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Sun Jan 20, 2013, 10:14 PM

Semi-Automatic weapons are harmless (guy turns AR 15 into rapid firing weapon)

unless ya have a rubber band and/or know how to handle the gun in improper ways..then hello rapid fire gun!




BTW, the person turned off embedding when they realised people were using their video negatively against guns..
so youll have to click on the link and go to youtube..

or just go to youtube and search for "AR 15 Rubber Band"

39 replies, 3710 views

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Reply Semi-Automatic weapons are harmless (guy turns AR 15 into rapid firing weapon) (Original post)
iamthebandfanman Jan 2013 OP
cantbeserious Jan 2013 #1
Schema Thing Jan 2013 #2
iamthebandfanman Jan 2013 #4
Schema Thing Jan 2013 #21
PatrynXX Jan 2013 #11
bossy22 Jan 2013 #31
Schema Thing Jan 2013 #37
WhoIsNumberNone Jan 2013 #3
SunSeeker Jan 2013 #5
AtheistCrusader Jan 2013 #8
SunSeeker Jan 2013 #12
AtheistCrusader Jan 2013 #18
SunSeeker Jan 2013 #20
oldbanjo Jan 2013 #24
AtheistCrusader Jan 2013 #36
SunSeeker Jan 2013 #6
Deep13 Jan 2013 #7
AtheistCrusader Jan 2013 #10
Deep13 Jan 2013 #16
AtheistCrusader Jan 2013 #19
PatrynXX Jan 2013 #9
Deep13 Jan 2013 #17
JackInGreen Jan 2013 #38
zebonaut Jan 2013 #13
PatrynXX Jan 2013 #15
PatrynXX Jan 2013 #14
Ashgrey77 Jan 2013 #22
geckosfeet Jan 2013 #23
MynameisBlarney Jan 2013 #25
bossy22 Jan 2013 #30
MynameisBlarney Jan 2013 #33
MynameisBlarney Jan 2013 #34
James48 Jan 2013 #26
LineLineReply .
Iggo Jan 2013 #27
Turbineguy Jan 2013 #28
bossy22 Jan 2013 #29
naaman fletcher Jan 2013 #32
Ed Suspicious Jan 2013 #35
JackInGreen Jan 2013 #39

Response to iamthebandfanman (Original post)

Sun Jan 20, 2013, 10:52 PM

1. The Madness Of America's Gun Culture On Display For All To Witness

eom

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Response to iamthebandfanman (Original post)

Sun Jan 20, 2013, 10:52 PM

2. this not a "gotcha' moment against AR-15's though.



And here's why:


Semi-automatics are more lethal the contrived full automatics.


Think about it... if Adam Lanza had just sprayed bullets, some of those kids would very likely still be alive. But he didn't just *spray* bullets, he quickly but carefully fired single bullets as fast as he wanted/could pull the trigger until he was sure each target was not just hit, but dead.


The "AR-15" is just one of many weapons with TOO.FUCKING.MUCH lethality for civilians to wield.

Limit:

How many Bullets before having to reload.

Speed of reload.

Speed of firing.

Access to ammunition.


Don't get hung up on names (AR-15) ("assault weapon"). Don't get hung up on gimmicks like bump firing. It may make a weapon more likely to cause accidental injury, but it doesn't make the weapon more lethal to the public.... because, my god, the weapon almost couldn't be more lethal to the public exactly as it is with high capacity quick change magazines.

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Response to Schema Thing (Reply #2)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 12:18 AM

4. in that instance, sure

but say he was at a large music concert...
or a play...
or a movie...
anywhere with dense people...
ive been shoulder to shoulder with people at concerts before.. thousands of us.

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Response to iamthebandfanman (Reply #4)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 01:50 AM

21. and even in those circumstances bullets aimed are far more deadly

than bullets sprayed.


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Response to Schema Thing (Reply #2)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 01:05 AM

11. although the automatic

that Rachel had shown on tv made from a laser and plastic worked well enough untill it fell to pieces

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Response to Schema Thing (Reply #2)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 09:17 AM

31. speed of firing?

speed of firing is the same in basically all semi autos- they will fire as quick as you can pull the trigger


Any gun can be lethal- especially in the circumstances that most mass shootings occur (closed in area with few egresses). You can do considerable damage in a closed in space with "grandpas shotgun".


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Response to bossy22 (Reply #31)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 11:32 AM

37. yes, we ALL know that "any gun can be lethal".

There will never again be an appropriate or necessary time for you to point that out. Not for the rest of your life. It truly goes w/o saying. You aren't being more clever than the person you are talking to; they too know that "any gun can be lethal" just as knives and hammers and bricks can be lethal.

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Response to iamthebandfanman (Original post)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 12:04 AM

3. A friend of mine used to get these mail order gun catalogs

You could order semi-automatic AR-15s, UZIs and AK-47s. On the next page they had full-automatic conversion kits for AR-15s, UZIs and AK-47s. All with disclaimers that read (essentially) 'not to be used for converting weapons to full automatic'. Now, this was in the early 90s, and this sort of thing may have since been outlawed, but as I understand it, if you know what you're doing it's not hard to convert these weapons to full auto without a kit. All you need is a metal file.

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Response to WhoIsNumberNone (Reply #3)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 12:20 AM

5. Yup. It's called an "Drop In Auto Sear."

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Response to SunSeeker (Reply #5)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 12:59 AM

8. Any made after 1986 carry a 10 year in federal prison price tag.

Hard to explain at the range when you go full auto, with an unregistered machine gun.

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Response to AtheistCrusader (Reply #8)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 01:07 AM

12. They way those boys chortled when their AR went full auto, I think they'd risk it.

And they'd shoot it in the woods, like in this video, not at a range.

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Response to SunSeeker (Reply #12)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 01:30 AM

18. Game wardens and forest rangers have full arrest powers.

I don't know how much time you spend in the woods, but they pay attention to the popular gravel pits and shooting spots, and they DO check people's weapons. (They also arrest some for drinking while in possession of a firearm)

(The poster I responded to was talking about a DIAS, not a rubber band bump firing idiocy) That weapon didn't fire in full auto. He is holding the rifle loose in his hand, so the rubber band, and the kinetic recoil of the weapon ends up jacking the weapon back and forth in his hand, such that the trigger is pulled repeatedly, faster than a human would normally pull it.

And that is why these assholes never show themselves shooting at anything like a target, because they can't hit shit the way they are holding the gun. It's purely juvenile thrill only, and it's one stroke of the pen by the BATFE away from being a federal felony.

No law needs to be passed to deal with this. The BATFE has only to say that this constitutes modifying a firearm to fire full auto, and bam, that guy is holding an unregistered machine gun in his hands, even after removing the rubber band. Call the BATFE. Call the White House to lean on the BATFE. We don't even have to bring it up with Congress to end this.

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Response to AtheistCrusader (Reply #18)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 01:39 AM

20. We need a lot more forest rangers, and we need the ATF nominee confirmed. nt

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Response to AtheistCrusader (Reply #18)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 07:39 AM

24. Bull, you don't need a rubber band and it is legal,

you can change the stock and make it accurate and the stock HAS been approved by the ATF.

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Response to oldbanjo (Reply #24)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 11:28 AM

36. For now.

But the stock, like the rubber band and shoestring methods, have removed the possibility of hitting anything with the rifle, as well. It's not the equivalent of a DIAS to go true burst or full auto, in which you firmly hold the weapon, and can direct fire so long as you can control muzzle rise.

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Response to iamthebandfanman (Original post)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 12:21 AM

6. Sick Mofo's.

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Response to iamthebandfanman (Original post)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 12:48 AM

7. That's a violation of Federal law and not a small one either.

Seriously, even though it is just a rubber band, it counts as a modification which makes that a machine gun.

Without a class III license (and who has one of those?) this guy is looking at serious time.

There is a way to do that without modification, colloquially called "bump fire." They are a bit hard to control that way since one is using his trigger hand to provide the elasticity that the rubber band in the original example provides. Have no fear, technology is here!

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Response to Deep13 (Reply #7)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 01:03 AM

10. Unclear.

They ruled the shoestring method a machine gun, then withdrew it. The Rubber Band method hasn't been ruled on yet, to my knowledge.

I hope they do rule it so, because it's a dumb thing to do anyway.

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Response to AtheistCrusader (Reply #10)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 01:17 AM

16. Didn't know they changed their minds.

Wow. We'll see, I guess.

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Response to Deep13 (Reply #16)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 01:31 AM

19. I think it's worth writing the white house about it.

It would be nice if it was near the top of the list of issues for the incoming new director of the BATFE to deal with.

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Response to iamthebandfanman (Original post)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 01:01 AM

9. been pointing this video out to rachel for several weeks

called bump firing. and that was declared illegal in 2009. but there's a bouncy stock now that is legal. just bounces off your shoulder and it's legal bump firing. which is basically still totally automatic..

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Response to PatrynXX (Reply #9)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 01:21 AM

17. Not defending it, but to be very technical it isn't full auto.

Full auto uses the recoil energy or hot gases eject the case, load the next cartridge, and fire it. In bump fire, it is pressure from the shooter's hand that does the last step.

Still pretty dangerous, though. Jesus, who can afford to burn through ammunition like that? The stuff doesn't grow on trees.

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Response to Deep13 (Reply #17)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 12:40 PM

38. Probably the same cats

I used to hang out with that worked in programming, IT, or tech support who would order cases at low dollar (misremember exacts) online.

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Response to iamthebandfanman (Original post)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 01:10 AM

13. Patriots? How about losers

Oh; that stupid sht eating grin

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Response to zebonaut (Reply #13)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 01:16 AM

15. well yeah

on it's face the video is probably done by a bunch of folks who know what they are doing. problem is. well they probably know this isn't good so like anyone firing of say a mortar like a firework mortar like ahem uh that fires a nice tennis ball up in the air and poof a flower. oh well was lucky I wasn't caught it was a 50/50 legal question mark in Wisconsin. because black cat did these license things that one fires off in a certain park and viola fireworks. was only $20 though. but well worth the smirk. and certainly more fun than fucking a gun.. That was a long time ago. also learned how to be safe around fireworks. ie always light via lighter and make sure lighter is like a foot long. Round here SMoke bombs are about the only legit thing to make a mess with.. no bb guns. although mines just a lever action one. no CO2 canister

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Response to iamthebandfanman (Original post)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 01:11 AM

14. comments have gotten alot worse too

like I'm surprised that hasn't been flagged yet. sheesh. oh sure violence isn't flagged but Pussy is blurred (by Rammstein) but not word censored. and flagged. If there's something sexual about it it's flagged. But showing off a cheap way of irritating the cops. have a ball..

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Response to iamthebandfanman (Original post)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 04:19 AM

22. It's called "bump firing"

It's a real good way to wear your barrel out and burn up all your ammo while not being able to hit the broad side of a barn.

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Response to iamthebandfanman (Original post)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 07:17 AM

23. No firearm is harmless.

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Response to iamthebandfanman (Original post)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 08:44 AM

25. I was up until the wee hours this morning

watching videos like this one.
Some are much much more disconcerting. And there are a LOT of them.

There's one that stands out though. It shows how to use an oil filter for a car or truck to make a silencer, it included an adapter that was "ATF approved".

Why would any civilian need a silencer or "suppressor" as they kept calling it?

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Response to MynameisBlarney (Reply #25)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 09:12 AM

30. noise reduction while hunting and target shooting

It actually is quite common place in the some european countries

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suppressor#Europe


Despite popular belief, a silencer doesnt make your gun "silent". In fact, youtube it and you will "see" that there is still a large "bang" that you can hear. In fact, IMO I would like to see them loosen up the restriction on silencers and start offering them for rent at outdoor ranges. You would be able to reduce the noise so the residents in the surrounding area wouldn't complain as much.

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Response to bossy22 (Reply #30)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 09:27 AM

33. I find that hard to believe

I've been hunting, though not regularly, for most of my life. And not one of the people I've ever gone hunting with has ever mentioned the need for a suppressor. Though, I do wish the cops at the shooting range not far from the house would use them. Because I do not particularly care to be awakened by the sound of automatic gunfire on weekend mornings.
And yes, I realize that they do not make the gun silent.

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Response to bossy22 (Reply #30)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 09:32 AM

34. And seriously, these guns they were demonstrating the

suppressor with were in no way, shape or form ever used for hunting.
.22 cal semi-automatic pistols and AK-47's aren't very commonly used for hunting.

The more people claim "it's for hunting" the more ridiculous it sounds.

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Response to iamthebandfanman (Original post)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 08:48 AM

26. Names of those killed at Sandyhook

Charlotte Bacon, 6

Charlotte was sweet, outgoing and full of energy, her grandmother told CNN affiliate WCCO in Minnesota.

"This is tough. This is surreal. You can't believe this could happen," Irene Hagen told the network. "The whole family is just devastated and we're all trying to come to terms with it."

She said her granddaughter loved school and dresses. Her hair was a mass of beautiful red curls.

"It's horrible. It's really horrible," Hagen told WCCO. "It's hard to believe that someone would kill children, innocent children."

Rachel D'Avino, 29

She likely didn't know it when she died, but her best friend was about to propose.

He had recently asked Rachel's parents for permission, and he was planning to ask for her hand in marriage on Christmas Eve.

That and other details about Rachel's life were described in an obituary posted on the website of Munson-Lovetere Funeral Homes of Connecticut.

"Her presence and tremendous smile brightened any room she entered," it read.

Born in Waterbury, Rachel received her undergraduate degree from the University of Hartford and her Masters from Post University. She was working toward her Doctorate at the University of St. Joseph of Hartford.

Rachel loved karate, cooking, animals, photography and her two younger siblings.

"Her passion, however, was her occupation as a behavioral therapist working with children within the autism spectrum," the obituary read.

In lieu of flowers, it asked that donations be made to Autism Speaks, an advocay organization.

Olivia Engel, 6

Her favorite stuffed animal was a lamb; pink and purple were her favorite colors.

Olivia's family posted a statement on Facebook with those and other details about their beloved daughter.

"She was insightful for her age and had a great sense of humor. She laughed a lot and always lit up a room including the people around her. She was very creative and was always drawing and designing things," her family said.

Olivia took art and dance lessons, played tennis, soccer and swam. She was involved in Girl Scouts and musical theater. She loved school and did well in math and reading.

Her family described her as a "grateful child ... never greedy." Each night, Olivia led grace at the dinner table.

Dylan Hockley, 6

"To know him was to love him," Dylan's grandmother told the Boston Herald about her grandson.

Dylan loved video games, jumping on a trampoline, watching movies and munching garlic bread, she said. He had dimples, blue eyes and "the most mischievous little grin," Theresa Moretti told the newspaper.

She said her daughter and son-in-law moved to Connecticut from England and chose to live where they did because of the schools. Dylan had an older brother.

"He was an angel," Moretti told the Herald. "And I think that's now why he's in heaven."

Dawn Lafferty Hochsprung, 47

Hochsprung, who became Sandy Hook Elementary School's principal two years ago, was "really nice and very fun, but she was also very much a tough lady in the right sort of sense," friend Tom Prunty said. And the students loved her. "Even little kids know when someone cares about them, and that was her," Prunty said.

"I never saw her without a smile," said Aimee Seaver, mother of a first-grader.

Hochsprung lived in Woodbury, Connecticut, with her husband, two daughters and three stepdaughters.

The longtime career educator majored in special education for her bachelor's and master's degrees in the 1990s and had just entered the Ph.D. program at Esteves School of Education at the Sage Colleges in New York last summer. Hochsprung led a school district's strategic planning panel and was the recipient of a national school grant.

Her accomplishments included overseeing the installation of a new security system requiring every visitor to ring the front entrance's doorbell after the school doors locked at 9:30 a.m.

"My mom, Dawn Hochsprung, was taken tragically from me. But she went down in a blaze of glory that truly represents who she was," her daughter, Cristina Hassinger, tweeted.

Jesse Lewis, 6

Jesse loved math, riding horses and playing at his mom's farm, his father told the New York Post.

"He was just a happy boy," said Neil Heslin. "Everybody knew Jesse."

He told the newspaper his son was to make gingerbread houses at school Friday. Heslin was planning to help.

Instead, the last time he saw his son was when he dropped him off at school at 9 a.m.

"He was going to go places in life," Heslin told the Post.

Ana Marquez-Greene, 6

"1, 2, 3, ready and go," Ana counts down in a homemade video provided to CNN affiliate WTIC.

The girl in pigtails stands in front of a piano as her brother plays. Her voice is clear, bigger than her size. Ana smiles and waves.

Her father, Jimmy Greene, is a jazz musician. His representative released a statement on Ana's death, describing the little girl as "beautiful and vibrant."

"The family has requested privacy at this time of heartbreaking loss," it read. They "have asked us to relay their sincere gratitude for the outpouring of support and sympathy locally, nationally and internationally."

Grace McDonnell, 7

The ultimate "girly girl." Grace loved wearing pink and playing dress-up with jewelry, her grandmother told the Boston Herald.

As Mary Ann McDonnell spoke, she was surrounded by Christmas presents meant for Grace, Gracie, as she was sometimes called.

The little girl loved art, gymnastics, soccer and her small spaniel, Puddin', her grandmother said.

"She was a wonderful little girl. She was always smiling," McDonnell told the newspaper. "I think everybody should know about these beautiful children whose lives were cut short."

Anne Marie Murphy, 52

A hero. That's how a first responder reportedly described Murphy to her father.

He told Newsday that authorities told him her body was found in a classroom, covering young children killed in the shooting in an apparent attempt to shield them.

"She died doing what she loved. She was serving children and serving God," Murphy's mother, Alice McGowan, told the newspaper.

A married mother of four, Murphy was artistic and hardworking, her parents said.

"She was a happy soul," her mother told Newsday. "She was a very good daughter, a good mother, a good wife."

Emilie Parker, 6

She could "light up a room," Emilie's father said about his oldest daughter.

Robbie Parker described her as "bright, creative and very loving." Emilie was always willing to try new things, he said, except food. Her laugh was infectious.

"My daughter Emilie would be one of the first ones to be standing up and giving her love and support to all of those victims, because that is the type of person she is," said Parker.

He said she was "an exceptional artist and she always carried around her markers and pencils so she never missed an opportunity to draw a picture or make a card for someone."

"This world is a better place because she has been in it," Parker said.

Emilie's aunt described her niece as the "sweetest little girl I've ever known."

The family is devastated that "someone so beautiful and perfect is no longer going to be in our lives and for no reason," said Jill Cottle Garrett.

Emilie's father, who works as a physician's assistant in the newborn unit at the Danbury hospital, recalled his last conversation with his daughter was in Portuguese, a language he was teaching her.

"She said that she loved me, and I gave her a kiss and I was out the door," he said.

Noah Pozner, 6

"He had a huge heart and he was so much fun, a little bit rambunctious, lots of spirit," Noah's aunt told CNN. "He was really the light of the room."

Victoria Haller said her nephew loved playing with his cousins and siblings, especially his twin sister.

"He was a gorgeous, gorgeous boy and he could really get what he wanted just by batting those long eyelashes and looking at you with those big blue eyes. You really couldn't say no to him," she said.

His siblings don't know yet the exact way in which Noah passed away, Haller said.

"How do you tell them that's how their brother died?" she asked. "It's the unthinkable really."

Jessica Rekos, 6

Jessica loved everything about horses -- horse movies, horse books, drawing horses and writing stories about them.

She asked Santa this year for new cowgirl boots and a cowgirl hat. Her family had promised she could get her own horse when she turned 10.

"She was a creative, beautiful, little girl," her family said in a statement, describing Jessica as their "rock."

"She had an answer for everything, she didn't miss a trick, and she outsmarted us every time. We called her our little CEO for the way she carefully thought out and planned everything," they said. "We can not imagine our life without her."

Jessica also loved orca whales and playing with her two little brothers.

"We are mourning her loss, sharing our beautiful memories we have of her, and trying to help her brother Travis understand why he can't play with his best friend," her family said.

Lauren Rousseau, 30

Rousseau, a permanent substitute teacher at Sandy Hook Elementary, "wanted to be a teacher from before she even went to kindergarten," her mother said in a written statement Saturday. "We will miss her terribly and will take comfort knowing that she had achieved that dream," Teresa Rousseau said.

She grew up in Danbury, Connecticut, and earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Connecticut and a master's degree in elementary education from the University of Bridgeport.

Rousseau "worked as a substitute teacher in Danbury, New Milford and Newtown before she was hired in November as a permanent substitute teacher at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown," her mother said.

Mary Sherlach, 56

Sherlach, Sandy Hook Elementary's school psychologist, was with Hochsprung when they heard a "pop, pop, pop" sound around 9:30 a.m., a parent with both women at the time told CNN. Sherlach was shot to death after heading into the hall to find out what was happening.

"I ... am always ready to assist in problem-solving, intervention and prevention," Sherlach wrote on her website.

Sherlach earned her undergraduate degree in psychology at SUNY Cortland and a master's degree at Southern Connecticut State University. She worked as a rehabilitation assistant at a group home for disabled adults and as a community mental health placement specialist before becoming a school psychologist.

She worked in three Connecticut school systems before moving to Sandy Hook Elementary in 1994. During her time in Newtown, Sherlach kept busy as a member of numerous groups such as the district conflict resolution committee, safe school climate committee, crisis intervention team and student instructional team.

Sherlach and her husband for more than three decades lived in Trumbull, Connecticut, and, together, they were "proud parents" of two daughters in their late 20s. Her website listed her interests as gardening, reading and going to the theater.

Victoria Soto, 27

Soto, a first-grade teacher at Sandy Hook Elementary, moved her students away from the classroom door when she heard gunfire, which students initially "thought were hammers falling," according to the father of one of her students.

"That's when the gunman burst in, did not say a word, no facial expressions, and proceeded to shoot their teacher," said Robert Licata, whose 6-year-old son, Aiden, escaped by running past the shooter.

Soto's mother said her daughter was selfless.

"She would not hesitate to think to save anyone else before herself and especially children. She loved them more than life, and she would definitely put herself in front of them any day," Donna Soto told CNN's Piers Morgan.

Soto wanted to be a teacher since she was 3 and talked about her students with "such fondness and caring," her mother said.

Soto's cousin, James Wiltsie, said Soto "instinctively went into action when a monster came into her classroom and tried to protect the kids that she loved so much."

"We just want the public to know that Vicki was a hero," he said.

Soto had a dog she loved. The black lab Roxie spent Saturday wandering around Soto's apartment, apparently looking for her, relatives said.

Other victims

Daniel Barden, 7; Josephine Gay, 7; Madeleine Hsu, 6; Catherine Hubbard, 6; Chase Kowalski, 7; James Mattioli, 6; Jack Pinto, 6; Caroline Previdi, 6; Avielle Richman, 6; Benjamin Wheeler, 6; Allison Wyatt, 6.

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Response to James48 (Reply #26)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 08:52 AM

27. .

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Response to iamthebandfanman (Original post)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 08:56 AM

28. The use of the word "Patriot"

in this context is disconcerting. Nice touch.

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Response to iamthebandfanman (Original post)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 09:07 AM

29. its called bump firing

in fact its not as easy as it looks. IT requires that you find the right amount of pressure to apply on the the trigger as well as the right amount of "looseness" when holding the gun. It takes practice

Also the rubberband/shoelace technique i believe is agasint federal law- I've seen guys hassled at a local range because he had a shoe lace next to his Rifle.

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Response to iamthebandfanman (Original post)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 09:23 AM

32. let's hope

 

the next school shooter doesn't aim, like this guy.

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Response to iamthebandfanman (Original post)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 09:48 AM

35. Does anybody else find it odd the amount of people prepared and eager to explain

the technique and it's drawbacks to us gun Luddites on DU? I don't know, I guess I would hope something so stupid and potentially destructive wouldn't be so commonplace and if it's not, I would hope that the technical information wouldn't be such a brag-able commodity.

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Response to Ed Suspicious (Reply #35)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 12:46 PM

39. I don't know if anyone

is particularly bragging, we all have diverse pieces of information to offer, some of us are former gun owners and I'm willing to bet at least 'part time' gun nuts or ex-military and these facts kinda accrue like other technical know how.
I've always thought forewarned was (no pun and probably inappropriate) forearmed, and the maximum amount of data we have to work with is best.
Or would you like to have this be one of the things sprung on you in the next headline or sometime in the forthcoming future as one of those things we 'never considered'? I sure as well wouldn't want to encounter first hand by tragedy HALF the shit I have rolling around in my brain.

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