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Sun Feb 10, 2013, 07:07 PM

Seems odd. Chicago police will no longer respond to 911 calls for robberies and car thefts.



That seemed so odd that having your home robbed or your car stolen would not bring the police at once. There are several other instances listed, but these two seem to me to be very necessary.

I found another source to be sure.

Chicago Police Changing Response Plan For Some 911 Calls

CHICAGO (CBS) – Starting this week, Chicago police are changing their responses to 911 calls. They’ll no longer come right away to reports of things like criminal damage to property, vehicle thefts, garage burglaries, or other crimes in which the suspect is no longer on the scene, and the victim isn’t in immediate danger.

..."Police Supt. Garry McCarthy insisted crime prevention “in the future” happens when officers are on patrol, not tied up taking reports at the scene of non-violent incidents.

“I don’t mean to be flippant here, because I’ve been the victim of a burglary at least three or four times,” he said. “I’d rather have the officer on street, where he can prevent the shooting.”




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Arrow 29 replies Author Time Post
Reply Seems odd. Chicago police will no longer respond to 911 calls for robberies and car thefts. (Original post)
madfloridian Feb 2013 OP
msongs Feb 2013 #1
JimDandy Feb 2013 #2
plethoro Feb 2013 #3
mucifer Feb 2013 #15
plethoro Feb 2013 #16
madfloridian Feb 2013 #17
TheMastersNemesis Feb 2013 #4
ancianita Feb 2013 #5
2naSalit Feb 2013 #6
ancianita Feb 2013 #7
ancianita Feb 2013 #8
2naSalit Feb 2013 #11
ancianita Feb 2013 #14
2naSalit Feb 2013 #20
napoleon_in_rags Feb 2013 #27
freshwest Feb 2013 #9
AsahinaKimi Feb 2013 #10
cartach Feb 2013 #24
DeSwiss Feb 2013 #12
2naSalit Feb 2013 #21
me b zola Feb 2013 #13
PDJane Feb 2013 #18
Ken Burch Feb 2013 #19
DeSwiss Feb 2013 #29
PennsylvaniaMatt Feb 2013 #22
cartach Feb 2013 #23
Smilo Feb 2013 #25
madfloridian Feb 2013 #26
Smilo Feb 2013 #28

Response to madfloridian (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 07:12 PM

1. same pay, less work. nt

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Response to madfloridian (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 07:35 PM

2. Sounds like an opening for private detective work.

Citizens are going to need PIs to look for latent fingerprints and do investigative work at robbery crime scenes when the police refuse to come.



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Response to madfloridian (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 07:35 PM

3. In many major cities it is becoming too dangerous for police to

 

be in the wrong place. With arms coming in from Mexico and SA, the bad guys are getting armed pretty good. With these drones, I'm sure they'll get their own SAMS. George's Bush's plunder into Iraq has cost the US dearly, and I will stick to my forecast that Iraq was to the US as Parthia was to Rome.

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Response to plethoro (Reply #3)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 08:24 PM

15. No, they will actually be involved in MORE dangerous work.

They will be responding to violent crimes NOT nonviolent crimes.

Of course it would be better to just hire more police. But, privatizing the schools takes priority and costs money.

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Response to mucifer (Reply #15)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 08:35 PM

16. Yes. Until they start throwing in the towel. I don't know how bad it is where you

 

Last edited Sun Feb 10, 2013, 09:05 PM - Edit history (1)

live, but here in Long Beach folks stay in their houses after dark, Glocks on the dining room table.

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Response to mucifer (Reply #15)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 08:35 PM

17. Very good point. It does take money...

to privatize the schools or in fact to privatize anything. Since Jeb decided that empty government buildings were best, the people pay more for private companies to do services. I can't help but think of the thousands of dollars districts pay for TFA to recruit teachers when there are laid off teachers waiting for jobs. And they cost nothing to recruit.

They think we are stupid, and I guess we are to keep letting them do the same things over and over.

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Response to madfloridian (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 07:36 PM

4. Sign Of The Times.People Don't Want To Pay For The Services & Support Letting Rich Off The Hook

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Response to madfloridian (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 07:37 PM

5. Let's just tell all robbers -- individual and 'investigative' that it's open season

on people's homes and cars. All because CPD is too cheap to have civilian report transcribers of oral reports from crime scenes. This country has become the Wild West. The unarmed and uninsured are on their own. Tough shit, Chicago taxpayers.

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Response to madfloridian (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 07:44 PM

6. It also serves the insurance industry

cabal. You can't file a claim without a police report. So you end up paying insurance fees that end up being a hole in your pocket instead of financial protection for loss... which is what insurance is supposed to be for. This also makes the middle income population, what's left of it, more vulnerable such that a robbery can cast more people into impoverished ruination which adds to the number of people who will be more desperate and hungry... and that seems to be the goal of the greedy. How dare any of we commonfolk assume that we have equal rights or attempt to aspire to upward social and financial mobility.

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Response to 2naSalit (Reply #6)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 07:52 PM

7. Guess I have to have a gun ready.

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Response to madfloridian (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 07:53 PM

8. Fuck Rahm Emanuel. He can afford what he wants to afford. He's GOT to be a one-term mayor. nt

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Response to ancianita (Reply #8)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 08:04 PM

11. No doubt.

He sucks as a mayor and probably at everything else too, well, except being a foul mouthed bully. Everybody is good at something. He and Christy should start a club for their kind, then we can isolate them ignore them.

I think that the signs are clearly point we little people to adopt a system where money no longer serves as currency. That way we can move forward with important issues and restructure the world to a more sustainable lifestyle for more of us. Like I said, everybody is good at something and if these talents/skills become more like currency than the nebulous "cash"... we might have a fighting chance. Too many important elements of the social contract have been co-opted or eliminated that we need to do something and soon. George Orwell's predictions are here, both 1984 and Animal Farm.

A sad time for our democracy and our species. We seem to be facing the unraveling of our social contract and it's not going to get any prettier as we go on until we all decide to make it different.

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Response to 2naSalit (Reply #11)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 08:20 PM

14. I buy into this. Instituting a People's Currency is a good idea. People's Banks, credit unions, etc.

People's farms, stores, trucking, distribution of products, etc. People's medical clinics. People's jobs. People's schools. Public universities could also return. If two-tier is what the 1% want, we'll show them what the hell two tier looks like. Let the 1% beware the source of their wealth. It can end up being a full time endeavor for The People, but what the hell more do they have to lose.

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Response to ancianita (Reply #14)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 09:20 PM

20. Precisely.

If there aren't any jobs for pay then we have all that time to invest our personal energy into creating a new way to support ourselves. They can't force us to work at jobs that don't exist. I think the biggest hurdle will be to get the militarized factions to not brutalize us for taking care of ourselves instead of using our lives to pamper the wealthy. I think most everyone else will work for food and shelter, especially if it's on their own terms. When we stop buying the crap they have brainwashed us into finding a need for, they will get the hint. OWS was a good indication that there is a large portion of the population who aren't into the "game" anymore and want out or something different. If the money wavers don't have serfs they are SOL. All we have to do is convince those who would be thinking they could get rich by doing the bidding of the money wavers that the money isn't recognized anymore, it might help them refuse to participate as serfs too.

There's got to be a way, our governing folks won't ever go that route unless we force them to, and since there are far more of us, it can happen here.

for reference:


http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/thu-february-7-2013/exclusive---neil-barofsky-extended-interview-pt--1


http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/thu-february-7-2013/exclusive---neil-barofsky-extended-interview-pt--2

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Response to 2naSalit (Reply #20)

Mon Feb 11, 2013, 03:11 AM

27. I just figured out yesterday what a MAMMOTH force debt is.

$50 trillion in private+public debt in the US, and only $10 trillion money in existence. But more important are the measures of wealth:

All residential real estate in US: $20 trillion.
http://www.mybudget360.com/the-balance-sheet-recession-42-trillion-lost-in-residential-real-estate-value-yet-mortgage-debt-down-by-140-billion/

So just think about that for a minute - if all the homes, apartments trailer homes, condos in the US, owned by anybody were given to the banks, that would only take care of HALF of the total debt, or about 65% of the private debt. In fact the Fed (see link above) says 10.4 trillion in mortgage debt alone: So banks basically own half of all property, and then the people in it have all kinds of other debts, credit cards and the like which place further claims on their wealth. (a lot of the 50 trillion must be business debt) I found another source that puts the total wealth (not money, wealth all the things and their values) at $188 trillion.
http://rutledgecapital.com/2009/05/24/total-assets-of-the-us-economy-188-trillion-134xgdp/
So banks own more than a fourth and less than a third of everything in existence, and with interest rates, that number is constantly growing.

What's really interesting though is that the total US assets are just 13.4 times GDP. Which means that 13.4 years is enough time to make everything in US again. But things fade, things go away.

My girlfriend wears these pants her grandfather wore in WWII, wool deals with big buttons. They still look fine. She lets me use his old razor, its as good as any Schick Quattro or whatever, and it has lasted 7 decades. Yet my Ross clothes fall apart in several months, and my fancy razors break.

So long as the people cannot accumulate lasting, sustainable wealth, we will be slaves to the financial oppression.

Thus I believe the revolutionary consumer has their eyes on the 100 year lifespan of all that they buy, demanding quality things, built with a verifiable science that promises their long life. We must turn our backs on planned obsolescence and the disposable culture, and make ourselves real accumulators of wealth. Better to rule in a tiny castle that will last 200 years that a disposable McStyrofoam mansion. Better to lay down a legacy for future generations than to grab on to passing fads and fleeting comforts!

Okay, rant over!
Peace!

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Response to madfloridian (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 07:58 PM

9. Years ago in Houston, it was the same. Many states refuse to come out for non-violent offenses.

All property matters to be taken care of with exchange of insurance information or calling an adjuster. They may come out eventually for a non-violent burglary, but seldom do any investigation, leaving the homeowner to prove their loss to their insurance company. That was my experience anyway, I'm surprised that Chicago had the manpower to go out for all of these all these years. YMMV.

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Response to madfloridian (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 08:04 PM

10. This is the most

ridicules thing I have ever heard. I hope it does not become a trend in San Francisco.

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Response to AsahinaKimi (Reply #10)

Mon Feb 11, 2013, 02:00 AM

24. It probably already is

and maybe not having been a victim you're not even aware of it. The original poster seems unwilling to consider who's paying for all the extra and basically unnecessary work for law enforcement. A knee jerk reaction!

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Response to madfloridian (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 08:07 PM

12. K&R

Your Fascist Superheroes


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Response to DeSwiss (Reply #12)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 09:31 PM

21. Ayuh!

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Response to madfloridian (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 08:14 PM

13. I imagine it will depend upon *whom* is being robbed and whose car has been stolen

but then again, maybe not too much of a change after all?

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Response to madfloridian (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 09:12 PM

18. Police won't respond to those here, either.

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Response to madfloridian (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 09:19 PM

19. What about robberies at donut shops? n/t.

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Response to Ken Burch (Reply #19)

Mon Feb 11, 2013, 12:52 PM

29. Inside job. n/t

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Response to madfloridian (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 09:51 PM

22. Since this discussion was on Fox, I'm SHOCKED they didn't blame President Obama!

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Response to madfloridian (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2013, 01:53 AM

23. Live in a rural area for a while,

and you'll get used to it. Moved from the city to rural and soon realized that lack of immediate response to most 911 non violent property crimes where victims were not present when they were committed was well justified considering the distances and times involved to get to the scene. Time was better used by those law enforcement on patrol being made aware of any particulars obtained over the phone so they could keep an eye out for any suspicious vehicles,people etc. Having been the victim a couple of times I was ticked off the first time when police didn't show up and I had to phone back for an incident report for insurance purposes. After it was explained and thinking about it, when it happened the second time my attitude was " go get the bad guys and if I have to talk to you I can do it later". The alternative is of course is an exorbitant increase in the cost of law enforcement and no improvement in results. I guess city folks are just catching on to this and I expect costs will go down considerably with no negatives.

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Response to madfloridian (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2013, 02:07 AM

25. They do this in the UK

while it may seem terrible, there is no point in sending out an emergency response unit for something that has already happened and the perps have left the scene. The police can't do anything anyway except take reports.

Far better to have them out and about on the streets able to respond and possibly deter crimes from happening.



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Response to Smilo (Reply #25)

Mon Feb 11, 2013, 02:24 AM

26. When do they come and check for evidence at the robbery scene.

Last I heard that matters. One person I know had windows and a door damaged, what if the police did not come to check for fingerprints, etc? Here they respond quickly for break-ins.

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Response to madfloridian (Reply #26)

Mon Feb 11, 2013, 11:11 AM

28. Not always - it depends where you live on how

quickly they respond here - as others have posted if you are rural, you may have to wait a good long time before the police can get to you.

Here is an article on the London Metropolitan police response times from Wikipedia - think you will find it informative:

Graded response
Once the initial information has been inputted, the CAD will be allocated a grade of urgency. All calls are given one of five grades:

I grade ("immediate response") — calls which in the operator's opinion constitute a genuine emergency. The target response time for all "I" graded calls is within 15 minutes, and in any event to be attended as soon as possible.
S grade ("significant priority") — these are calls which, in the operator's opinion, do not constitute a genuine emergency but nonetheless need to be attended as soon as possible. To preserve forensic opportunities or to maintain public confidence "S" grade calls must be answered within 60 minutes. All "S" graded calls are intended to be attended within one hour; however, in practice many of these calls are ignored for some time due to pressure on resources caused by "I" graded calls.
E grade ("extended time") — these are calls which in the operator's opinion require attendance, but for various reasons do not require a response target time. The grade is most frequently used when the caller has indicated that they are unavailable and an agreement is made to attend at a later date.
R grade (referred) — all calls which in the operator's opinion do not require any response; mainly either calls where the operator has offered advice and this has resolved the problem, or duplicate calls to incidents of which the police are already aware and dealing.
Once the CAD report has been created, it is passed to the relevant Dispatch for the borough in question to decide what officers to deploy to it. The Supervisor (see below) can change the grading of the call if necessary, but only in exceptional circumstances.

During the programme transition there were a number of challenges with late technology and the preparedness of staff to work in the new environment, and not all performance targets were met. As the new OCU bedded down, performance consolidated and the command now achieves all of the national call handling targets set by the Home Office through the HMIC and NPIA.

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