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Wed Jan 16, 2013, 06:34 AM

Analysis: France digs in for long, uncertain stay in Mali

(Reuters) - In five days, France's mercy dash to Mali to stop al Qaeda-linked Islamists seizing the capital has bounced it into a promise to keep troops there until its West African former colony is finally back on its feet.

Exactly how long that will take is hard to say. But Africa's latest war is likely to entail a long stay for France with an exit strategy that will depend largely on allies who have yet to prove they are ready for the fight.

"We should get used to the idea we are embarking on a major mission alongside Malian and African forces for the duration," Defense Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said late on Tuesday.

The outcome could seal France's role in Africa for decades. At best, it is a chance to rescue a country destabilized by arms flooding in from the 2011 war in nearby Libya which France, under ex-president Nicolas Sarkozy, helped to promote.

http://uk.reuters.com/article/2013/01/16/us-mali-france-mission-idUSBRE90F0EL20130116

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Reply Analysis: France digs in for long, uncertain stay in Mali (Original post)
dipsydoodle Jan 2013 OP
xchrom Jan 2013 #1
malthaussen Jan 2013 #2
dipsydoodle Jan 2013 #3
TwilightGardener Jan 2013 #6
awoke_in_2003 Jan 2013 #9
malthaussen Jan 2013 #10
toby jo Jan 2013 #4
dipsydoodle Jan 2013 #5
kenny blankenship Jan 2013 #7
Ash_F Jan 2013 #8

Response to dipsydoodle (Original post)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 07:05 AM

1. du rec. nt

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Response to dipsydoodle (Original post)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 09:34 AM

2. Funny how all this just floats under the radar.

Been a bunch of threads about it since the invasion... errr, liberation... but no traction at all. I guess Lance Armstrong is more important.

-- Mal

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Response to malthaussen (Reply #2)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 10:04 AM

3. What we get here in the UK

may differ from your censored news over there.

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Response to malthaussen (Reply #2)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 10:33 AM

6. I feel the same way.

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Response to malthaussen (Reply #2)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 12:54 PM

9. The government of Mali

asked for France to come. How is that an invasion?

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Response to awoke_in_2003 (Reply #9)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 01:27 PM

10. You mean the government that overthrew the government? n/t

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Response to dipsydoodle (Original post)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 10:17 AM

4. In the US' latest attacks for oil France was among the loudest saying no to occupying the middle

east. 'We did that in Nam, it didn't work', they said.

What gives, Dipsy? What does Mali have that France wants? This one's been under my radar, too.

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Response to toby jo (Reply #4)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 10:23 AM

5. My only knowedge of their resources

are substantial amounts of gold and the fact that all farmland had been appropriated by the government and mainly turned over to sugar production for export as ethanol to the west.

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Response to toby jo (Reply #4)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 11:02 AM

7. See, Uranium is different. War for oil is bad.

But war for uranium is at least not bad if not absolutely good. Areva, the french mining company lost its exclusive contract for Niger's uranium a few years ago. You may remember Niger and its uranium deposits, which made such big headlines back when the WarChimp said Iraq was trying to get some, and his government was caught lying about that, as well as being caught illegally revealing the identity of a CIA covert agent, a Mrs. Valerie Plame? Well, next door to Niger sits Mali. Mali has uranium mines too, and they are generally in the north of the country where the Tuareg rebellion is centered. As you may know, France was the colonial master there in Mali - which it called graciously called Soudan Francais or the French Sudan, for 70 years expropriating resources freely as they wished. France granted independence to the region including Mali and neighboring states under its control in 1960. It began to build a vast civilian atomic energy program, however, in the two decades following the loss of its West African colonies. The special relationship of France to W. Africa enabled them to obtain the fuel for this project on very advantageous terms. How so? Well, consider that the interim government of Mali, which has "invited" French military assistance, was in part appointed by French diplomats.
Today, 75% of France's electrical generation comes from atomic power and it is an electricity exporter to other European states because of it. But that all runs on uranium, and as I mentioned before, France's privileged access to Niger's uranium is at an end, thus increasing the price for its energy supply. And there is Mali with its uranium and no government.

So you can see how making a war for uranium is COMPLETELY DIFFERENT than the moral quagmire of a war for petroleum.

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Response to toby jo (Reply #4)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 11:09 AM

8. Xenophobia has been on the rise in France in the past 10 years.

That makes it easier for the politicians and their handlers.

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