HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » Video & Multimedia (Forum) » Everyday, Thousands of pe...

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 02:48 PM

Everyday, Thousands of people suffer from Sudden Cardiac Arrest. Would you know how to help?

Simulation of a cardiac arrest in a shopping mall with first responder steps: 911, Chest compressions and CPR. Interactive video:

http://www.heartrescuenow.com/

20 replies, 1630 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 20 replies Author Time Post
Reply Everyday, Thousands of people suffer from Sudden Cardiac Arrest. Would you know how to help? (Original post)
pokerfan Sep 2012 OP
proud patriot Sep 2012 #1
Live and Learn Sep 2012 #3
pokerfan Sep 2012 #13
Live and Learn Sep 2012 #14
pokerfan Sep 2012 #16
Live and Learn Sep 2012 #20
Live and Learn Sep 2012 #2
jonthebru Sep 2012 #11
Live and Learn Sep 2012 #15
jody Sep 2012 #4
virgogal Sep 2012 #6
Tigress DEM Sep 2012 #9
jody Sep 2012 #12
pokerfan Sep 2012 #18
enlightenment Sep 2012 #5
HockeyMom Sep 2012 #7
jonthebru Sep 2012 #8
darkangel218 Sep 2012 #10
rsweets Sep 2012 #17
Rhiannon12866 Sep 2012 #19

Response to pokerfan (Original post)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 02:53 PM

1. I'm trained and certified

and when my dad was suffering chest pain earlier this year I gave him an asprin and drove him to the emergency room.

the first thing the nurse asked was have you taken an asprin , he said yes my duaghter gave me one the nurse said that may have saved his life . he under went surgery to deal with the blockage.

He's doing well now and eating healthy etc.. now if we can get him to learn to say no sometimes when his expertise is needed
for a concert somewhere his life can settle and I won't worry .

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to proud patriot (Reply #1)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 02:56 PM

3. Great reminder. Think I will start carrying a small supply of aspirin with me. nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Live and Learn (Reply #3)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 03:37 PM

13. baby aspirin is good

4x81mg = 325mg chewed up seems to be the standard protocol. (Chewing breaks down the pill's coating so it can be absorbed more quickly.)

http://www.firehouse.com/forums/t106636/

Also keep in mind that aspirin has a limited (36 month) shelf life so keep that supply up to date.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to pokerfan (Reply #13)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 04:03 PM

14. I know that many take baby aspirin daily to prevent but wondered

if a baby aspirin is really enough when actually having an attack. Is it?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Live and Learn (Reply #14)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 04:39 PM

16. According to the Red Cross

The incidence of heart attacks in the United States is one per 1000 population per year. Chest pain is a major manifestation of heart attacks. There has been popular press and advertising attention rendered to the common medical practice of administering aspirin in the setting of chest pain thought to be of cardiac origin. Thus it is very important that Red Cross First Aid personnel be advised on the implementation of this therapy which has been shown to be of benefit in the early response to heart attacks. Aspirin is a safe and effective treatment for heart attacks in combination with many other methods of care.

The "lay rescuer" should immediately call 9-1-1 or activate the local EMS unit; and make the patient as comfortable as possible. If the patient is conscious and able to take oral medication and the patient denies

-Allergy to aspirin
-Stomach ulcer disease, or,
-Taking “blood thinners” (Coumadin, Warfarin, or other anti-platelet drugs)

the lay rescuer should offer two chewable (162 mg) baby aspirins or up to as much as one five grain (325 mg) adult aspirin tablet with a small amount of water. If a patient has been revived or resuscitated from a suspected cardiac event, then the "lay rescuer" should offer aspirin treatment if the patient is able to ingest oral medications and does not have any of the above listed contraindications.

NOTE: Tylenol, Acetaminophen, Motrin, Advil, Ibuprofen and other pain killers are NOT equivalent to Aspirin

http://www.instructorscorner.org/media/resources/SAC/Asp%20Admin%20Chest%20Pain%20Lay%20Resps.pdf

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to pokerfan (Reply #16)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 08:31 PM

20. Thank you. Should have looked it up myself. nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to pokerfan (Original post)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 02:55 PM

2. Unfortunately, I have never come across an AED emergency box

in any of the places I usually frequent.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Live and Learn (Reply #2)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 03:26 PM

11. Most venues have them almost all Police cars have them.

If your church or other social hall doesn't have one raise the issue.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jonthebru (Reply #11)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 04:05 PM

15. We don't even have them at work (government agency with over 1000 people in our building).

I honestly have never seen one anywhere I have been.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to pokerfan (Original post)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 03:05 PM

4. On 2 June 2007, two guardian angels kept trying until paramedics came. The medics told me later

 

I was dead but they kept trying until they got me to the emergency room.

Doctors there kept trying and finally got a stable heart beat to justify a triple bypass.

Today I enjoy life but I have a haunting question, "Most people only die once but I've got to do it again so where did I go wrong?"

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jody (Reply #4)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 03:15 PM

6. Wow! Glad you're still with us,thanks to people who knew what to do.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jody (Reply #4)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 03:25 PM

9. Only the GOOD die young. You're a DEM and we need you til you're an old fart.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Tigress DEM (Reply #9)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 03:30 PM

12. When does one become an "old fart"? Be careful I'm 77.

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jody (Reply #12)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 05:12 PM

18. To me, an old fart is anyone 25 years older than me

so you don't qualify.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to pokerfan (Original post)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 03:14 PM

5. My father was resucitated after a sudden cardiac arrest

by an AZ State Trooper who had just received training and was carrying the only portable defibrillator in the county. Dad lived a good number of years after that, thanks to good training and a quick response.

Many years ago I taught first aid and CPR for the Red Cross. I always had at least one student in the class who wondered why it was worth it to try when statistically the majority of victims did not survive in the long run (remember, many years ago). "How" they wondered, could they live with knowing that they had failed to save a life?

I asked them to imagine standing with a group of friends. Suddenly one of their friends clutches their chest and drops to the ground; they were going into cardiac arrest.

Who would they rather be at that point, I asked them? The friend who could try to help, even if it failed - or the friend who could do nothing but call 911 and wait helplessly, watching their friend die at their feet.

Most said they would rather be able to do something.

It is worth it to learn basic first aid and CPR, regardless of the outcome.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to pokerfan (Original post)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 03:21 PM

7. I was trained and certified in public schools and agencies for developmentally disabled

You also have to be re-trained and re-certified over the years. It is required by law in order to work with the special needs population: children and adults. There are different procedures for performing CPR on babies, children, and adults.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to pokerfan (Original post)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 03:23 PM

8. Yes, I would.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to pokerfan (Original post)


Response to pokerfan (Original post)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 04:53 PM

17. + 1

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to pokerfan (Original post)

Sun Sep 16, 2012, 07:06 PM

19. K&R! Yes, but need to get recertified.

Thanks for posting this and for the reminder...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread