HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » Latest Breaking News (Forum) » Turf War Feared After Syr...
Introducing Discussionist: A new forum by the creators of DU

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 06:51 AM

 

Turf War Feared After Syrian Rebel Leader Killed

Source: Reuters

Amman - The killing of a senior Islamist rebel commander near Syria’s border with Turkey could indicate a turf war between armed groups that will hamper their struggle to overthrow Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, sources told Reuters. Thaer al-Waqqas, northern commander of al-Farouq Brigades, one of Syria’s largest rebel groups, was shot dead at a rebel-held position in the town of Sermin, a few kilometers from Turkey, early on Wednesday morning, rebel sources said.

Al-Waqqas, they said, had been suspected of involvement in the killing four months ago of Firas al-Absi, a main jihadist leader in al Qaeda-linked al-Nusra Front, which Washington dubbed a terrorist organisation in December.

In addition to chronic supply problems and a shortage of financing and heavy weapons, the lack of unity among Syria’s rebels has held back their efforts to dislodge Assad’s forces.

“The assassins came in a white car, disembarked and riddled Waqqas with bullets as he was at a food supply depot,” one of the rebels said. He said suspicion immediately turned on Nusra. “Absi’s brother is a commander in (the city of) Homs. He vowed revenge for Firas, and it seems that he has carried out his promise,” the rebel said.

Read more: http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/international/turf-war-feared-after-syrian-rebel-leader-killed/565393

9 replies, 1513 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 9 replies Author Time Post
Reply Turf War Feared After Syrian Rebel Leader Killed (Original post)
UnrepentantLiberal Jan 2013 OP
dipsydoodle Jan 2013 #1
JustABozoOnThisBus Jan 2013 #2
Comrade Grumpy Jan 2013 #3
leveymg Jan 2013 #4
Comrade Grumpy Jan 2013 #5
Dokkie Jan 2013 #6
UnrepentantLiberal Jan 2013 #8
leveymg Jan 2013 #9
Xithras Jan 2013 #7

Response to UnrepentantLiberal (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 07:17 AM

1. "Turf War"

Getting like gang warfare. With the apparent number of rebel groups involved this is hardly surprising.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to dipsydoodle (Reply #1)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:16 AM

2. This could be a "lose-lose" sort of war

... for many factions.

If the rebels win, then the leader who emerges from the melee may or may not be an improvement over Assad, for the people of Syria (and possibly, Israel).

If the rebels win, they will not be "our friends" because we didn't arm them (at least, not openly), and didn't run a no-fly, no-tank, no-truck, no-artillery zone.

If the Assad regime wins, he will not be "our friend" because we (POTUS, SoS, etc) publicly called for his removal.



Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to UnrepentantLiberal (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 01:09 PM

3. What a nice bunch of folks.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Comrade Grumpy (Reply #3)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 03:08 PM

4. We can count ourselves among them. We have no plausible deniability. What a stupid covert war -

we neither used enough force to bring a quick, overpowering termination of hostilities nor did we stay far enough away from the proxies to claim to have kept our own hands clean. We got splattered and there's no easy wash up afterwards.

We instead put ourselves right in the middle of a bunch of well-armed terrorist armies, all of them pissed as hell and looking for vengence, Jihad, and another target for pay when the carpet in front of this thing gets rolled up. I have a really bad feeling about this one.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to leveymg (Reply #4)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 04:51 PM

5. Yup. The last two years may just have been the prelude.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to leveymg (Reply #4)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 05:59 PM

6. I was listening to NPR news

 

and the reporter was saying how the US were worried that the Islamic rebels who helped overthrown Gaddafi were now streaming into Mali to destabilize that country's govt. And am like "the US worried?" aren't those rebels our guys?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Dokkie (Reply #6)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 06:16 PM

8. Many are coming from Iraq.

 

Syria conflict: New insight into shadowy jihadist group



A new report has cast unprecedented light on Jabhat al-Nusra - the shadowy al-Qaeda-linked group in Syria that has become a key player in the conflict. The document by the UK-based think-tank Quilliam Foundation says the group has developed from al-Qaeda militants in Iraq and now has about 5,000 members.

It says the group - which has claimed deadly attacks against the government - will fight on even if President Bashar al-Assad's regime falls.

The group, the document says, is now "adapting to the changing conflict, and making preparations for a post-Assad future". This includes "the procurement of heavy weaponry".

The rebel group has alarmed Western and Arab governments by its fanaticism and links to al-Qaeda, the BBC's security correspondent Frank Gardner says.

More: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-20950132

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Dokkie (Reply #6)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 06:51 PM

9. They aren't "our guys". They belong to the intel agencies of KSA, Qatar, and those other wonderful

folks who brought you 9/11. Reasons to be worried, 1, 2, 3 . . .

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to UnrepentantLiberal (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 06:09 PM

7. Most people are predicting that Syria is heading in the direction of Somalia or Lebanon.

The difference between the two primarily being the willingness of the various groups to carve the country up. If they do, it will become Somalia, with no central government and the nation divided into armed camps. If not, it will end up like Lebanon, with a token government in charge but the country devastated by border-to-border warfare until they finally destroy enough of the country that everyone capitulates.

In the beginning, everyone was fighting against Assad. Now, everyone is fighting FOR something. Because all of the "FORS" are different, people aren't just going to go home when Assad falls. He's no longer the goal for many of these groups.

The biggie, of course, is Al Nusra. They're the most effective and best armed combat wing of the rebellion, and have made it perfectly clear that they're fighting FOR the establishment of an authoritarian anti-western Islamic state. They aren't going to put their guns away and accept a secular democracy just because Assad is beaten. There's a damned good reason that the White House has labeled them a terrorist group.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread