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Wed Jan 16, 2013, 06:35 PM

 

FAA orders US airlines to ground Boeing 787 Dreamliners

Source: RT

The US Federal Aviation Administration has ordered all airlines currently operating Boeing 787 jets to temporarily ground them following a series of technical failures that struck the model within a matter of days.

­The decision to ground the jets was prompted by a second incident involving a lithium ion battery failure on an All Nippon Airways flight, which forced the aircraft to make an emergency landing at Takamatsu Airport in western Japan on Wednesday, the FAA said.

The FAA has pledged to work with Boeing to “develop a corrective action plan to allow the US 787 fleet to resume operations as quickly and safely as possible.”

­DETAILS TO FOLLOW

Read more: http://rt.com/usa/news/us-faa-boeing-dreamliners-grounded-164/



RT ‏@RT_com

BREAKING: FAA orders US airlines to ground Boeing 787 Dreamliners http://on.rt.com/oelhpk

14 replies, 2156 views

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Arrow 14 replies Author Time Post
Reply FAA orders US airlines to ground Boeing 787 Dreamliners (Original post)
Fire Walk With Me Jan 2013 OP
Purveyor Jan 2013 #1
Cooley Hurd Jan 2013 #2
bluevoter4life Jan 2013 #3
triplepoint Jan 2013 #4
truthisfreedom Jan 2013 #5
triplepoint Jan 2013 #6
Agschmid Jan 2013 #7
Agschmid Jan 2013 #8
triplepoint Jan 2013 #10
Agschmid Jan 2013 #11
LeftInTX Jan 2013 #9
Major Nikon Jan 2013 #12
Nihil Jan 2013 #13
mahatmakanejeeves Jan 2013 #14

Response to Fire Walk With Me (Original post)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 06:41 PM

1. Yep. Just reported on NBC Evening News. eom

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Response to Fire Walk With Me (Original post)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 06:53 PM

2. This is a HUGE blow to Boeing

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Response to Fire Walk With Me (Original post)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 06:54 PM

3. Very bad news for Boeing

If given the option, I choose them over Airbus anytime. But this is bad news for the company. Especially after delaying delivery for years due to various issues with the program. I love the 787 and I love Boeing, but they need to fix this, otherwise the ramifications are going to be significant. I'm sure their French counterparts are wringing their hands, salivating at the thought of new A350 orders.

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Response to Fire Walk With Me (Original post)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 07:04 PM

4. Any Boeing Employees Here?

 

Got a Dreamliner battery solution for you if so. Lemme know....

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Response to triplepoint (Reply #4)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 07:36 PM

5. I wonder if they changed the chemistry, construction, or some other aspect of these batteries

compared to their other recent planes? I find it hard to believe they haven't been using lithium ion batteries of some type in their planes before this, but heck, I don't know much about planes.

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Response to truthisfreedom (Reply #5)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 08:48 PM

6. Here's a link to discussion on secondary (rechargeable) batteries onboard aircraft

 

http://www.airliners.net/aviation-forums/tech_ops/read.main/173250

Hope that helps. In the 1970s, I remember hearing about APUs that had NiCds in them. Probably those were updated to NiMH. The use of Lithium in an APU is probably not that common last century. I see no reason to risk the continued use of secondary Lithium-based batteries in anything but say, a drone aircraft.

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Response to triplepoint (Reply #6)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 08:58 PM

7. I heard... looking for a source...

that it is new (at least in that size) on the 787.



The Dreamliner was the first airliner to employ this type of battery—a technology that has caused problems in other applications, for example overheating in laptops and in electric cars. For Boeing the appeal of lithium-ion batteries, in contrast to older battery technology, is that they deliver far more power for their weight, and weight is always critical in airplane development.


http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/01/16/mayday-for-dreamliner-the-airplane-s-woes-explained.html

If I can find the source I will post otherwise I will self-delete give me one minute!

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Response to Agschmid (Reply #7)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 09:02 PM

8. "Battery burned hot enough to melt the fuselage"



A fire that broke out last week in a Boeing 787 Dreamliner could have been hot enough to melt the carbon-fiber reinforced plastic that makes up the plane’s shell, according to the results of tests the Federal Aviation Administration performed last year.


http://www.centredaily.com/2013/01/15/3466256/boeing-dreamliner-battery-fire.html

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Response to Agschmid (Reply #8)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 09:49 PM

10. Thanks for the Link!

 

Thanks Agschmid. I passed that one to my boss. We're going to try to help Boeing get out of Lithium Secondary Batteries and into another, much safer design. They sure almost got into a world of hurt with the Lithium junk. Thanks again for digging up the news story on it that had the temperature data I was looking for.

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Response to triplepoint (Reply #10)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 09:53 PM

11. No problem!

Good luck with your research!

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Response to Fire Walk With Me (Original post)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 09:28 PM

9. Ouch $$$$$$$

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Response to Fire Walk With Me (Original post)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 10:24 PM

12. I don't think it's going to be a big deal

Only 6 planes are affected and they will probably be back up in the air in a few days so long as significant modifications don't have to be done.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #12)

Thu Jan 17, 2013, 08:10 AM

13. In other news ...

> they will probably be back up in the air in a few days so long as significant modifications don't have to be done

... it has been reported that Boeing engineers have been buying up lots of AA batteries ...


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Response to Fire Walk With Me (Original post)

Thu Jan 17, 2013, 08:42 AM

14. Adding some links

FAA Press Releases

FAA Statement (01/16/2013)

For Immediate Release
January 16, 2013
Contact: Laura Brown or Brie Sachse
Phone: laura.j.brown@faa.gov or brie.sachse@faa.gov

As a result of an in-flight, Boeing 787 battery incident earlier today in Japan, the FAA will issue an emergency airworthiness directive (AD) to address a potential battery fire risk in the 787 and require operators to temporarily cease operations. Before further flight, operators of U.S.-registered, Boeing 787 aircraft must demonstrate to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) that the batteries are safe.

The FAA will work with the manufacturer and carriers to develop a corrective action plan to allow the U.S. 787 fleet to resume operations as quickly and safely as possible.

The in-flight Japanese battery incident followed an earlier 787 battery incident that occurred on the ground in Boston on January 7, 2013. The AD is prompted by this second incident involving a lithium ion battery. The battery failures resulted in release of flammable electrolytes, heat damage, and smoke on two Model 787 airplanes. The root cause of these failures is currently under investigation. These conditions, if not corrected, could result in damage to critical systems and structures, and the potential for fire in the electrical compartment.

Last Friday, the FAA announced a comprehensive review of the 787’s critical systems with the possibility of further action pending new data and information. In addition to the continuing review of the aircraft’s design, manufacture and assembly, the agency also will validate that 787 batteries and the battery system on the aircraft are in compliance with the special condition the agency issued as part of the aircraft’s certification.

United Airlines is currently the only U.S. airline operating the 787, with six airplanes in service. When the FAA issues an airworthiness directive, it also alerts the international aviation community to the action so other civil aviation authorities can take parallel action to cover the fleets operating in their own countries.


FAA Will Review Boeing 787 Design and Production (01/11/2013)

For Immediate Release
January 11, 2013
Contact: Laura J. Brown or Brie N. Sachse
Phone: 202-267-3883

WASHINGTON – In light of a series of recent events, the FAA will conduct a comprehensive review of the Boeing 787 critical systems, including the design, manufacture and assembly. The purpose of the review is to validate the work conducted during the certification process and further ensure that the aircraft meets the FAA’s high level of safety.

“The safety of the traveling public is our top priority,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. “This review will help us look at the root causes and do everything we can to safeguard against similar events in the future.”

A team of FAA and Boeing engineers and inspectors will conduct this joint review, with an emphasis on the aircraft’s electrical power and distribution system. The review will also examine how the electrical and mechanical systems interact with each other.

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