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Wed Dec 26, 2012, 04:37 PM

Euroscepticism growing among voters, Guardian/ICM poll finds

Source: The Guardian

The public mood of Euroscepticism is hardening, according to an exclusive Guardian/ICM poll that finds 51% of respondents would vote to take Britain out of the EU, against just 40% who say they would vote to stay in.

The news comes as the prime minister prepares to give a widely anticipated speech on Britain's relationship with the EU in the new year.

The last time ICM asked the same question, in autumn 2011, opinion was already leaning in the anti-European direction, by 49% against 40%, but a slight hardening of opinion since that time means that anti-EU feeling is now just in the majority.

This marks a turnaround from similar polls conducted in the earliest years of this century. When ICM asked a slightly differently worded question in May 2001, the public indicated that it wanted Britain to remain a member of Europe by 68% to 19%.

Read more: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/dec/26/euroscepticism-growing-voters-poll

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Reply Euroscepticism growing among voters, Guardian/ICM poll finds (Original post)
alp227 Dec 2012 OP
lovuian Dec 2012 #1
David__77 Dec 2012 #2
T_i_B Dec 2012 #6
Ghost Dog Dec 2012 #3
Selatius Dec 2012 #4
andypandy Dec 2012 #5

Response to alp227 (Original post)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 04:40 PM

1. I am not surprised at all

if Britain would leave the EU

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Response to alp227 (Original post)

Thu Dec 27, 2012, 01:02 AM

2. Why this is associated with the right I don't know.

The Left should be leading the charge to smash the EU and other continental structures that impede popular sovereignty. The EU is an anti-democratic monstrosity.

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Response to David__77 (Reply #2)

Thu Dec 27, 2012, 07:45 AM

6. It was a major hobby horse for the British right wing in the 1990's

In fact one of the main reasons why the UK Conservative Party did so badly in that era was their preoccupation with infighting over the single currency.

At present the main force dominating debate on Europe in Britain is the UK Independence party. A hard-right group whose main cause is withdrawal from the EU.

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Response to alp227 (Original post)

Thu Dec 27, 2012, 04:35 AM

3. Inglis out.

Kick them out now.

Celts, of course, free to choose.

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Response to alp227 (Original post)

Thu Dec 27, 2012, 05:13 AM

4. I believe the EU's response to the Great Recession may have worsened attitudes towards the idea.

As much as I opposed the nearly 800 billion spent on TARP and the bailout for AIG in the United States, the point is the United States provided a unified and somewhat rapid answer to the major problem facing the US economy. On the other hand, the ECB and the European Union struggled to find a solution that all member states were happy with. Deals had to be cut between member states, and positions kept changing.

With the British, they were the only big player who had the luxury of control of their own currency under the British Pound, and they didn't have to worry about a member state borrowing recklessly against the common currency, unlike other mainland powers such as Germany or France in relation to Greece. It must've been somewhat disconcerting watching all their neighbors across the channel constantly bickering over whether there will be a bailout, and when a bailout was agreed to, there would be arguments over how big it should be and in what form and stipulations it would have.

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Response to Selatius (Reply #4)

Thu Dec 27, 2012, 06:32 AM

5. absolutely.

you're almost certainly correct - the EU, both as specific institutions and as an idea - has taken a fearful battering over the problems with the Euro currency: the whiff of incompetance, denial and 'goal-post shifting' (there have been nearly 20 'make or break', 'last chance' summits held to deal with it over the past 4 years, and each one kicks the problem down the road while claiming to have solved the crisis - a delusion which lasts about 2 days...) has meant that 'the EU' has cemented its reputation for dithering incompetence.

its also been illustrative that the vaunted 'structures' of the EU that were supposed to manage and 'referee' the competing and divergent interests of all the member states have been completely bypassed by the reality of power politics - Germany and the northern European states hold the purse strings, and what they have said, regardless of what the structures should have done, or not done, has gone, while the southern European states have been placed fully at the bottom of the food chain.

the Euro-scepticism is no surprise - Europe has not covered itself in glory, the Euro has been shown to have potentially catastrophic weaknesses, Europe has reverted to old-style power politics, and what has saved the UK has been its ability to restict its liabilities and print money to pay for them. in such circumstances, you'd be a fool for not not breathing a sigh of relief and saying 'thank Christ for that...'.

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