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Sun Feb 3, 2013, 03:10 AM

U.S. military expands its drug war in Latin America

Source: Associated Press

February 3, 2013 at 1:00 am

U.S. military expands its drug war in Latin America
By Martha Mendoza
AP National Writer

When the Navy guided-missile frigate later dropped anchor in Panamanian waters on that sunny August morning, Ensign Clarissa Carpio, a 23-year-old from San Francisco, climbed into the inflatable dinghy with four unarmed sailors and two Coast Guard officers like herself, carrying light submachine guns. It was her first deployment, but Carpio was ready for combat.

Fighting drug traffickers was precisely what she'd trained for.

In the most expensive initiative in Latin America since the Cold War, the U.S. has militarized the battle against the traffickers, spending more than $20 billion in the past decade. U.S. Army troops, Air Force pilots and Navy ships outfitted with Coast Guard counter-narcotics teams are routinely deployed to chase, track and capture drug smugglers.

The sophistication and violence of the traffickers is so great that the U.S. military is training not only law enforcement agents in Latin American nations, but their militaries as well, building a network of expensive hardware, radar, airplanes, ships, runways and refueling stations to stem the tide of illegal drugs from South America to the U.S.

According to State and Pentagon officials, stopping drug-trafficking organizations has become a matter of national security because they spread corruption, undermine fledgling democracies and can potentially finance terrorists.

More:
When the Navy guided-missile frigate later dropped anchor in Panamanian waters on that sunny August morning, Ensign Clarissa Carpio, a 23-year-old from San Francisco, climbed into the inflatable dinghy with four unarmed sailors and two Coast Guard officers like herself, carrying light submachine guns. It was her first deployment, but Carpio was ready for combat.

Fighting drug traffickers was precisely what she'd trained for.

In the most expensive initiative in Latin America since the Cold War, the U.S. has militarized the battle against the traffickers, spending more than $20 billion in the past decade. U.S. Army troops, Air Force pilots and Navy ships outfitted with Coast Guard counter-narcotics teams are routinely deployed to chase, track and capture drug smugglers.

The sophistication and violence of the traffickers is so great that the U.S. military is training not only law enforcement agents in Latin American nations, but their militaries as well, building a network of expensive hardware, radar, airplanes, ships, runways and refueling stations to stem the tide of illegal drugs from South America to the U.S.

According to State and Pentagon officials, stopping drug-trafficking organizations has become a matter of national security because they spread corruption, undermine fledgling democracies and can potentially finance terrorists.

Read more: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20130203/NATION/302030306#ixzz2JozhMH2x

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Reply U.S. military expands its drug war in Latin America (Original post)
Judi Lynn Feb 2013 OP
msongs Feb 2013 #1
Socal31 Feb 2013 #2
woo me with science Feb 2013 #8
reteachinwi Feb 2013 #3
triplepoint Feb 2013 #4
Socal31 Feb 2013 #5
triplepoint Feb 2013 #6
lib2DaBone Feb 2013 #7
DreamSmoker Feb 2013 #9
grahamhgreen Feb 2013 #10
RainDog Feb 2013 #11
RainDog Feb 2013 #12
DeSwiss Feb 2013 #13

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 03:11 AM

1. all these evils are because the stuff is illegal - prohibition does not work nt

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 03:28 AM

2. This seems like fuzzy math to me.

We are reducing our forces, "pivoting" our navy (which is not able to retain the number of carriers that congress has made into law) to the Pacific, expanding into Africa, getting more involved with Mexico, and expanding a failed drug war.


10-3=14?

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Response to Socal31 (Reply #2)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 02:26 PM

8. We're broke! We have to cut Social Security!


We are bought and sold, is what we are...

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 05:38 AM

3. Good for business

 

If only flows related to drug trafficking and other transnational organized crime activities were considered, related proceeds would have been equivalent to around US$650 billion per year in the first decade of the new millennium, equivalent to 1.5% of global GDP or US$870 billion in 2009 assuming that the proportions remained unchanged. The funds available for laundering through the financial system would have been equivalent to some 1% of global GDP or US$580 billion in 2009.
http://dissidentvoice.org/2013/01/wrist-slap-for-too-big-to-fail-or-jail-jpmorgan-chase/

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 06:16 AM

4. Let the CIA Arrest Themselves...

 

Interesting how this is way outside the mission statement of our armed forces, yet it is what they're now doing. Until the cocaine source countries truly stand up to the cocaine cartels operating within their borders, nothing will change. Hell, the CIA depends on cocaine as an income stream to fund much of their "Black Budget Programs," though they always deny this. Remember the Iran-Contra Caper? Contra-bound weaponry was flown in and cocaine was flown out...courtesy of the CIA's "Air America." So, what else ISN'T new?





Related Interesting Read:
http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/exopolitica/esp_exopolitics_I_1b.htm#The%20Black%20Budget%20Report

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Response to triplepoint (Reply #4)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 06:20 AM

5. The CIA doesn't need to move coke right now.

Afghanistan is going to have another blockbuster opium crop again this year, which will flood the streets of Europe and the US with high-quality heroin.

Guess who protects those fields?

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Response to Socal31 (Reply #5)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 06:41 AM

6. Have You Seen These Prices?

 

http://www.havocscope.com/black-market-prices/cocaine-prices
.
.
http://www.havocscope.com/black-market-prices/heroin-prices


The per gram prices of heroin and cocaine in the U.S.:

Cocaine:
$174.20

Heroin:
$200.00

Not sure what the "dose" is for each narcotic. The proximity (to the U.S.) of the coca plantations and processing centers is one big factor that makes it such a cash crop for the CIA and their cartel buddies. I never understood why the poppy that heroin comes from grew predominantly in Asia....within the "Golden Triangle." It might be the climate(?). Oh well...we're making rapid changes to that...maybe deliberate/intentional....



Reference Links:
http://www.havocscope.com/black-market-prices/heroin-prices
http://www.havocscope.com/black-market-prices/cocaine-prices

After the Vietnam War ended, the CIA went from the Heroin to Cocaine Business. The phony drug war that U.S. Troops participate in is perfect cover for the latter.
.
.



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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 01:58 PM

7. But not a penny for jobs, roads or schools at home..... just more austerity

 

"The U.S. authorized the sale of a record $2.8 billion worth of guns, satellites, radar equipment and tear gas to Western Hemisphere nations in 2011, four times the authorized sales 10 years ago, according to the latest State Department reports.

Over the same decade, defense contracts jumped from $119 million to $629 million, supporting everything from Kevlar helmets for the Mexican army to building airport runways in Aruba, according to federal contract data."

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 02:39 PM

9. From Latin America to California

Its about absolute control...
No matter how much it costs or who gets hurt...
From Armed helicopters Raiding villages in other Countries to Californians..
Our Representatives just keep making more and more so called regulations to allow this Government a Free Hand to do what it does...While Americans suffer and even go to prisons...
This has been building since Nixon was President...
Today this is a post to show how this Government has doubled down on this so called Drug War... No matter how loud Americans scream to end this loosing battle..

All based in Fear tactics and lies.... Facts be damned.. They just get in the Governments way...

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 01:09 AM

10. But..... what about the deficit?

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 01:39 AM

11. Is the federal govt full of fucking idiots? This is prohibition as a multi-national issue

How many times do people in the bureaucracies that do this have to fail before they realize their policies are wrongheaded and create more problems than they solve?

Congressman Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., who chaired the Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere for the past four years, says the U.S.-supported crackdown on Mexican cartels only left them "stronger and more violent." He intends to reintroduce a proposal for a Western Hemisphere Drug Policy Commission to evaluate antinarcotics efforts.

"Billions upon billions of U.S. taxpayer dollars have been spent over the years to combat the drug trade in Latin America and the Caribbean," he said. "In spite of our efforts, the positive results are few and far between."


The U.S. destabilizes these nations by REFUSING to deal with the appeals by THOUSANDS of reputable organizations worldwide that have called for an end to this failed war.

http://www.globalcommissionondrugs.org/Commission

Global War on Drugs Has Failed, say Commissioners

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-13624303

The 19-member commission includes Mexico's former President Ernesto Zedillo, Brazil's ex-President Fernando Henrique Cardoso and former Colombian President Cesar Gaviria, as well as the former US Federal Reserve chairman Paul Volcker and the current Prime Minister of Greece George Papandreou. The panel also features prominent Latin American writers Carlos Fuentes and Mario Vargas Llosa, the EU's former foreign policy chief Javier Solana, and George Schultz, a former US secretary of state.

It is a damning indictment. The group of world leaders, including former Presidents of Mexico and Colombia which are blighted by the trade in illegal drugs, says urgent changes are overdue.

Their report says current policies to tackle drug abuse and the crime that preys on it are clearly not working, but result in thousands of deaths and rampant lawlessness.

It calls for an end to the 'criminalisation, marginalisation and stigmatisation of people who use drugs but who do no harm to others'.

The leading international figures behind the report do not pull their punches. They say sensible regulation of drugs is working in some countries but they accuse many governments around the world of pretending that the current war on drugs is effective when they know it isn't.




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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 01:41 AM

12. Senate Subcommittee Report June 2011: Drug War Has Failed

(unless you're a private contractor)

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/06/10/senate-report-war-on-drugs-failed/

A U.S. Senate subcommittee report this week called into question efforts to curb drug exports from Latin America, suggesting that billions in tax dollars had been wasted in no-bid contracts with no oversight on how the money was being spent or whether efforts were succeeding.

"It's becoming increasingly clear that our efforts to rein in the narcotics trade in Latin America, especially as it relates to the government's use of contractors, have largely failed," Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-MO), chair of the Senate Subcommittee on Contracting Oversight, said in a media advisory. "Without adequate oversight and management we are wasting tax dollars and throwing money at a problem without even knowing what we're getting in return."

The McCaskill report indicates that U.S. taxpayers have shelled out over $3 billion for work and equipment related to the drug war in Latin America from 2005-2009, and most of that money went to private contractors.

McCaskill launched the inquiry after looking into counternarcotics efforts underway in Afghanistan. However, neither the Department of Defense nor the State Dept. were able to provide adequate documentation on their contracts and in many cases could not even identify firms that were given millions in tax dollars.


Five major defense contractors received the bulk of drug war contract spending: Raytheon, Lockheed Martin, DynCorp, ARINC and ITT. Out of all the firms, DynCorp benefitted most, winning $1.1 billion.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 02:01 AM

13. Circular logic:

''According to State and Pentagon officials, stopping drug-trafficking organizations has become a matter of national security because they spread corruption, undermine fledgling democracies and can potentially finance terrorists.''


- So we make drugs illegal thereby raising its value to the point where it is now capable of corrupting politicians and bankers with enormous sums of money that wouldn't exist if it were not illegal. Not to mention financing ''terrorists'' that we also created.

K&R




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