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Tue Jan 3, 2012, 01:00 PM

What is your favorite American English dialect?

I don't have a single favorite, but I like the R-dropping coastal Southern dialects (think Jimmy Carter), and the dialects of New England (pahk da cah in hahvahd yahd!)

And, of course, I like my own accent, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Central_American_English , which is also developing elements of the Northern Cities Vowel Shit (so when I say "cat" it sounds something like "ket", but with the vowel held longer).

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Arrow 49 replies Author Time Post
Reply What is your favorite American English dialect? (Original post)
Odin2005 Jan 2012 OP
FSogol Jan 2012 #1
Bunny Jan 2012 #2
femmocrat Jan 2012 #21
Richardo Jan 2012 #36
Bunny Jan 2012 #42
distantearlywarning Jan 2012 #22
Richardo Jan 2012 #35
Still Blue in PDX Jan 2012 #44
Still Blue in PDX Jan 2012 #45
rrneck Jan 2012 #3
KamaAina Jan 2012 #4
Odin2005 Jan 2012 #12
KamaAina Jan 2012 #26
RebelOne Jan 2012 #5
pokerfan Jan 2012 #6
Ikonoklast Jan 2012 #17
PassingFair Jan 2012 #7
Odin2005 Jan 2012 #11
Ikonoklast Jan 2012 #19
Odin2005 Jan 2012 #20
dimbear Jan 2012 #8
Odin2005 Jan 2012 #9
RainDog Jan 2012 #10
applegrove Jan 2012 #13
pitohui Jan 2012 #14
nirvana555 Jan 2012 #16
AmandaRuth Jan 2012 #31
independentLiberal Jan 2012 #15
kwassa Jan 2012 #18
Doc Holliday Jan 2012 #38
OriginalGeek Jan 2012 #23
Burma Jones Jan 2012 #24
nolabear Jan 2012 #27
MrCoffee Jan 2012 #29
tabbycat31 Jan 2012 #25
Iggo Jan 2012 #28
geardaddy Jan 2012 #30
tjwmason Jan 2012 #32
Sanity Claws Jan 2012 #33
geardaddy Jan 2012 #34
Doc Holliday Jan 2012 #39
blueamy66 Jan 2012 #37
Honeycombe8 Jan 2012 #40
trof Jan 2012 #41
Odin2005 Jan 2012 #43
Honeycombe8 Jan 2012 #46
Odin2005 Jan 2012 #47
Honeycombe8 Jan 2012 #48
aikoaiko Jan 2012 #49

Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 01:02 PM

1. Pittsburgh! Yinz (You ones)

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Response to FSogol (Reply #1)


Response to Bunny (Reply #2)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 10:30 PM

21. Me three!

Sownz like home t'me! n@

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Response to Bunny (Reply #2)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 04:09 PM

36. Jagoff!

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Response to Richardo (Reply #36)


Response to FSogol (Reply #1)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 10:32 PM

22. Yes, Pittsburghese!

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Response to FSogol (Reply #1)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 04:09 PM

35. I'll meet ya dahn Pianelli station.

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Response to FSogol (Reply #1)


Response to FSogol (Reply #1)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 08:24 PM

45. When we lived in Pittsburgh my SIL told me I have a California accent.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 01:11 PM

3. As a son of the south

with the accent to go with it (think red state update) I have a lot of fun with it.

But any region that seems to have built an accent around "fuck you you fuckin' fuck" and fuggataboutit" gets my vote.

Fuckin' New York baby.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 01:31 PM

4. Hawai'i Creole English (Pidgin)

Wot, you nevah like?

Pidgin even has a robust literature of its own, with award-winning writers like Lois-Ann Yamanaka (disclaimer: "Tita" is a personal and FB friend) and Nora Okja Keller, and a Pidgin-friendly publishing house, Bamboo Ridge Press.

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Response to KamaAina (Reply #4)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 08:08 PM

12. Well, technically creoles are seperate languages.

I find Haitian Creole to be cool.

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Response to Odin2005 (Reply #12)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 12:11 PM

26. Pidgin doesn't quite cut it as a separate language

although a speaker of standard English would be just as much at sea among Pidgin speakers as, say, those of Yorkshire dialect.

Oh, and Haiti's native tongue is spelled "Kreyol".

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 01:38 PM

5. The one I still have.

I was born in Philadelphia but grew up in Miami, FL, and now live in North Georgia, but I never lost my Philadelphia accent.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 02:29 PM

6. wiki has a big list of English dialects

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_dialects_of_the_English_language#North_America

Since Mexico is part of the Americas then I would have to say that I find English spoken with a Spanish accent to be especially devastating when I hear it from the opposite sex.

But if it's just the fifty states, then I would have to go with Western American: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_American_English

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Response to pokerfan (Reply #6)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 09:22 PM

17. Gee, I can commiserate.

It's bad enought when told to "Get lost!" in unaccented English.









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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 03:25 PM

7. We HAVE no accent...aside from a tendency to sound "nasal".

Greetings from Michigan, mid-west bland.....

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Response to PassingFair (Reply #7)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 08:06 PM

11. False, Michigan is the center of the Northern Cities Vowel Shift.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inland_Northern_American_English

The Inland North dialect of American English is spoken in a region that includes most of the cities along the Erie Canal and on the U.S. side of Great Lakes region, reaching approximately from Herkimer, New York to Green Bay, Wisconsin, as well as a corridor extending down across central Illinois from Chicago to St. Louis.

This dialect used to be the Standard Midwestern speech that is traditionally regarded as the basis for General American in the mid-20th century, though it has been since modified by an innovative vowel shift known as the Northern Cities Shift, which has altered its character.

Notable speakers of the Inland North Dialect include US President Ronald Reagan, former Governor of Massachusetts Mitt Romney, actors, Dennis Farina, Dennis Franz, Gene Wilder, as well as the late John Belushi and Chris Farley; US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton; actresses Bonnie Hunt and Jami Gertz; filmmaker Michael Moore; financial adviser Suze Orman; talk show host Steve Wilkos; and musicians Iggy Pop and Bob Seger.

The dialect was used for comedic affect in the Saturday Night Live skit Bill Swerski's Superfans, and in the film The Blues Brothers.

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Response to Odin2005 (Reply #11)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 09:40 PM

19. Across a thin strip of Northern Ohio there still can be found a strong influence of the speech

patterns of Connecticut settlers when this part of the country was the Western Reserve of that state, and the settlers who were given The Firelands as compensation for their property losses during the Revolutionary War.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connecticut_Western_Reserve

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firelands



I have been asked what part of New England I come from, especially when down South, or out West.

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Response to Ikonoklast (Reply #19)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 10:20 PM

20. Yup, That part of Ohio votes like New England, too.

If you look at a country-by-country political map of the Lower Midwest along with a dialect map, a culture map, and a settlement pattern map; ALL of them align, it's amazing.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 07:55 PM

8. Standard American, the goal toward which all educated speakers strive, but a tip of the hat to

gullah.

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Response to dimbear (Reply #8)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 08:04 PM

9. "the goal toward which all educated speakers strive" that's a bigoted view.

I'm well educated and in normal conversation I speak my local dialect, I'll say things like "he had callen him yesterday", or "that needs fixed".

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 08:04 PM

10. Clay Davis-stan



(I recently saw this when someone else posted it... gawd I love to hear this actor say this.)

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 08:44 PM

13. I like the Boston accent because it reminds me of the Kennedys. I've also been to Boston twice and

loved it.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 08:58 PM

14. gulf coast elite

unfortunately i speak hillbilly/scots irish/appalachian and no one can hardly understand me

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Response to pitohui (Reply #14)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 09:16 PM

16. I like the accents in CA (since we don't have accents) LOL! However, if I had to choose an actual

accent, I'd pick the Midwest.

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Response to nirvana555 (Reply #16)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 02:49 PM

31. I like California Valspeak and SurferDude - :)

I mean, in the movies only (think Spicoli), maybe not so much in real life, but defiantly very Californian.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 09:15 PM

15. all of them are interesting

 

the Scottish make me laugh, New Yorkers sound nasally and sick. Minnesotans and Canadians sound extra happy.
The English sound constipated... but their lower classes (Pikey, Cockney) sound scary (they scare me). Lol

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 09:27 PM

18. Who let the dugs owt?

They got owt of the howse.

Eastern Shore of Maryland.

Living nearby in the Warshington, DC, area in the great state of Murlin.

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Response to kwassa (Reply #18)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 04:20 PM

38. aw, hell-yeah

I lost most of my virginity to a girl from Baldemur, so that's a pleasant association.

But my personal fave is a soft, sultry Dixie accent from the mouth of a Southern belle.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 10:58 PM

23. I never realized how much I missed Texas accents

until I went back there a couple years ago after having been gone for more than 25 years.

But I actually enjoy listening to most all accents. I don't notice much of a southern accent here in Orlando but when I travel out to the swamps of south Florida I can hear it - it's still way different from Texas southern though.

Since I moved all over when I was young I seem to have picked up little or no accent - wherever I go people ask me where I'm from since I don't talk like them but I don't sound like anything else.

Except the one time I visited Maine to tour the HQ of a company I was working for and the warehouse guy said "Ayuh, I could tell you wah the Flah-da bah 'cause you talk funneh..."

My wife was born and raised in Orlando but I never really heard much accent in her except when we visit her relatives in Georgia - she totally starts talking in a Georgia southern accent and refuses to believe me when I point it out to her. It's pretty funny to me but I think she's annoyed by it.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 10:39 AM

24. N'Awlins Yat.....my go-to drunk dialect

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yat_dialect


Spent a chunk of my childhood in New Orleans

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Response to Burma Jones (Reply #24)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 12:16 PM

27. Merci, Baby.

I actually have a light Mississippi Coast accent but having lived in NO and being ass-over-teakettle in love with the place I love the Brooklyn-esque French influenced Southern "Where y'at?" accent as well. And hell yeah, it does drunk like no other.

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Response to Burma Jones (Reply #24)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 02:27 PM

29. That's the one

I try to make my mom say "under water", just to hear it in all its Yat glory

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 10:58 AM

25. I've been told I don't have much of an accent

And coming from NY, that says a lot.

However, as a small child, I was corrected if I "talked like a New Yorker."

I spent the spring in WI last year working on a recall, and the first thing they did upon my arrival was drill their way of pronouncing their state in my head. I later saw a friend I hadn't seen in awhile (after I returned to NJ) who had a friend with her that thought I was from WI.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 02:20 PM

28. That Southern lilt...

...particularly spoken by the women of Geneva, Alabama.

I have occasion to call a certain office there on the telephone from time to time, and I look forward to it every time, no matter which one answers.

I melt.




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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 02:39 PM

30. I'd have to say New England and Great Lakes are my two favorite.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 03:00 PM

32. Texan, and most of the rest of the South

I know it's probably not a popular choice due to the political leanings of the area...but there's something beautifully melodic about the dialects and accents, to my ear at least.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 03:00 PM

33. Not one person has mentioned the New York, Brooklyn, Bronx or Queens accent


How could you folks overlook our melodious accents?

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Response to Sanity Claws (Reply #33)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 03:19 PM

34. I do love the NYC / Boroughs accents.

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Response to Sanity Claws (Reply #33)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 04:26 PM

39. "Melodious"?

Ooooookay.

Not my first choice of adjective....but oooookay.

I once knew a woman from the Bronx. Listening to her speak made me want to drive knitting needles into my own ears, just to make it stop.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 04:13 PM

37. Buffalo

nt

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 06:13 PM

40. Whatever it was in the movie "Fargo." Is that Minnesota? Also, cajun accent. nt

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Response to Honeycombe8 (Reply #40)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 06:22 PM

41. Um...North Dakota?

But it's kinda Scandinavian.

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Response to Honeycombe8 (Reply #40)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 08:09 PM

43. Yup, I speak the Fargo Accent., Oh, and I live in Fargo, too!

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Response to Odin2005 (Reply #43)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 11:57 PM

46. That's it! N Dakota! So you live in Fargo? How cool is that? Literally cool.

Every time I see that movie, I love listening to the characters' accents. So unusual. I wonder what the history of that is. I know why Bostonites speak the way they do (I think). Dialects are interesting.

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Response to Honeycombe8 (Reply #46)

Sat Jan 7, 2012, 12:14 AM

47. The Upper Midwest was first settled by New Englanders

Older folks here will have accents influenced by German and Scandinavian immigration, but that is mostly gone in folks under 50. In fact, us folks under 30 are picking up elements of the Northern Cities Vowel Shift found in places like Detroit and Chicago. But unlike the folks around the Great Lakes, though like New Englanders and Canadians, we have the Cot-Caught merger, we pronounce "ah" and "aw" the same.

Also, we have the Flag-Plague merger, the short "a" sound (as in bat) becomes "ay" (as in bait) before g and ng.

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Response to Odin2005 (Reply #47)

Sun Jan 8, 2012, 02:51 PM

48. Interesting. Thanks for the info. I'll have to read up on this.

German/Scandinavian explains why I'm unfamiliar with the dialect. I haven't had many encounters with people of that ancestry, and those I have had, live in the south. (I'm from the deep south, of French ancestry.)

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Sun Jan 8, 2012, 03:19 PM

49. Coastal Southern -- particularly the Savannah variety.

Last edited Sun Jan 8, 2012, 04:59 PM - Edit history (1)

Now that I married a southern woman and our son speaks this way, I better love it.

Funny story. My son comes home from preschool with a new saying from his teacher. When a child is unhappy with something he or she got for lunch, she would say, "You get what you get and don't have a fit." And my wife said it was a nice rhyme.

I looked at her and said that it only rhymes in the south and she didn't get it for a long time.


As someone born and raised in northeastern NJ, I have always hated the Jersey accent. In high school, my friends and I would correct each other so that we didn't sound like that.




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