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Mon Sep 17, 2012, 01:23 PM

Are We Asking Too Much From Our Teachers?

The mention of Diane Ravitch in this op ed makes it entirely worthwhile reading. And then there's this, which says it all:

##snip##

"As we slash services in deeply impoverished communities and reduce school budgets, how can we expect that good teachers alone can improve the lives of poor children? Poverty, of course, can't be an excuse for lousy teaching But neither can excellent teaching alone be a solution to poverty."

##snip##

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/16/opinion/sunday/can-great-teaching-overcome-the-effects-of-poverty.html?partner=rss&emc=rss&_r=0moc.semityn.www

6 replies, 1317 views

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Arrow 6 replies Author Time Post
Reply Are We Asking Too Much From Our Teachers? (Original post)
Iwillnevergiveup Sep 2012 OP
Vincardog Sep 2012 #1
cbrer Sep 2012 #6
midnight Sep 2012 #2
sinkingfeeling Sep 2012 #3
rhett o rick Sep 2012 #4
Iwillnevergiveup Sep 2012 #5

Response to Iwillnevergiveup (Original post)

Mon Sep 17, 2012, 01:37 PM

1. This whole "Blame the teachers" meme is just cover for privatizing our schools. It is BS.

The whole standard testing was just a scheme to divert money to the PRIVATE TESTING COMPANIES.
The test results are used as a cudgel to beat teachers at underfunded schools with.
Blame the teachers UNIONs for the poor performance of impoverished students.

The end game is not to improve the education of the students by providing them with resources and personnel necessary;
it is to create vouchers that can be used to subsidize private schools.


The private (charter) schools could:
1 pick and chose their students,
2 hire non union under qualified teachers and "aids"
3 kick out under preforming students.

The public schools would be required to:
1 accept every student
2 have qualified employees
3 meet all test "objectives".

The aim is to let the Private schools skim the cream of the public school students off the top and profit off them while
leaving the rest to institutional educational ghettos.

It is a nasty neo-liberal plan and must be stopped.


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Response to Vincardog (Reply #1)

Mon Sep 17, 2012, 04:57 PM

6. Your Post

 

Blasts open the true motives of those behind those perverted schemes.

A progressive view towards education immediately illustrates the fundamental needs of students, as well as teachers, to produce citizens prepared for life in a forward thinking nation.

We spend the most, and get sub optimum results. Sound like health care to you?

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Response to Iwillnevergiveup (Original post)

Mon Sep 17, 2012, 01:52 PM

2. Can you imagine that these public school teacher want for public education what the rich and elite

have for their kids.... Smaller class sizes, music experiences, libraries, lateral curriculum that enhances the student and not the test... K&R for these teachers for giving a voice to these important fundamentals for those families and children who don't have a parent with lots of money and power...

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Response to Iwillnevergiveup (Original post)

Mon Sep 17, 2012, 02:08 PM

3. Yes. It appears that some want super-teachers to raise their kids, be solely responsible for

their education, feed them, supply them with basic school items, and teach them morals and ethnics along the way.

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Response to Iwillnevergiveup (Original post)

Mon Sep 17, 2012, 02:17 PM

4. I blame the administrators.

The school I am familiar with comes up with a totally new concept of teaching math about every 3 to 4 years. Seems to me like someone gets a PHD developing a "new math" and some ambitious administrator decides it's time to change. Of course this puts a terrible burden on teachers and parents that are trying to be consistent with the children. How many times have you heard, "my mom says she doesnt understand this "new math"? In fact just about the time the teachers catch on to the "new math", bingo, it's time to change. Who is in charge of curriculum?

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Response to Iwillnevergiveup (Original post)

Mon Sep 17, 2012, 02:22 PM

5. While sitting in a faculty meeting

at a South Central L.A. elementary school in March 2007, I so vividly remember the discussion. Of course, it was how to raise the test scores at our underperforming campus, and teachers were clearly unhappy. There were lots of fidgeting and sidebar conversations going on. One brave teacher raised her hand and said, "It's very clear there are forces in this country that want to do away with public education entirely and voucher it. Any ideas what we can do about it?" Then there was a hush.

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