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Thu Aug 2, 2012, 07:45 PM

It's sad to watch a healthy 90' slash pine cut down for no good reason.

Right now, the last tree standing in my neighbor's back yard is being systematically and efficiently cut down. Not a single tree will be left in his yard! I see this happening more and more, with folks taking out natives and putting in small ornamental palms from other tropical places, as if Florida suburbs are interchangeable with Madagascar or someplace in Asia or South America. I have some native palms but also a row of a dozen 50' tall cedars along my back property line, some sea grape that's grown to 25', and two live oaks in the front that I planted as saplings about 20 years ago. They're at least 80 feet tall now and cast so much shade that the postman and other service folks park in front of my house to take their breaks. I also made a huge mistake of transplanting a ficus benjamina (houseplant) that outgrew its indoor pot about fifteen years ago. It's absolutely massive now and gorgeous, but it's roots will probably destroy my house (or a neighbor's) in another fifteen years. Oh well, I'll probably be gone by then or drooling in a nursing home.

On review of this, maybe it should be posted in the gardening group, but I'm too lazy to retype. Sorry.

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Reply It's sad to watch a healthy 90' slash pine cut down for no good reason. (Original post)
Ineeda Aug 2012 OP
truedelphi Aug 2012 #1
Honeycombe8 Aug 2012 #2
GoCubsGo Aug 2012 #3
Ineeda Aug 2012 #4
GoCubsGo Aug 2012 #6
Odin2005 Aug 2012 #5
pipi_k Aug 2012 #7

Response to Ineeda (Original post)

Thu Aug 2, 2012, 08:01 PM

1. I totally share your pain.

We live next door to a guy who will stop me on my way to the mailbox to tell me that my two perfectly healthy Ponderosa pines should be cut to the quick so as to fit into his notion of "Fire Safety." He cut down three huge pines on his property, and they were all diseased, probably from all the pesticides he uses.

Then he made two of those trees into benches, so there are these totally dried out "benches" that are about four feet in diameter, with seating cut into them, and about fifteen feet long. If dried out lumber like that isn't a fire danger I don't know what is.

You and I share the cedar thing-ee two. We have one in our side yard, and one in our back yard. They are something the birds like very much. I think mine are only about 40 feet high right now, though. They are both such beautiful trees.

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Response to Ineeda (Original post)

Thu Aug 2, 2012, 10:14 PM

2. It's a sin. What an idiot! nt

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Response to Ineeda (Original post)

Thu Aug 2, 2012, 10:36 PM

3. I was about to ask if you live in my neighborhood.

But, then I saw that you live in Florida. The only difference is that, in my neighborhood, they don't just take out the pines. Some of them take out the oaks, too. Then they put in a damn lawn. I have several slash pines on my small property, as well as Southern red oaks, water oaks, and a nice magnolia tree. They make so much shade in the back yard, that no grass will grow there. My back yard is all pine needles, as is the side yard on one side. And, I am sure my cooling bill is lower than all those people who are cutting down their trees.

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Response to GoCubsGo (Reply #3)

Thu Aug 2, 2012, 11:07 PM

4. Oh, yeah -- they take out everything, wanting that 'tropical look'

and, they think it will be less maintenance. But trees with extensive and/or deep root systems fare better in hurricanes than palms, which have tiny root systems. Although palms have a tendency to bend, not break, they are also easily uprooted. I have very little grass that I absolutely refuse to water or fertilize. I call the back yard 'the Mojave.' Your yard sound like it's right up my alley. I had a huge (messy) silk oak in the back when we bought this house 25+ years ago but it was sick and we had to have it taken out. We replaced it with a water oak which survives but isn't thriving, even after eighteen-twenty years. They have a tendency, I've been told, to rot from within. But it stays because the squirrels and birds like it. Someday, my yard might be their only nearby habitat and refuge. BTW, my yard is less than 10,000 sq. ft.

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Response to Ineeda (Reply #4)

Fri Aug 3, 2012, 08:13 AM

6. Oaks tend to grow rather slowly.

Not as rapidly as pines, anyway. The water oaks in my yard are in a spot where the soil is like concrete. Yet, they're doing just fine, but they haven't really grown tremendously in the 12 years I've lived here. But, neither have the red oaks. You are in the southernmost end of their range, so the growing conditions are likely not optimal for them. And, yes, they do rot from within, as lots of oaks do. If it's a big enough cavity, and has an opening to the outside, there is a possibility certain species of bats might roost in them. And that's a good thing.

We have one of those types in my neighborhood. They took out all of the trees and put in a lawn and an above-ground pool. They planted all sorts of tropical-looking plants, and I believe a a palmetto tree. This was a couple of years ago. They have to replace half of the plants every year, because the winter kills them. To each his own, I guess. I just hate it when people take out the native vegetation and put in non-native plants.

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Response to Ineeda (Original post)

Thu Aug 2, 2012, 11:51 PM

5. When I was a kid I would cry every I saw a perfectly healthy tree was cut down

It felt like murder to me.

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Response to Ineeda (Original post)

Fri Aug 3, 2012, 09:29 AM

7. There was a time

before this country was settled when a squirrel starting out on the eastern shores could travel to the Mississippi without ever setting foot on the ground, or so I read in a book on trees that I had. That's how dense the forests were.

I wish I could have seen it. I love trees.

Cutting down a tree for no reason is, IMO, a crime. What is this penchant people have for getting rid of the very thing that modifies the climate and clears out large quantities of carbon dioxide from the air? Often, when the people in the city are suffering in stifling hot temperatures, we are five to ten degrees cooler.

One example of tree murder which never made sense to me was when we sold our former home to people who had really wanted a brand new home, but settled for ours. The yard was full of trees...conifers, shade trees, fruit trees, etc.

The new owners had ALL of them cut down. AND...they covered the beautiful wood siding with crappy-ass yellow vinyl siding. To make it look like a home that had just been built in some kind of cheap development.

I cried.



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