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Tue Dec 25, 2012, 11:27 PM

When Books Could Change Your Life

http://www2.citypaper.com/special/story.asp?id=16743

"Why What We Pore Over At 12 May Be The Most Important Reading We Ever Do"

13 replies, 1600 views

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Arrow 13 replies Author Time Post
Reply When Books Could Change Your Life (Original post)
farminator3000 Dec 2012 OP
Squinch Dec 2012 #1
exboyfil Dec 2012 #2
farminator3000 Dec 2012 #4
farminator3000 Dec 2012 #3
Squinch Dec 2012 #5
JDPriestly Dec 2012 #6
Bluenorthwest Dec 2012 #8
Squinch Dec 2012 #11
knitter4democracy Dec 2012 #7
Nay Dec 2012 #9
farminator3000 Dec 2012 #10
Squinch Dec 2012 #12
cbrer Dec 2012 #13

Response to farminator3000 (Original post)

Tue Dec 25, 2012, 11:44 PM

1. Great article.

I fear that 12 year olds are too busy today playing video games and don't read the books that will change their lives.

So sad for them.

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Response to Squinch (Reply #1)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 12:26 AM

2. I do not have video games in the house

Both my daughters read like crazy.

I guess I have different opinion on this piece. The books I liked as a 12 year old (Burroughs, London, Tom Swift) have not aged well with me. Even books I picked up in Middle/High School (Asimov, Bradbury, Vonnegut, Farmer, Moorcock, Lieber, Niven, Pournelle, Tolkien, Stephen Donaldson) do not appeal to me nearly as much now. Finally the college selection (King, Ellison, Heinlein, Clive Barker) are also not ones I will likely return to soon.

My interests lie with mostly non-fiction history and science now.

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Response to exboyfil (Reply #2)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 12:38 AM

4. i still like Vonnegut

try the Chronicles of Prydain by LLoyd Alexander, i like it more than LOTR or Narnia

for yourself and daughters. i just learned a new word!

Bildungsroman
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In literary criticism, a Bildungsroman (German pronunciation: ; German: "formation novel") or coming-of-age story is a literary genre that focuses on the psychological and moral growth of the protagonist from youth to adulthood (coming of age), and in which character change is thus extremely important.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chronicles_of_Prydain

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Response to Squinch (Reply #1)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 12:33 AM

3. hey

that could be the whole problem, right there. the problem with EVERYTHING!

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Response to farminator3000 (Reply #3)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 12:43 AM

5. I think so!

It uses the brain in a completely different way. Books wake up the brain, and the video games shut it down. And kids spend HOURS with their brains shut down every day.

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Response to Squinch (Reply #5)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 04:06 AM

6. Yes.

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Response to Squinch (Reply #1)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 08:19 AM

8. Fear. I fear. Jaysus. When I was a kid alongside the dinosaurs, many other kids did not read for

reasons other than assignment, if that. They did not have video games, but they had plenty of games, sports, distractions, hobbies, pursuits and diversions outside of reading. Same as now. Some kids read, some don't. Twas ever thus.

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Response to Bluenorthwest (Reply #8)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 11:00 AM

11. Yes, kids played sports, and games and hobbies. Now it's just video games. I work with city kids.

You ask them after a weekend, "What did you do this weekend." "Played video games" "Did you go to the park?" "No." "Did you go outside?" "No." "Did you read a book?" "No." "Did you draw a picture?" "No." "Did you do anything at home other than the video games?" "No."

And that's the vast majority of Monday conversations about the weekends. The kids are out of shape, they are inexperienced in things that require physical coordination, they often have a really hard time solving problems. They have a difficult time forming games among themselves at recess without someone telling them what to do. All this has long term effects.

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Response to farminator3000 (Original post)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 08:13 AM

7. My daughter's 12 and a voracious reader.

She'd probably say The Hunger Games, the only book I've ever had to break up a school fight over. Best day of my teaching career, breaking up two non-readers who were almost to blows over the second book in the series and who was going to get to read our only copy.

I'd say it starts in middle school and goes through college depending on the student. Some come to it late because they hate reading so much.

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Response to farminator3000 (Original post)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 09:12 AM

9. Black Beauty, Uncle Tom's Cabin, and A Wrinkle in Time (M. L'Engle) were the books that

changed my life....I read A Wrinkle in Time to my son when he was about 8, and he still remembers the story (he's 30 now).

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Response to Nay (Reply #9)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 10:02 AM

10. love that one

i've been meaning to read that again, great book (wrinkle)

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Response to Nay (Reply #9)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 11:03 AM

12. A Wrinkle in Time!!!!! Yay!!!!!

Great book!

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Response to farminator3000 (Original post)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 05:23 PM

13. "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress" by Robert Heinlein

 

Opened my eyes to the complexities and structures of revolution.

Wrapped in a fascinating story. Definitely altered my life.

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