HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » Latest Breaking News (Forum) » California fails to win w...

Mon Dec 24, 2012, 07:50 PM

California fails to win waivers from restrictive No Child Left Behind education law

Source: SJ Mercury news

Signalling California again is marching to its own drum -- perhaps trailing the parade -- the federal government has denied the state's request for a waiver from a key U.S. education law, thus assuring that schools will have to keep striving to meet what's generally accepted as unachievable goals, and be punished for missing them.

Like other states, California had been hoping to win a reprieve from the restrictive provisions of the No Child Left Behind law. Among other terms, the law punishes schools and districts if not enough of their students reach proficiency in English and math.

With 33 states and the District of Columbia winning waivers from the law, and 10 more with waiver applications pending, that leaves California in the select company of states that still must strive to meet escalating federal goals.

The sticking point for the Golden State was whether it was willing to evaluate teachers based in part on how well their students do on standardized tests.

Read more: http://www.mercurynews.com/rss/ci_22255903

5 replies, 1580 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 5 replies Author Time Post
Reply California fails to win waivers from restrictive No Child Left Behind education law (Original post)
alp227 Dec 2012 OP
JDPriestly Dec 2012 #1
iemitsu Dec 2012 #2
JDPriestly Dec 2012 #3
iemitsu Dec 2012 #4
roody Dec 2012 #5

Response to alp227 (Original post)

Mon Dec 24, 2012, 10:22 PM

1. I'm proud of California for continuing to treat both its students and its teachers as individuals

and not just as test-score numbers.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to JDPriestly (Reply #1)

Tue Dec 25, 2012, 03:44 AM

2. I agree, California will be ahead of the rest of us when we have to put our education

systems back together.
This is another aspect of Obama's administration I just can't fathom. Why on earth is he continuing the attack on teachers and public schools? Like his proposal to reduce SS benefits this is not something Obama has to do yet he acts every bit as evil and pigheaded as any republican when it comes to schools.
Charter schools have proven to be no better than public schools, even with select groups of students. As well as failing academically to outshine public schools charters are not more cost effective.
Hopefully California will hold out until the privatization movement is discredited and their teachers can be spared the insult thrust at them by Obama and his misguided education department.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to iemitsu (Reply #2)

Tue Dec 25, 2012, 04:35 AM

3. We recently listened to a TED talk in which the speaker said something to the effect that

the brains of creative people, writers, artists, etc. work by crossing information and experiences to construct metaphors.

The focus on "basics" that leaves so little time for children to form metaphors, to think and feel freely and playfully and to develop their artistic talents could actually hinder a lot of creativity in our country. The ability to think in metaphors is hard to test. In fact I don't think it is tested on those standardized tests. How could it be?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to JDPriestly (Reply #3)

Tue Dec 25, 2012, 02:29 PM

4. I did not see that TED talk but it sounds like it supports many other studies

that suggest too much structure stifles creativity. Other education systems, whom we compare ourselves to negatively, like Germany, Japan, and China send education officials here (or they used to) to see what encourages our students to think independently and creatively.
We also compare all of our student's test scores to the college bound student's scores in other school systems. This, of course, puts our scores at a disadvantage which is never identified or explained to the American people. In fact, when one disaggregates the test scores by income it turns out that American students, whose families are not struggling financially, do as well or better than students from the highest performing systems. Nearly half of our public school students live in households where the income is below the Federal poverty level while the countries we compare ourselves to have less than 12% of their students living in poverty.
Since our income disparity is greater than it has ever been and the powers that be don't want to change that situation we will use evidence collected from a stressed educational system to argue that teachers have failed.
As someone who has taught for more than 20 years in public schools, I can attest that no student is ever done (being educated) when they leave our classrooms. All students process information uniquely and in their own time. Becoming educated is a life-long adventure. No test, no matter when or how it is administered, can accurately measure creative thinking.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to alp227 (Original post)

Tue Dec 25, 2012, 02:58 PM

5. The Feds don't like our good,

strong unions.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread