, but that this smallest size (equaling the 1/3 filling of the other two) can be filled to the top.

But if Ptah/poster #1 and I are correct, even this small container will be under the limit (I hope).

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Response to UTUSN (Reply #3)

Sun Dec 23, 2012, 03:50 PM

11. That slab of concrete probably isn't going to be broken up into small enough pieces to...

...settle neatly into the bottom 1/3 of the bin.

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Response to Gidney N Cloyd (Reply #11)

Sun Dec 23, 2012, 04:02 PM

12. The 1/3 regards the larger bins. This smallest one can be filled to the top and this amount

of concrete, according to our mathing-around here, is less than 1/4 of the bin, so the bigger chunks should?/might have room to pile up?

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Response to UTUSN (Original post)

Sun Dec 23, 2012, 12:12 PM

4. That seems like an odd shaped container.

I assume it's a roll-off container.

I don't recall ever seeing one 18x22.

Usually they are about 8ish feet wide (the width of my parking space).

This is one of the larger dumpsters.

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Response to Hassin Bin Sober (Reply #4)

Sun Dec 23, 2012, 02:20 PM

9. I was going to tell UTUSN to recheck the size.

You would need a special permit to haul anything that size. It's either too high or too wide.

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Response to A Simple Game (Reply #9)

Sun Dec 23, 2012, 02:27 PM

10. Yep. That one shown is about as big as they come.

There are higher containers that go over my head - probably about six feet - but you can't fill those to the top with concrete.

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Response to A Simple Game (Reply #9)

Sun Dec 23, 2012, 04:26 PM

15. The dimensions are what the City provided. n/t

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Response to UTUSN (Original post)

Sun Dec 23, 2012, 12:34 PM

6. They charge by weight

and the trucks can't pick it up if it's too heavy. make sure you check their limits.

edit: oh! and check into recycling. If you happen to have a center near, you may be able to wrangle a better deal.
http://www.cdrecycling.org/ <-- contact to find one

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Response to UTUSN (Original post)

Sun Dec 23, 2012, 12:41 PM

7. This is my favorite thread so far today. What's wrong with me?

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Response to Scuba (Reply #7)

Sun Dec 23, 2012, 12:58 PM

8. Hey!1 It wasn't brains that got me to Vietnam!1

"19 Most Mystifying Cher Tweets" makes me feel *much* better about my erratic posts

*************QUOTE*************

http://gawker.com/5970229/can-anyone-c-me-the-19-most-mystifying-cher-tweets-of-2012

‘Can anyone c me’: The 19 Most Mystifying Cher Tweets of 2012

Caity Weaver


At the intersection of celebrity and "weird twitter," there is the personal twitter account of singer Cher.

Her tweets read alternately, like horse_ebooks source material, /aLL CAPS EMAIL FORWARDS FROMM.YOUR AUNT, and the sly jokes of a professional adult woman who is capable of functioning in the real world. Her misspellings she attributes to either passion or dyslexia. Her feed boasts an average of 1000 tweets per day.

Here are 19 of Cher's 20 Best Tweets of 2012. (In order to see #20 which, surely, is still to come, follow @Cher sometime between now and New Years.) ....



(the Cher tweets at link)

*************UNQUOTE*************

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Response to UTUSN (Reply #8)

Sun Dec 23, 2012, 04:18 PM

13. i understood every one of her tweets.

nothing wrong with cher. she is nORmal.

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Response to hopemountain (Reply #13)

Sun Dec 23, 2012, 04:22 PM

14. Mine, too?!1 I posted about hers because mine are occasionally - O.K., OFTEN!1 - erratic!1 n/t

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Response to UTUSN (Reply #8)

Mon Dec 24, 2012, 11:34 AM

20. you crack me up UTUSN

cher tweets

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Response to UTUSN (Original post)

Sun Dec 23, 2012, 05:54 PM

16. Our community has an aggressive concrete recycling program.

They won't take it as ordinary landfill but they will do all the math. A contractor only has to sign the check. Mostly they grind it up and use it as road fill.

Thus far I've always been able to build new stuff with my own concrete waste. I use the broken pieces like any other kind of rock.


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Response to UTUSN (Original post)

Mon Dec 24, 2012, 03:45 AM

17. Four loads. Minimum.

IWe first know the container is not 18 feet wide.

Now let's play. If the place your slab is in is dead level, there are 26 yards of concrete in the slab. Because we know it's not, kick that up to 29 yards. At 4000 pounds per yard of cured concrete, you have 58 tons of concrete to get rid of. You rented a Bobcat, correct?

If the container and its dolly weigh five tons and the tractor and trailer both have tandem axles, a quarter of your slab will get you real close to the federal weight limits for five-axle trucks.

So...no less than four loads and five will be safer.

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Response to jmowreader (Reply #17)

Mon Dec 24, 2012, 10:32 AM

18. Whoa!1 You are correct, it's EIGHT (8), *not* EIGHTEEN(18) - a typo. Will correct it. Thanks!

Your info about the weight is just what I need.



ON EDIT: I'm not getting the four/five loads. My corrected numbers (in the Edited O.P.) are: 8' x 22' 3' = 528 cu.ft of the container and the 700 sq.ft x .34ft = 238 cu.ft, so wouldn't this be about half the container/one load? Or given the bulk of the chunks, two loads?

The container comes from the City, so their transporting is within whatever the regs are. I don't do the bobcat. I'm trying to choose among three crews and their proposals, trying to keep my being scammed to a minimum.

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Response to UTUSN (Reply #18)

Mon Dec 24, 2012, 11:23 AM

19. wish we were closer

husb and sons would be perfect for your job. why are you getting rid of the slab? want a stone patio instead?

I know just the person for that job and may have housing in your city if I recall correctly.


oh he says 4 or 5 loads too, depends on what vehicle can haul

2nd edit, he says if they said you can fill that container all the way then you can probably do it in one or two trips

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Response to Kali (Reply #19)

Mon Dec 24, 2012, 12:01 PM

21. Two reasons: Have rid the neighborhood of a slum lord & am turning it into green space

When I first moved into this street 20 yrs ago it was all single family owners, peaceful. Then about ten years ago, FLIPPERS moved in for their kill, taking over about three houses, lucky me right next to me. After a couple or three years of their mayhem, they finally found their permanent buyers, two different slum lords who proceeded to scalp tenants, with the tenants themselves rotating every year or two, each set with their own set of special circumstances: Loud parties, or attempting to operate businesses in this Residential Zone, parking in front of everybody's spaces, car alarms going off 24 hrs/da, CB radio blaring into my bedroom window, and on and on.

So when the tenants next door moved this year, I pounced, then relocated the house to a nice young couple, and joined the lot to mine/homestead, and will fence it in and plant things. There's only one slum lord left in the neighborhood FOR NOW. One of the flippers still has a house on the other side of me and wants to sell it, no telling who to.

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Response to UTUSN (Reply #21)

Mon Dec 24, 2012, 12:08 PM

22. ah! I approve of exchanging concrete for plants!

sounded like it might have been a patio replacement and know they can be covered instead of removed

of course I see concrete as permanent, husband has no problem seeing it as removable

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Response to UTUSN (Reply #18)

Mon Dec 24, 2012, 04:02 PM

23. Don't look at volume here. Look at weight.

I must have fed in a wrong number somewhere--benefits of doing calculations after midnight...

I redid it, and got 38,024 lbs for your slab. 34,000 is as much as you can legally haul...so you're really looking at two loads.

About the volume: 238 cubic feet (actually more than that because the bottom of the slab isn't flat) is what the slab is intact. When you break it up, it's going to grow because the pieces won't fit together exactly. There's also steel in it, or should be, and that's going to stick out.

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