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Fri Jan 18, 2013, 09:17 PM

USS Guardian Aground: Crew Leaves Navy Ship Stuck In Philippines

Source: Huffington Post

Most of the sailors on a U.S. Navy minesweeper that struck a coral reef in the Philippines left the ship Friday for safety reasons after initial efforts to free the vessel failed, the Navy said.

The ship ran aground Thursday while in transit through the Tubbataha National Marine Park, a coral sanctuary in the Sulu Sea, 640 kilometers (400 miles) southwest of Manila. There were no injuries or oil leaks, and Philippine authorities were trying to evaluate damage to the protected coral reef, designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

The U.S. Navy's 7th Fleet said 72 of the 79 crew of the USS Guardian were transferred to a military support vessel by small boat. A small team of personnel will remain aboard and attempt to free the ship with minimal environmental impact, the statement said. The remaining seven sailors, including the commanding and the executive officer, will also be transferred if conditions become unsafe.

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/18/uss-guardian-aground-navy-ship-philippines_n_2502164.html



I hope the captain likes Antarctica

22 replies, 3678 views

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Arrow 22 replies Author Time Post
Reply USS Guardian Aground: Crew Leaves Navy Ship Stuck In Philippines (Original post)
SpartanDem Jan 2013 OP
DemoTex Jan 2013 #1
Confusious Jan 2013 #2
MrScorpio Jan 2013 #3
MindPilot Jan 2013 #13
Socal31 Jan 2013 #4
PoliticAverse Jan 2013 #5
Posteritatis Jan 2013 #6
slackmaster Jan 2013 #14
whistler162 Jan 2013 #19
slackmaster Jan 2013 #20
awoke_in_2003 Jan 2013 #22
nadinbrzezinski Jan 2013 #7
MADem Jan 2013 #8
James48 Jan 2013 #9
underpants Jan 2013 #10
perfessor Jan 2013 #11
cbayer Jan 2013 #15
RobertEarl Jan 2013 #12
sofa king Jan 2013 #16
neverforget Jan 2013 #17
Ezlivin Jan 2013 #21
ThoughtCriminal Jan 2013 #18

Response to SpartanDem (Original post)

Fri Jan 18, 2013, 09:25 PM

1. Guess that skipper is out of a job.

On the rocks is a bad, bad place to put a minesweeper.

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Response to DemoTex (Reply #1)

Fri Jan 18, 2013, 09:29 PM

2. Yep, that was my first thought also.

You don't make a mistake like that.

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Response to Confusious (Reply #2)

Fri Jan 18, 2013, 09:58 PM

3. Same here nt

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Response to Confusious (Reply #2)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 10:48 AM

13. At least not more than once. n/t

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Response to DemoTex (Reply #1)

Fri Jan 18, 2013, 10:12 PM

4. This is slightly off topic, but sometimes it seems they don't take the obvious course of action.

Maybe it is better now then what it used to be, but I was just reading about a Navy pilot who shot a live missile at an Air Force pilot during training in the 70s or 80s, was stripped of flying privileges for life, was just put up for promotion. (And no, it is not Obama's fault he was put up for promotion, as if the President gets to review all the mundane things that come out of his administration).

Although if memory serves me correctly, they have been clamping down on Navy officers. There was a sub that surfaced striking a Japanese fishing vessel, and I believe some heads rolled, as they should have.

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Response to Socal31 (Reply #4)

Fri Jan 18, 2013, 11:00 PM

5. Some people on the Japanese vessel died...

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Response to Socal31 (Reply #4)

Fri Jan 18, 2013, 11:45 PM

6. Pretty much any collision is basically a complete halt to a naval officer's progression, no?

I got the impression that the USN took it almost to "if your ship is in drydock and someone rams it, you're still in trouble" levels of seriousness.

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Response to DemoTex (Reply #1)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 11:06 AM

14. Not necessarily out of a job, but he's a Lieutenant Commander for Life

 

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Response to slackmaster (Reply #14)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 06:41 PM

19. Or become a Fleet Admiral

like Nimitz.

http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq36-4.htm
"He then commanded USS Decatur and was court martialed for grounding her, an obstacle in his career which he overcame."

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Response to whistler162 (Reply #19)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 06:42 PM

20. OK, it's time for a little Gilbert and Sullivan...

 

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Response to whistler162 (Reply #19)

Sun Jan 20, 2013, 03:29 AM

22. countless captains have grounded their ships...

and 1 makes it to Admiral. Very bad batting average.

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Response to SpartanDem (Original post)

Fri Jan 18, 2013, 11:47 PM

7. Nope, not quite...the Captain and the Assistant Navigator

At least...can kiss career goodbye. It's over.

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Response to SpartanDem (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 12:09 AM

8. The Captain will probably like the Navy equivalent of Antarctica....

like he likes a hole in the head.

He'll be assigned to the staff of a low level flag, where people will whisper about him for a bit, then give him the shit-work they don't want to do, and then, he'll fail to select for promotion and, if he's allowed to stay on to get to twenty (depends on how close he is), he'll drop his letter requesting to stay and be assigned to some shore-based backwater. He'll try like hell to ratchet down his fast-track/CO/up-up-up, go-go-GO attitude and he'll either be successful at it and do well in his waning days, or he'll torture himself with "what ifs" for the rest of his career and make the lives of his subordinates miserable in the process.

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Response to SpartanDem (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 05:02 AM

9. Photo of the grounded ship here:

Check out:
http://homepost.kpbs.org/news/2013/jan/18/uss-guardian-crew-removed-navy-free-grounded-ship/

I feel for the crew. It's not looking good- they appear to be stuck hard.




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Response to SpartanDem (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 08:00 AM

10. There goes at least one career

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Response to SpartanDem (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 10:05 AM

11. Wish I had thought of saying...

"He grounds the warship he walks on."

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Response to perfessor (Reply #11)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 11:43 AM

15. That's funny! Welcome to DU, perfessor.

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Response to SpartanDem (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 10:10 AM

12. Say what?

A minesweeper that looks for stuff under water can only find a reef with its keel?

Sounds like the skipper maybe just be the country's next John McCain?

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Response to RobertEarl (Reply #12)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 12:21 PM

16. I was wondering about that, too.

They may have been doing some close-in work. A friend of mine who spent most of his Naval career on a 'sweeper spun me many a yarn, most of which began with the premise that the fleet commanders considered the mine sweepers to be expendable. If a ship has to be risked, you start with the mine sweepers.

He claimed that there was little difference between mine sweeping and mine finding, with the boat and the crew being the "finder." When it was thought that the Iranians had deployed a new type of mine in the Persian Gulf, my friend claimed the 'sweepers were deployed in front of the fleet, "like the hostages tied to the front of Lord Humongous' truck," he said.

Mine sweepers are sometimes sent out almost as pilot ships, to discover the hard way whether or not a passage is even possible. If that was the case, this captain may still have a future. My same friend claims his 'sweeper was parked in the middle of Charleston harbor, pretty much just to find out if it could survive Hurricane Hugo (it lost one anchor, but not all of them; my friend was half hoping they would be swept ashore next to the bar district).

Many of them are wooden-hulled, so that they do not trip magnetic mines so easily. That surely has to complicate a grounding operation because a wooden ship must be lifted off of a reef; dragging it with brute force is just as likely to disintegrate the hull.

I'll bet we have a couple of mine sweeper veterans aboard here at DU, who can confirm or deny my second-hand accounts above.

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Response to SpartanDem (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 01:13 PM

17. Ship stuck in Philippines used faulty map, says U.S. Navy

http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/breaking/20130119_Ship_stuck_in_Philippines_used_faulty_map_says_US_Navy.html?id=187575421

MANILA, Philippines >> An inaccurate map that mislocated a marine sanctuary may have caused a U.S. Navy minesweeper to run aground on a coral reef in the Philippines this week, the Navy said today.

All 79 officers and crew of the USS Guardian were taken off the ship for safety reasons after it struck the reef with its bow at 2 a.m. Thursday. The Navy’s Pacific Fleet, based in Hawaii, said Saturday that its ships along with several support vessels continued to conduct salvage operations that minimize environmental effects to the reef.

The Navy said in a statement that a review of Digital Nautical Charts, which are used for safe navigation by all U.S. Navy ships, found they contained inaccurate data and may have been a factor in the Guardian’s grounding. As a result, Navigator of the Navy Rear Adm. Jonathan White released precautionary guidance to all Pacific Fleet ships, saying that “initial review of navigation data indicates an error in the location of Tubbataha Reef” in the Philippines.

“While the erroneous navigation chart data is important information, no one should jump to conclusions,” said Pacific Fleet spokesman Capt. Darryn James. “It is critical that the U.S. Navy conduct a comprehensive investigation that assesses all the facts surrounding the Guardian grounding.”

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Response to neverforget (Reply #17)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 08:29 PM

21. And people complained and made fun of Apple Maps

Looks like our government can do no better.

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Response to SpartanDem (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 04:46 PM

18. Eventually it will get free

Just need to melt a bit more of Antarctica.

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