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Fri May 4, 2012, 04:44 AM

Akita tries to attack a bear on the tv



This is actually pretty cool since Akitas were originally breed centuries ago to hunt bears.


8 replies, 6757 views

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Arrow 8 replies Author Time Post
Reply Akita tries to attack a bear on the tv (Original post)
TorchTheWitch May 2012 OP
NV Whino May 2012 #1
Brigid May 2012 #7
TorchTheWitch May 2012 #8
irisblue May 2012 #2
Major Nikon May 2012 #3
TorchTheWitch May 2012 #5
rrneck May 2012 #4
byeya May 2012 #6

Response to TorchTheWitch (Original post)

Fri May 4, 2012, 11:01 AM

1. Cat attacks dog on TV

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Response to NV Whino (Reply #1)

Fri May 4, 2012, 07:47 PM

7. So Akitas were bred to hunt bears?

Apparently this one knows that.

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Response to Brigid (Reply #7)

Fri May 4, 2012, 09:11 PM

8. as a general hunting dog but more specifically to hunt bear

The Akita Prefecture of Japan (for which the breed is named for) is very mountainous and very cold. Many centuries ago bears made the best game for the amount of meat and the thick fur hides for the people of the small scattered villagers that lived in the region. A hunting dog was needed that was large, solid, strong and generally fearless that was thickly furred to deal with the cold and rugged to deal with the terrain. Two Akitas could hold off and corner a bear for quite some time until the hunters got there to kill it. To the Japanese particularly back then their dogs were workers - not pets - their size and strength was necessary to haul back the catch to the village. But because they were not seen as pets, in extreme winters sadly they were used for food and hides when hunting became very lean.

But the Akita eventually earned it's place as a necessary part of the family as they made great protection dogs whether from marauders from other villages or from animal predators, but they also are very family oriented dogs bonding very strongly to their human families and naturally babysat the kids of the busy mothers. Even today Japanese mothers use their Akitas to help out with watching the kids.

Interestingly, the first Akita into the US was given as a gift to Helen Keller when she visited the Akita Prefecture after hearing of the popular story at the time of the famed Akita, Hachiko, that waited at the train station every day for his master to come home from work (there is still a statue of Hachiko at the train station in his memory and is still shiny around the head area because everyone pets the statue for good luck). Sadly, the dog, named Kamikaze-go, died not very long after of distemper. Upon hearing of how much she loved the dog and how upset she was about his death the Japanese government then sent her Kamikaze's older brother, Kenzan-go, as an official gift from the government. She was rarely seen without her Akita with her.

It was after World War II that Akitas started really coming to the US. US servicemen fell in love with the breed and many of them brought them home from the war and started their own breeding programs. More recently, the Akita split into two slightly different style's - the American style and the Japanese style, though interestingly it is the American style that more closely represents the original breed from centuries ago. The American style is generally bulkier with a more boxy snout and except for pure white Akitas has the black mask. This is due to the Mastiff breed bred into them for size and strength. The Japanese style is lighter and more streamlined with less bulk, no black mask and a more pointy fox-like snout. This style more resembles the Japanese smaller cousin of the Akita, the Shiba Inu, in looks but not size, which is due to having bred out most of the Mastiff qualities.

This is the Japanese style Akita...



And this is the American style Akita...



And here are some adorable Akita puppies to gush over just because they're so damn adorable...










And that's my Akita lecture. Refreshments available in the lobby, and please send cash, only - no personal checks accepted.

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Response to TorchTheWitch (Original post)

Fri May 4, 2012, 01:08 PM

2. that was neat

thanks for the video.

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Response to TorchTheWitch (Original post)

Fri May 4, 2012, 02:04 PM

3. My male border collie does this

He's lunged at the TV a few times. Horses, cows, and sheep especially drive him nuts (herding instinct). My Dog Skip is his favorite movie.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #3)

Fri May 4, 2012, 05:29 PM

5. All of mine were fascinated by horses but no other animals

Especially if they're running or making noise. Kind of weird because only the first Akita ever saw a real horse before. They even try to check behind the tv to try to figure out how to get to the horses. They could care less about any other animals on the tv though and I watch a lot of nature programs. Expect Yoshi (the one I have now) was terrified of the herd of running buffalo in Dances with Wolves... he raced to the sofa and climbed me like a tree... "Save me from the big scary beasts charging at me on the tv, Mommy!" Goofy dog.


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Response to TorchTheWitch (Original post)

Fri May 4, 2012, 03:22 PM

4. Honey Akita don't care. nt

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Response to TorchTheWitch (Original post)

Fri May 4, 2012, 05:54 PM

6. My bullmastiff used to lunge at the tv when an animal came on,

 

get frustrated and go into the next room behind the tv, get frustrated and then go lay down in the
hall when she couldn't find the animal in the "window"
We stopped watching DVDs and video tapes with animals in them to spare the dog's feelings.

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