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Thu Nov 22, 2012, 01:21 PM

Cute anchor babies.

10 replies, 2419 views

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Reply Cute anchor babies. (Original post)
geefloyd46 Nov 2012 OP
Little Star Nov 2012 #1
panAmerican Nov 2012 #2
freshwest Nov 2012 #3
Change has come Nov 2012 #4
WillyT Nov 2012 #5
Submariner Nov 2012 #6
RC Nov 2012 #8
AlbertCat Nov 2012 #7
ProudProgressiveNow Nov 2012 #9
leveymg Nov 2012 #10

Response to geefloyd46 (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 01:30 PM

1. Love it!

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Response to geefloyd46 (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 01:34 PM

2. Thinking of sending this to my MIL, lol

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Response to geefloyd46 (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 02:12 PM

3. There goes the neighborhood...

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Response to geefloyd46 (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 02:14 PM

4. K & R!

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Response to geefloyd46 (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 02:57 PM

5. K & R !!!


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Response to geefloyd46 (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 02:57 PM

6. Thanksgiving: A National Day of Mourning for Indians



http://bermudaradical.wordpress.com/2011/11/24/thanksgiving-a-national-day-of-mourning-for-indians-2/

By Moonanum James and Mahtowin Munro. Mahtowin Munro (Lakota) and Moonanum James (Wampanoag) are co-leaders of United American Indians of New England.

Every year since 1970, United American Indians of New England have organized the National Day of Mourning observance in Plymouth at noon on Thanksgiving Day. Every year, hundreds of Native people and our supporters from all four directions join us. Every year, including this year, Native people from throughout the Americas will speak the truth about our history and about current issues and struggles we are involved in.

Why do hundreds of people stand out in the cold rather than sit home eating turkey and watching football? Do we have something against a harvest festival?

Of course not. But Thanksgiving in this country — and in particular in Plymouth –is much more than a harvest home festival. It is a celebration of the pilgrim mythology.

According to this mythology, the pilgrims arrived, the Native people fed them and welcomed them, the Indians promptly faded into the background, and everyone lived happily ever after.

The truth is a sharp contrast to that mythology.
The pilgrims are glorified and mythologized because the circumstances of the first English-speaking colony in Jamestown were frankly too ugly (for example, they turned to cannibalism to survive) to hold up as an effective national myth. The pilgrims did not find an empty land any more than Columbus “discovered” anything. Every inch of this land is Indian land. The pilgrims (who did not even call themselves pilgrims) did not come here seeking religious freedom; they already had that in Holland. They came here as part of a commercial venture. They introduced sexism, racism, anti-lesbian and gay bigotry, jails, and the class system to these shores. One of the very first things they did when they arrived on Cape Cod — before they even made it to Plymouth — was to rob Wampanoag graves at Corn Hill and steal as much of the Indians’ winter provisions of corn and beans as they were able to carry. They were no better than any other group of Europeans when it came to their treatment of the Indigenous peoples here. And no, they did not even land at that sacred shrine called Plymouth Rock, a monument to racism and oppression which we are proud to say we buried in 1995.

The first official “Day of Thanksgiving” was proclaimed in 1637 by Governor Winthrop. He did so to celebrate the safe return of men from the Massachusetts Bay Colony who had gone to Mystic, Connecticut to participate in the massacre of over 700 Pequot women, children, and men.

About the only true thing in the whole mythology is that these pitiful European strangers would not have survived their first several years in “New England” were it not for the aid of Wampanoag people. What Native people got in return for this help was genocide, theft of our lands, and never-ending repression. We are treated either as quaint relics from the past, or are, to most people, virtually invisible.

snip >

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Response to Submariner (Reply #6)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 03:52 PM

8. Your post deserves an OP of its own.

 

Too bad I can rec'd it.

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Response to geefloyd46 (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 03:01 PM

7. Well....

.... no one knows what happened to Virginia Dare.

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Response to geefloyd46 (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 04:03 PM

9. K&R nt

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Response to geefloyd46 (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 04:04 PM

10. Cute toon, but "Anchor babies" are a RW myth. Having kids here gives parents no right to stay in

the US. A US citizen can't petition for parents until age 21. That's not much of an anchor and a very long time to try to stay in undocumented status.

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