HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » Latest Breaking News (Forum) » For Americans Under 50, S...

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 08:35 PM

For Americans Under 50, Stark Findings on Health

Source: NY Times

The findings were stark. Deaths before age 50 accounted for about two-thirds of the difference in life expectancy between males in the United States and their counterparts in 16 other developed countries, and about one-third of the difference for females. The countries in the analysis included Canada, Japan, Australia, France, Germany and Spain.

Car accidents, gun violence and drug overdoses were major contributors to years of life lost by Americans before age 50.

Americans also had the lowest probability over all of surviving to the age of 50. The report’s second chapter details health indicators for youths where the United States ranks near or at the bottom. There are so many that the list takes up four pages. Chronic diseases, including heart disease, also played a role for people under 50.

The panel sought to explain the poor performance. It noted the United States has a highly fragmented health care system, with limited primary care resources and a large uninsured population. It has the highest rates of poverty among the countries studied.

Education also played a role. Americans who have not graduated from high school die from diabetes at three times the rate of those with some college, Dr. Woolf said. In the other countries, more generous social safety nets buffer families from the health consequences of poverty, the report said.


Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/10/health/americans-under-50-fare-poorly-on-health-measures-new-report-says.html?_r=0



Please read the whole article - crossposting in Good Reads

24 replies, 3892 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 24 replies Author Time Post
Reply For Americans Under 50, Stark Findings on Health (Original post)
underpants Jan 2013 OP
Sekhmets Daughter Jan 2013 #1
kestrel91316 Jan 2013 #2
ReRe Jan 2013 #4
kath Jan 2013 #3
City Lights Jan 2013 #8
YOHABLO Jan 2013 #5
AndyTiedye Jan 2013 #12
SunSeeker Jan 2013 #16
Gore1FL Jan 2013 #6
DemoTex Jan 2013 #7
azurnoir Jan 2013 #17
RebelOne Jan 2013 #9
bitchkitty Jan 2013 #23
marions ghost Jan 2013 #24
Demeter Jan 2013 #10
jtuck004 Jan 2013 #11
Jenoch Jan 2013 #13
ErikJ Jan 2013 #14
watoos Jan 2013 #15
area51 Jan 2013 #20
LongTomH Jan 2013 #18
underpants Jan 2013 #21
Nay Jan 2013 #19
marions ghost Jan 2013 #22

Response to underpants (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 08:39 PM

1. A national shame....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to underpants (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 08:45 PM

2. It would help greatly if we did something about the deplorable incidence of

obesity in the US. Our incidence of diabetes would plummet, for one thing.

But we're not allowed to criticize the obese or suggest to them that there is a PROBLEM that THEY need to personally address.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kestrel91316 (Reply #2)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 09:10 PM

4. Honey-bunny, obesity is most often an indication of poverty.

People don't "choose" to be obese. Another element to consider is genetics. People who are at the bottom of the barrel in America have virtually no way out of poverty anymore. We used to have upward mobility, but I think that's pretty much a thing of the past. Those obese people are actually the victims of a sick sick society. Deplorable poverty is the real problem. Just saying...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to underpants (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 09:08 PM

3. USA! USA! USA! Greatest country in the world! We're Number One!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kath (Reply #3)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 09:29 PM

8. All that, plus best health care in the world!

We *so* rule!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to underpants (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 09:12 PM

5. It's not just obesity .. but also lack of access to preventive healthcare ...

due to a health care system based on profits to health insurance providers. We all know that .. so when are we going to do something about it? OBAMA SOLD US OUT ON SINGLE PAYER FOLKS.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to YOHABLO (Reply #5)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 10:13 PM

12. Obama Couldn't Get Single-Payer, Folks

Neither could Hillary, neither can anyone else.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to YOHABLO (Reply #5)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 11:03 PM

16. The ACA embraces preventive care; all such care must be provided without a co-pay.

That includes really expensive preventive care, like colonoscopies.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to underpants (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 09:21 PM

6. In just a little over three years, I'll be invincible! n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to underpants (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 09:28 PM

7. American Exceptionalism

Oxymoronic

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DemoTex (Reply #7)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 11:05 PM

17. more like Orwellian n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to underpants (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 09:33 PM

9. I am 74 and did not graduate from high school,

but I always worked at good paying jobs. That claim that those who did not graduate die from diabetes at three times the rate of those with some college is a bunch of crock. My last job was as a copy editor and all my co-workers were college gradates.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to RebelOne (Reply #9)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 09:42 AM

23. You're exceptional.

The average high school dropout does not become a professional. Often they work at physically demanding and/or just plain unhealthy jobs. Low income generally means low nutrition unless you really work at it.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bitchkitty (Reply #23)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 11:12 AM

24. Yes times have changed

Both my parents got professional PR/writing jobs with only HS degrees. Impossible now.

Job insecurity affects many Americans like never before, although the 80's were pretty bad. I'd say it's even worse now.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to underpants (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 09:39 PM

10. So, what are we gonna do about this?

Ignore what other nations do, because it's Dreaded Socialism?

Exploit the Social Darwinism of starving the poor so that the Rich have even more?

Yeah, that's the ticket!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to underpants (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 10:07 PM

11. They want $72 for the report, but one excerpt I've seen says


"Even Americans who are white, insured, have college education or high income or engaged in healthy behaviors seem to be in poorer health than people with similar characteristics in other nations,” Woolf said.
...
Car accidents, gun violence and drug overdoses were major contributors to years of life lost by Americans before age 50.
...


They compared rich people across nations, how about the effect on people across our income disparities? It's alluded to in the reference about diabetes, I guess, but I would like to see.

Maybe have to make the trek to the University, see if I can read it on their system.

Thank you for that. Maybe people's health would be a way to open the window into their thinking...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to underpants (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 10:29 PM

13. "Car accidents, gun violence and drug overdoses were major contributors to years of life lost by

Americans before age 50"

Two out of three of these are mostly lifestyle choices.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to underpants (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 10:50 PM

14. Corporate exploitation--make 'em sick, then make 'em pay up.

The junk-food/drink lobbyists and health insurance lobbyists are probably working as a team.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to underpants (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 10:55 PM

15. Everything is going according to plan.

If I didn't have health care I would have been dead 12 years ago. I was diagnosed with cancer from a routine checkup. I had no symptoms. Lots of people out there without healthcare.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to watoos (Reply #15)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 03:38 AM

20. Welcome to DU, watoos. n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to underpants (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 11:55 PM

18. America's greater inequality also contributes to a lowered life expectancy

There are now over 170 studies of income inequality in relation to various aspects of health. Life expectancy, infant mortality, low birth weight and self-rated health have repeatedly been shown to be worse in more unequal societies. These studies have been reviewed in the journal Social Science and Medicine.

Researchers sometimes disagree about the pathways leading from inequality to worse population health. The most consistent interpretation of all the evidence is that the main route hinges on the way inequality makes life more stressful. Chronic stress is known to affect the cardiovascular and immune systems and to lead to more rapid aging. Inequality makes social relations more stressful (see section on Trust and Community Life), by increasing status differences and status competition. These effects are important: Americans living in more equal states live around 4 years longer than those living in more unequal states.

This is from The Equality Trust UK report on the effects of inequality on physical health. They also document an increased incidence of obesity in more unequal countries.

We found that obesity among men and women (see graph), as well as calorie intake and deaths from diabetes, are related to income inequality in rich countries. In addition, obesity in adults is also related to inequality in the 50 US states; and the percentage of children who are overweight is related to inequality both internationally and in the USA.


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to LongTomH (Reply #18)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 06:54 AM

21. Very interesting

Thanks

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 01:41 AM

19. I have to think that the stress of living in this weird, commercialized, frantic culture also

has a lot to do with lousy health outcomes.

Plus the utter depravity of the food/agro lobby.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Nay (Reply #19)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:43 AM

22. Stress

fear of losing everything you've got. Stress of job insecurity. Scrabbling for basic health care. Scrabbling for food & essentials. Living in a society where it feels necessary to own guns for self-protection. Living in a society where there is no sense of community. No sense of government working for the people, only for business.

Stress kills.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread