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Mon Feb 25, 2013, 08:14 PM

 

Net providers begin warning of illegal downloads

Source: AP

Internet users who illegally share music, movies or television shows online could soon receive warning notices from the nation's five major Internet service providers.

The Copyright Alert System, organized by the recording and film industry, is being activated this week to target consumers using peer-to-peer software.

Under the new system, complaints will prompt an Internet service provider — such as Verizon or AT&T — to notify a customer whose Internet address has been detected sharing files illegally. A person will be given up to six opportunities to stop before the Internet provider will take more drastic steps, such as temporarily slowing their connection, or redirecting Internet traffic until they acknowledge they received a notice or review educational materials about copyright law.

Consumers who maintain they have been wrongly accused would be forced to pay $35 to appeal the decision. The fee would be reimbursed if they prevail.

Read more: http://news.yahoo.com/net-providers-begin-warning-illegal-downloads-231923384--finance.html

32 replies, 6308 views

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Arrow 32 replies Author Time Post
Reply Net providers begin warning of illegal downloads (Original post)
Mason Kennedy Feb 2013 OP
freshwest Feb 2013 #1
jsr Feb 2013 #2
Mason Kennedy Feb 2013 #4
dixiegrrrrl Feb 2013 #9
Jerry442 Feb 2013 #15
JesterCS Feb 2013 #3
renate Feb 2013 #6
Grassy Knoll Feb 2013 #5
dixiegrrrrl Feb 2013 #7
high density Feb 2013 #8
NYC Liberal Feb 2013 #10
LittleGirl Feb 2013 #11
Spitfire of ATJ Feb 2013 #13
Spitfire of ATJ Feb 2013 #12
ramapo Feb 2013 #14
jsr Feb 2013 #16
dixiegrrrrl Feb 2013 #19
DisgustipatedinCA Feb 2013 #23
PatrynXX Feb 2013 #17
NeeDeep Feb 2013 #21
another_liberal Feb 2013 #18
toby jo Feb 2013 #20
bitchkitty Feb 2013 #25
riqster Feb 2013 #26
dotymed Feb 2013 #22
Jim Braun Feb 2013 #24
graham4anything Feb 2013 #27
Dr. Strange Feb 2013 #28
grok Feb 2013 #29
and-justice-for-all Feb 2013 #30
nomorenomore08 Mar 2013 #31
ZombieHorde Mar 2013 #32

Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 08:19 PM

1. Interesting. Thanks.

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 08:23 PM

2. $35 for each time you're accused?

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Response to jsr (Reply #2)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 08:27 PM

4. $35 if you appeal the accusation, only

 

If you are found to be wrongly accused, you get your money back. Or something like that.

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Reply #4)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 09:01 PM

9. How providers will treat offenders is still unkown.


Today the controversial “six-strikes” anti-piracy system kicks off in the United States. Soon the first BitTorrent users will receive so-called copyright alerts from their Internet provider and after multiple warnings subscribers will be punished. But, what these punishments entail remains a bit of a mystery. None of the participating ISPs have officially announced how they will treat repeat infringers and the CCI doesn’t have this information either.
http://torrentfreak.com/six-strikes-anti-piracy-scheme-starts-130225/

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Reply #4)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 09:51 PM

15. So, if I finger you as a bad person....

...you can protest, but only if you pay me a $35 fee. Then, if after I think it over and decide you're not such a bad person after all, you get your $35 back.

I don't see any problem there. You?

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Response to JesterCS (Reply #3)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 08:40 PM

6. as a person in her 40s, I have no idea what that is :)

I remember helping my kids figure out how to use their computers, a million years ago... now I practically need their help just to turn it on.

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 08:35 PM

5. I remember when they took down limewire....

then hundreds of new knockoffs took it's place.
Plus there is a lot of ways to hide what your doing
online with things like "cyberghost".

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 08:59 PM

7. Hope more people rec this so folks will be aware.

In related news..


The Pirate Bay Departs Sweden And Sets Sail For Norway and Spain

Following threats of legal action in its traditional home of Sweden, a few hours ago The Pirate Bay set sail for pastures new. Sweden’s Pirate Party had been providing bandwidth to the site for the last three years but came under intense pressure last week when a local anti-piracy group threatened to sue. The Swedish pirates have now stepped aside and handed the responsibilities to pirate parties in Norway and Spain.

http://torrentfreak.com/

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 09:00 PM

8. I'm lucky to have a local ISP

which is not owned by the RIAA.

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 09:01 PM

10. Internet should be treated as a public utility and ISPs as common carriers.

Imagine if a bunch of unelected, unaccountable corporations got together and monitored your electricity or your water supply and "throttled" them if they didn't like what you were doing with either -- with no recourse except to pay $35 to have your case "reviewed" by the same people who accused you in the first place.

It would be outrageous.

ISPs' job is to provide you with an Internet connection, not to be private armies for mega-corporations.

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 09:01 PM

11. for those of us that cut the 'cable' subscription cord

this could be trouble for us. We got tired of paying 100 bucks a month for tv so bought an antenna and computer. I used on-line URL's for watching MSNBC for Rachel and the Daily Show's web site for Jon Stewart. But if it's not 'free to air', I'd really be limited on access to the world news. damn it.

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Response to LittleGirl (Reply #11)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 09:19 PM

13. Uh oh....

The entertainment media is supposed to hypnotize the public so they can't see how badly they're getting hosed.

Now the distraction is becoming part of the hosing.

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 09:07 PM

12. I got a warning from an ISP for using a torrent file to get Linux....

They dropped the whole thing when they realized the situation but that demonstrates how overzealous their monitoring can be.

They act like there ARE no public ports.

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 09:21 PM

14. Not exactly new

ISPs have been going after BitTorrent users for awhile. They've made life miserable for an unlucky relative few and also aim to at least embarrass those caught downloading the latest porn releases.

Between your ISP and Google, there is very little that goes unnoticed about what you do with your computer.

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 10:06 PM

16. There seem to be many ways around Six Strikes:

http://blogs.computerworld.com/internet/21817/six-ways-pirates-can-get-around-coming-six-strikes

While not advocating piracy and I’m certainly not an expert on pirating, there seem to be many ways around Six Strikes—other than don’t pirate.

1. Since Six Strikes targets BitTorrent users, they should use a VPN or anonymizing proxy service—only 16% of file-sharers hide their IP now. Apparently even some FBI pirates don’t bother with hiding IPs, even though the FBI warns that pirating is a serious, not victimless, crime.

2. Switch over to Usenet or a similiar site.

3. Download from a free file-hosting service such as one listed in Google results that the RIAA is so vehemently opposed to.

...

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Response to jsr (Reply #16)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 11:18 PM

19. Usenet, I have heard, is trimmed down a good bit

out of fear of copyright issues.
Meaning content seems to be reduced.

VPN seems like a logical way to go.
But I suspect many more options will be created in a short time, in response to the clumsy and questionable attempts to enforce copyright claims.

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #19)

Tue Feb 26, 2013, 11:31 AM

23. Usenet is just fine, if you know what to search for

There are DMCA takedowns in Usenet now, but they're not terribly effective as long as you're willing to learn a little of the esoterica surrounding nntp/newsgroups.

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 10:14 PM

17. Right now I'd say ISP's are like at least 10 years behind

so who uses P2P anymore. There's also VPN Tunnel.. about $6 a month no telling where one is..

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Response to PatrynXX (Reply #17)

Tue Feb 26, 2013, 09:50 AM

21. VPN + picking the right country for the server

 

"Switzerland prohibits the collection of ip addresses for purposes of copyright enforcement. It also is known that in Eastern Europe, particularly Moldolva, the Ukraine, Russia, Estonia and Latvia, copyright enforcement is very weak or non-existent"

VPN is good for much more than P2P, did you know your ISP gathers your particular surfing info and sells it, and probably much more. How about the major search engines doing the same, how do you think Google got so wealthy, by analyzing YOU!

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 10:57 PM

18. "If they prevail?"

The fee would be reimbursed, "If they prevail?"

Fat chance of that!

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Tue Feb 26, 2013, 09:16 AM

20. I don't cheat. & I don't care for the 'see how clever I am I'm not Really cheating'

 

mentality.

I own a business. I get robbed. I hope they get it stopped.

It's bugged me for a long time listening to people with their 'oh god it's so easy just look', or 'why do you pay for it?', or
'well, it's really not that hard to do'.

Go fuck yourselves.

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Response to toby jo (Reply #20)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 09:52 AM

25. Well, pat yourself on the back!

You're a perfect human being in every way, I'm sure.

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Response to toby jo (Reply #20)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 10:07 AM

26. Damn straight.

Thieves are thieves.

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Tue Feb 26, 2013, 10:09 AM

22. My IP (comcast) did this to me two years ago.

My Son shared a few files and I got a warning e-mail stating that I would be dropped as a customer.

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Tue Feb 26, 2013, 12:14 PM

24. Get Smart

If you're surfing through your ISP you deserve to get busted for doing nothing more than sharing publicly available material. Don't get me wrong - anybody stealing proprietary material and using it for profit should be busted that is stealing. But only in America do we allow the rich to get richer with laws that make it illegal to share what is obviously publicly available material. There are no such laws in other countries, that is the reason you can buy a BluRay recorder in Japan and record any TV program you choose and mail it to your best friend without fear of going to jail. This once great country has been so brain washed and so screwed by the rich we take the loss of inalienable rights for granted. OK that's my political rant, here what I mean when I say you deserve to get busted if you are surfing thru your ISP. You ISP logs everything you do - every site you go to and every file you transfer is logged to your account. But you can easily bypass them by using a tunneling proxy service. Those services establish an encrypted tunnel that hides all of your activities while you are on line. I'll warn that not all proxy services do this, and I'll warn that not all of your activities (peer to peer file sharing Torrents) can be forced through the proxy service. Peer to peer type connections will automatically set up a separate connection outside of the proxy tunnel which your ISP will log. Also, many proxy services actually allow your ISP to log all of your requests before you ever get into their encrypted proxy tunnel. So you need to make yourself knowledgeable before you sign up. However, once setup you can surf as fast or faster through a proxy tunnel and in complete privacy. Except for the proxy provider himself, he will then have similar logs. But his logs will be minimal, in as much as he will not record the actual files you transfer, only the time and site location data, and many will destroy the data regularly. In fact he (the proxy provider) will have almost no ability to follow any of his clients surfing habits. He simple doesn't have the resources. In fact the only time he would ever even be aware you might be doing anything considered illegal would be when and if some law enforcement agency would hit him with a court ordered subpena to turnover his logs - and he would, as he should. But just stop and think how unlikely that would be. Unless you are doing something really bad, so bad the FBI or Secrete Service has tracked you down, nobody else will have a clue what you would are doing on line.

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 10:27 AM

27. If one isn't doing something wrong or illegal, one does not have to worry

 

One can watch youtube without downloading it

and watch MSNBC to see MSNBC shows.

Before one bought a television, one couldn't watch tv
So tv was never free.

They know the difference between what is legal and not legal.

Those doing nothing wrong have nothing to worry or get agitated by.

Shoplifiting an old vinyl lp in a store was illegal and rightfully so. Theft is never a good thing.

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Response to graham4anything (Reply #27)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 01:25 PM

28. Yeah, but they don't always know the difference between what is legal and not legal.

They know the difference between what is legal and not legal.

Those doing nothing wrong have nothing to worry or get agitated by.


Read up on Righthaven and DU; Righthaven did NOT know the difference. And the fact that DU was going nothing wrong certainly didn't protect them.

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 10:52 AM

29. other options..

 

did this in another thread...

http://blogs.computerworld.com/internet/21817/six-ways-pirates-can-get-around-coming-six-strikes


This is something written by a somebody I know. pretty comprehensive.

http://www.reddit.com/r/evolutionReddit/comments/193m6k/six_strikes_goes_live_on_monday_how_to_beat_the/

Personally, I use RetroShare. Don't download much myself, use it more for it's social aspect and encrypted privacy. But it's a breeze to download safely with it in the US if that is what you want to do. Im too lazy to do anything like configure Tor, proxies and do pure I2P. This is enough for me.

It's been in development for 6 years. Only now getting stable and widely noticed.

http://www.reddit.com/r/retroshare/comments/18vsq5/retroshare_feature_list/

To download for most platforms...

http://retroshare.sourceforge.net/

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Thu Feb 28, 2013, 10:18 PM

30. I have a game I play online, which updates

by downloading quit a bit of data from time to time, how exactly are they going to know that I am not downloading a movie? also, I really do not see any difference between downloading a P2P or burning a CD for a friend, it is the same thing. Hell, I may just burn 4 CDs for 4 friends.

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 04:07 AM

31. P2P isn't really fundamentally different from music-sharing via cassette tapes or CD-R's.

Unless you're actually profiting from other people's downloads, how is this piracy?

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Response to Mason Kennedy (Original post)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 04:46 AM

32. Funny. nt

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