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Tue Jun 19, 2012, 09:29 PM

So what's the fine for setting up traps to remove wildlife?

I was told by animal control that homeowners are not allowed to remove wildlife without a permit, and there's a fine if you do. Anyone have experience with this?

Is there a limit on what kind of animals can be removed?

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Arrow 19 replies Author Time Post
Reply So what's the fine for setting up traps to remove wildlife? (Original post)
Baitball Blogger Jun 2012 OP
Kaleva Jun 2012 #1
Baitball Blogger Jun 2012 #2
Kaleva Jun 2012 #4
RebelOne Jun 2012 #18
Baitball Blogger Jun 2012 #19
nolabear Jun 2012 #3
Kaleva Jun 2012 #5
Baitball Blogger Jun 2012 #7
Kaleva Jun 2012 #8
Baitball Blogger Jun 2012 #9
Baitball Blogger Jun 2012 #6
HopeHoops Jun 2012 #10
Baitball Blogger Jun 2012 #11
HopeHoops Jun 2012 #12
Baitball Blogger Jun 2012 #13
Maine-ah Jun 2012 #14
Baitball Blogger Jun 2012 #15
LynneSin Jun 2012 #16
Baitball Blogger Jun 2012 #17

Response to Baitball Blogger (Original post)

Tue Jun 19, 2012, 09:34 PM

1. This may be considered harsh by some, but they are just shot by the homeowner where I live.

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Response to Kaleva (Reply #1)

Tue Jun 19, 2012, 09:35 PM

2. Obviously there may be different rules for different States,

and certainly, different animals. I doubt anyone will be concerned about the removal of rats.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #2)

Tue Jun 19, 2012, 10:05 PM

4. Not many rats here. It's coyotes, skunks and raccoons.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #2)

Wed Jun 20, 2012, 01:39 PM

18. I had a pest control company not only remove the rats, but kill them.

My exterminator killed 17 rats in and under my house. I love animals, but when it comes to rats invading me, they sign their death warrant.

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Response to RebelOne (Reply #18)

Wed Jun 20, 2012, 01:54 PM

19. From what I understand about the Fish, Game ...

You can remove nuisance animals only by hiring animal removal firms which are licensed.

Which doesn't explain why there are so many traps available to purchase at the hardware stores.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Original post)

Tue Jun 19, 2012, 09:57 PM

3. What are we talking here?

Raccoon? Deer? Coyote? Bear?

I expect it varies a lot from state to state but in general killing wildlife of any kind is frowned on because of the potential for wounding and having a wounded, frightened animal running around (I'm leaving out personal feelings about it). It also varies from community to community. What's blind-eyed in the counry can get you in major trouble in the burbs.

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Response to nolabear (Reply #3)

Tue Jun 19, 2012, 10:06 PM

5. Best to check with local ordinances.

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Response to Kaleva (Reply #5)

Tue Jun 19, 2012, 10:14 PM

7. City and County ordinances?

If they don't blink for fraud and conspiracy, I don't think they'll give a hoot about animals. LOL!

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #7)

Tue Jun 19, 2012, 10:17 PM

8. Some of the larger towns where I live have ordinances against shooting guns within the limits.

If you live within a city, their ordinances will take precedence over the county ordinances.

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Response to Kaleva (Reply #8)

Tue Jun 19, 2012, 10:24 PM

9. Not always.

Trust me, Kaleva, in a Republican controlled area it's whatever they can get away with. County encroaches into the City and the City encroaches into the County. The only thing that tips you off to why these things happen, are the social relationships. (Beware the consensus builders)

Like I said, it's government by whatever they can get away with.

That's why State and Federal laws are the best option, if they have enforcement powers.

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Response to nolabear (Reply #3)

Tue Jun 19, 2012, 10:10 PM

6. Small mammals.

The only two nuisance animals around here are armadillos and rats. Raccoons occasionally.

From my observation racoons and rabbits are roamers. They don't stay in one place. Possums do stay in one place; and armadillos will stick around if you let them.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Original post)

Wed Jun 20, 2012, 10:47 AM

10. Depends on the state. In most places there isn't one if it is trap & release.

 

Feral cats usually qualify for wildlife, but such traps are usually used for spay/neuter and release programs. They're tough to domesticate. My kittens are from a feral mother who came inside to deliver and both still show some signs of being a bit wild. Groundhogs, raccoons, and skunks are generally fair game, but the latter two are high rabies risks. I'd bypass "animal control" and call your municipality's office directly to get the specifics on your state and local regulations.

I've got a hermaphrodite rabbit with no instincts other than to groom. I took him in as a small kit because he had no fear of humans, dogs, cats, or anything else. He's almost six now and a major cuddle, but he wouldn't have survived the night without my actions. It's totally illegal in my state but it was ethical. The vet felt the same way and treated the bite on his side despite the law (mother tried to kill him). Sometimes you just have to break the law.

Now that said, what state are you in and what critter are you trying to trap?


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Response to HopeHoops (Reply #10)

Wed Jun 20, 2012, 11:07 AM

11. In Florida.

I'm not trying to trap any. It's my neighbor. If he's trying to collect armadillos or rats to release somewhere else, I would be okay with that. But he doesn't have a good heart where it comes to my interest.

My concern is, there is a baby rabbit I have seen around and they die if they don't connect with their mother at least once a day. You see, they need to eat their mother's stools in order to get digestive enzymes in their stomachs. So you remove the mother too early, and the baby will die.

We don't have too many rabbits. You see them more readily around spring when they're having kits and have to cover lots of ground. They keep away from their their kits most of the time to keep them safe from predators.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #11)

Wed Jun 20, 2012, 11:21 AM

12. I'm not familiar with Florida laws on the subject. As for rabbits, I have a lot of experience.

 

As I mentioned, we have one (cottontail). They're EVERYWHERE around here. The mothers feed them at night, and yes, when they move from milk to solid food it is the bunny berries that the kits eat first. Rabbits have a two pass digestive system. The first pass breaks down the fibers and the second allows them to take in the nutrients.

My wife has pictures in her camera (haven't uploaded them yet) of a kit we had out a week ago. The neighbor's cat (same one that shits in my garden) is proficient at rabbit hunting. It got all of the kits but one from a warren in my next door neighbor's yard. I took it out and held it for a while as they were digging a hole ten feet away and transferring the fur from the first to the second. It was tiny and obviously still nursing. I'll recognize it - there was a white stripe on it's forehead. I really hope it made it. And touching them does NOT make the mother abandon them. That's a myth.

If the kit is old enough to eat solid food, you can take it in and feed it. Don't give it much spinach (too much iron), but kale and any greens but iceburg lettuce are good. They also need timothy hay. Even though most "pellets" are made of timothy hay you still need to give them the real deal once in a while. And the "they don't need water" thing is bullshit. They drink from a bowl and they self potty train. Once you take it in, you can't let it back out. It's a domestic pet at that point but they make excellent pets. Just arm yourself with a lot of Neosporin. You will get scratched. I've never been bitten by one but they all kick.

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Response to HopeHoops (Reply #12)

Wed Jun 20, 2012, 11:35 AM

13. I've only had one show an incredible fearlessness of humans.

We even took a couple of naps out on the lawn. Well, I was pretending to nap. The little guy was so lonely. You could tell he's always on such high alert that he didn't get much sleep. His body was quivering like it was the first time it got a chance to get into a REM state.

I try not to interfere too much because I fear I do more harm than good. We don't have that many around the neighborhood because of loss of habitat. When I do get one around, I try to feed him in the same spot. I buy those Kayte healthy bits. They really love those. And sometimes I buy the snack treat. They don't eat the timothy hay because it's dead and they have an entire yard to feed off in my backyard.

Except, this feeding cycle only works for about ten days. Predators catch on to the routine. I once saw a hawk move in just as I was putting the food down. I feed them, they eat them. And of course, putting out too much attracts raccoons and possums so I don't leave too much out there.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Original post)

Wed Jun 20, 2012, 12:16 PM

14. a friend's dog had managed to escape

one afternoon. The dog was gone for a week. He got his leg stuck in trap, and broke it, and the poor dog was stuck in the woods, no food, no water.

If you're going to trap, do it legally and humanely, or find someone who does.

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Response to Maine-ah (Reply #14)

Wed Jun 20, 2012, 12:26 PM

15. It's not my trap and fortunately, it's a hav-a-heart type.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Original post)

Wed Jun 20, 2012, 12:41 PM

16. Have you contacted your local state game commisson?

I think the 'no trapping' is more for the protection of the home owner and not the wildlife since most home owners don't have a clue how to handle wild life in general.

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Response to LynneSin (Reply #16)

Wed Jun 20, 2012, 12:57 PM

17. Fish, Game and Wildlife will probably resolve this matter.

Thanks.

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