HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » The DU Lounge (Forum) » Dressing Properly for Job...
Introducing Discussionist: A new forum by the creators of DU

Tue Sep 18, 2012, 09:32 AM

Dressing Properly for Job Hunting -- Disagreement With My Nephew

My 21-year-old nephew will be living with us for a few months. He is looking for a job. He has little in the way of "nice clothes," so we spent quite a sum for him on chinos, polos, etc.

His primary way of looking for a job, besides going online, is to visit businesses and ask if they're hiring. He believes that he should "dress for the job" -- for example, if he's going to inquire at a lumber company, he should wear work boots, jeans, and a t-shirt.

He's not looking for an office or other such job, so I feel that for him to wear dress pants & shoes, a good shirt and tie would be too much. But for jobs like lumber yards, home improvement centers, Target-type places, grocery stores, etc., good pants (not jeans) and a polo shirt -- both properly pressed -- would do the trick.

We disagree and could find no common ground.

What do you think?

16 replies, 1849 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread

Response to Bertha Venation (Original post)

Tue Sep 18, 2012, 09:42 AM

1. a step up for every day wear. i do not care where a person is applying.

as both a parent and an owner of business and manager that hired.

though, sloppy wear did not stop me from hiring at one business cause desperate for employees and didnt expect much. low paying job.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bertha Venation (Original post)

Tue Sep 18, 2012, 09:46 AM

2. Dressing appropriately for the job he is seeking seems to be a good strategy.

As long as the clothes are clean, I think he'll be ok applying for a job wearing jeans.

Not too sure about the t-shirt, though.

A shirt with a collar wouldn't hurt.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bertha Venation (Original post)

Tue Sep 18, 2012, 10:05 AM

3. You are both right

the rule of thumb seems to be "one level up from what you would wear to work every day".

so for an office job, wear a suit. For a labor job, clean newer jeans and a nice shirt. Always scope out what the employees are wearing and go up one level

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bertha Venation (Original post)

Tue Sep 18, 2012, 10:17 AM

4. I personally think that no matter

what the job, a polo shirt and the chinos is good. For office jobs, a suit.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bertha Venation (Original post)

Tue Sep 18, 2012, 10:18 AM

5. I was always told to dress one up from the job

Dirty clothes = Clean cut clothes and a collared shirt
Collared Shirt and Pants = Dress Shirt and Slacks
Dress Shirt and Slacks = Coat and Tie

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bertha Venation (Original post)

Tue Sep 18, 2012, 10:20 AM

6. As someone who has managed that kind of retail:

A paint store, department store and a two restaurants...I used to circular-bin anybody who showed up to the interview dressed unprofessionally or sloppily. Having worked pretty much everywhere else you listed...I typically got hired by being the most well-dressed and professional-mannered applicant they ever saw. It never hurts to be slightly overdressed for a job interview.

It's pretty much the main reason I did interviews as a supervisor in those jobs, everything else I need to know is on the application for the most part. I might have one or two questions but for the most part I just wanted to get a gauge of the prospective employee's professionalism, both manner and dress. I don't need a paint showroom full of cursing foul-mannered grumpy sloppily-dressed salespeople; I want clerks and stockers that show me the skills that I can promote them in a pinch.

I'm never going to suggest he show up in wingtips for an interview to work in the lumberyard (a shirt and tie won't hurt his chances) but he might want to wear clean well-maintained boots or a solidly-built shoe, the jeans are out and a polo shirt is minimum. Most everybody working there, from the yardworkers to the salespeople, typically wears a polo shirt, usually employer-supplied. I wouldn't hire someone who showed up in a tee-shirt for any job interview unless I'd explicitly told them to wear one. They say to dress for the job you want, not the job you have...my advice since the job he's looking for is the lower-level job that he dress for the job most people in that position would like to be promoted to: sales or manager.

You want to impress in an interview. They'll tell you how to dress for work. Don't dress for work for the interview, you won't get hired.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Chan790 (Reply #6)

Tue Sep 18, 2012, 12:56 PM

10. Maybe it's different in industry, or just my interviewing technique

My stealth technique was to tour applicants through the plant, going through the test and assembly area, showing them the work that they might be doing, and guage their reaction. Then we have an intelligent, professional discussion about their philosipy of work - far away from HR, who thinks everyone in a blue collar is a dumbass.
And if they show up in a suit and tie, and office appropriate footwear - I gotta make 'em take off the tie and put on these goadawful toe caps make you look like Bozo. Part of the reason we hired the electrican (see other post), was that when we started the tour, the necktie was in the coat pocket in 1.3 seconds without a word.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bertha Venation (Original post)

Tue Sep 18, 2012, 10:21 AM

7. Former working foreman here

My bosses in that job were smart, and HR was a waste of air. The basic criteria we had on dress - wear what you would wear to look good on the job - but not for my bosses job!

I was in machine shop and assembly - and you're both right, kind of. For me, I'd like to see an applicant in appropriate footwear - meaning safety toes if the job requires them, and sneakers, hikers or work boots that are up to pounding concrete all day and don't make you look like an f'n bum. Jeans, cords or kakhis are good, NO HOLES (can get you a safety gig in these jobs) and pulled up over your ass! I'd go with the polo, an appropriate collared shirt, or MAYBE a NICE T-shirt - any graphic or slogan on said shirt should reflect well on the wearer and the job. No tanks or baby tees.

We only ever had 2 guys in suits apply. One showed up in his "Marry and Bury" suit - his own, well fitted (he was a big galoot, like me), looked comfortable - we hired a good electrican.
The other guy (can't make this shit up!) was wearing a brown leisure suit with Elvis hair and a half-gallon of cheeep cologne. Did'nt get the job.....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bertha Venation (Original post)

Tue Sep 18, 2012, 11:59 AM

8. Sorry, but I have to agree with him. You show up looking like the type of employee they want.

 

Wearing a suit and tie to a lumber yard is as bad as wearing boots, jeans, and a t-shirt to a cubicle farm job.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bertha Venation (Original post)

Tue Sep 18, 2012, 12:04 PM

9. I was always told to dress a little better than needed for the job you're applying for.

If the job requires wearing a polo shirt and khakis, wear a dress shirt & tie to the interview. If the job requires a tie, wear a tie and jacket to the interview.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Gidney N Cloyd (Reply #9)

Tue Sep 18, 2012, 01:02 PM

11. A little better- great.

A lot better, and you're interviewing for my boss's job - and we ain't hirin' for that!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bertha Venation (Original post)

Tue Sep 18, 2012, 01:11 PM

12. I read up recently on how to dress for interviewing.

What I read was...to take however the people at the company dress, for the job you're applying for, and dress one step up. The idea being you should look like you're trying to impress, which he is.

No jeans. No t-shirt.

I think your idea of good pants (khakis or business casual...not dress pants), shirt (polo or tucked in daily wear button down shirt), seems right. The important thing being...he should be exceptionally well groomed, look like he just stepped out of the shower, and his clothes pressed.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bertha Venation (Original post)

Wed Sep 19, 2012, 02:00 PM

13. I think you are okay in your assessment

 

though I'd still dress on the nicer end of scale to make a good first impression. So for the lumber yard job I go with newer work boots, newer jeans, and a button up shirt with collar. Nothing faded or ripped or worn. I also think khakis and a nice shirt would be fine too.

And for God's sake NO SAGGING. That is one of the fastest ways to a rejection. I'd hire someone with a tattoo on their forehead of Satan waving a swastika before I hire someone with their pants around their knees.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to guardian (Reply #13)

Wed Sep 19, 2012, 02:39 PM

14. I have a co-worker with almost that tattoo

We hire lots of people out of prison so we get lots of crappy tattoos...no swastika on this one but he does have the devil on his neck. Good worker.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jmowreader (Reply #14)

Wed Sep 19, 2012, 05:41 PM

15. My experience with ex-cons

 

as a landlord has been one of extremes. They are either

1) excellent tenants that work very hard to turn their life around and are quiet and respectful, or
2) they continue with crime as a way of life, violate the lease in multiple ways, bother the neighbors, don't pay rent, and get evicted.

Seems to be no in between. Unfortunately, the last 3 in a row I had cost me several thousand dollars in damages and endless headaches and worry, and vacancies because the neighbors didn't want to live next to them. So for now I am saying no to ex-cons. I can't afford more losses.

Though I got off relatively easy. The property owner next to mine recently spent $30,000 on remediation of a meth lab that a tenant ran out of his apartment building.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bertha Venation (Original post)

Wed Sep 19, 2012, 07:37 PM

16. Dress better than the other applicants.

Problem solved.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread