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Wed Dec 19, 2012, 09:50 PM

 

N.J. autism rate soared in 4 years

Source: By Lindy Washburn, The Record, December 18, 2012

New Jersey's autism rate nearly doubled in four years, according to new research published Monday that expands upon previous national studies.

Of the 8-year-old children in four sample New Jersey counties, one in 57 had autism in 2006, compared with one in 94 just four years earlier, researchers from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey found.

The findings represent "the best data we have for knowing the accurate complete prevalence of autism in our region," said Walter Zahorodny, the study's lead author. They were based on an analysis of school and medical records for all children living in Hudson, Essex, Union and Ocean counties who were born in 1998, a total of more than 30,000. The sample provided a good cross-section of New Jersey in terms of ethnicity and social-economic background.

New Jersey's autism rate is among the highest in the nation.

"The question is, where does the trend level off?" Zahorodny said.

Read more: http://www.northjersey.com/news/183892061_N_J__autism_rate_soared_in_4_years.html?page=all&scpromo=1

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Reply N.J. autism rate soared in 4 years (Original post)
proverbialwisdom Dec 2012 OP
Recursion Dec 2012 #1
MADem Dec 2012 #2
bucolic_frolic Dec 2012 #6
MADem Dec 2012 #29
proverbialwisdom Dec 2012 #3
Recursion Dec 2012 #4
proverbialwisdom Dec 2012 #5
Recursion Dec 2012 #15
proverbialwisdom Dec 2012 #19
Recursion Dec 2012 #23
proverbialwisdom Dec 2012 #25
fasttense Dec 2012 #12
Jackpine Radical Dec 2012 #16
Recursion Dec 2012 #17
Jackpine Radical Dec 2012 #20
ReRe Dec 2012 #7
southerncrone Dec 2012 #8
caseymoz Dec 2012 #9
fasttense Dec 2012 #13
dipsydoodle Dec 2012 #10
Ilsa Dec 2012 #11
proverbialwisdom Dec 2012 #18
southerncrone Dec 2012 #32
Recursion Dec 2012 #14
proverbialwisdom Dec 2012 #21
proverbialwisdom Dec 2012 #22
WestCoastLib Dec 2012 #24
southerncrone Dec 2012 #33
greiner3 Dec 2012 #26
mainer Dec 2012 #27
proverbialwisdom Dec 2012 #30
proverbialwisdom Dec 2012 #31
mainer Dec 2012 #28

Response to proverbialwisdom (Original post)

Wed Dec 19, 2012, 09:51 PM

1. Eh. Behavioral health people are rewarded for a diagnosis

You have to be careful with diagnosis rates of a disease with unknown etiology and fundamentally subjective presentation.

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Response to Recursion (Reply #1)

Wed Dec 19, 2012, 09:55 PM

2. I wondered if it was environmental or diagnostic enthusiasm. nt

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Response to MADem (Reply #2)

Wed Dec 19, 2012, 11:03 PM

6. Awareness may have uncovered hidden cases

but some doctors may find diagnosis lucrative

and the environment may be reaching a tipping point.

So to hedge your bets, all three may be correct to some extent.

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Response to bucolic_frolic (Reply #6)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 05:45 PM

29. Yep--hard to know. If we could remove the profit motive from the diagnostic piece, we might get

closer to an answer...

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Response to Recursion (Reply #1)

Wed Dec 19, 2012, 09:59 PM

3. Ruled out by the article: "... 80-85% of children in the study had the most severe form of autism."

 

"This is a call to action for the state and providers of all disciplines to endorse and utilize evidence-based practices" to give individuals with autism and their families the best odds for an improved quality of life, said Suzanne Buchanan, interim executive director of Autism New Jersey, a non-profit organization.

She found it remarkable that 80 to 85 percent of the children in the study had the most severe form of autism. "While the vast majority of individuals on the spectrum need support services, individuals on the severe end need them even more so," Buchanan said.

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Response to proverbialwisdom (Reply #3)

Wed Dec 19, 2012, 10:10 PM

4. "The most severe form of autism" just means "not Asperger's or PDD-NOS"

Last edited Thu Dec 20, 2012, 12:59 PM - Edit history (1)

And, again, the presentation is subjective.

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Response to Recursion (Reply #4)

Wed Dec 19, 2012, 10:19 PM

5. That's clearly inaccurate. Check any of these links.

 

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Response to proverbialwisdom (Reply #5)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 09:19 AM

15. Did you read them? They're saying what I said

Severe autism is sometimes called autistic disorder, low-functioning autism, classic autism, "Kanner" autism or profound autism. Simply put, it is the most severe of the autism spectrum disorders.


The autism spectrum disorders are autism (a.k.a. "severe autism"), Aspberger's, and PPD-NOS. That very first link mentions that people use the phrases "mild autism" or "high-functioning autism" but those terms have no diagnostic criteria.

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Response to Recursion (Reply #4)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 10:46 AM

19. Sloppy spelling x2. Rushing?

 

You cannot be serious that "the most severe" forms of autism are subjective diagnoses. Sorry, no dice.

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Response to proverbialwisdom (Reply #19)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 11:03 AM

23. Since that wasn't what I said, I don't have to be serious about it

I said the *presentation* was "subjective", which has a specific meaning in psychology and psychiatry.

I misspelled PDD-NOS, you're right. But it remains the case that "severe autism" means "ASD that is neither Aspberger's nor PDD-NOS".

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Response to Recursion (Reply #23)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 12:28 PM

25. Nonissue side-show diversion for me, sorry.

 

Tip: Edit your posts to fix spelling for Asperger, too.

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Response to Recursion (Reply #1)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 07:35 AM

12. It's the LEAD ingested by children

Mother Jones came out with a great article on the affects of Lead in gasoline. Though in many states lead in gasoline has been banned, the lead is still in the environment especially in large urban areas.

The thing about lead poisoning is that it affects boys worse than girls and mimics many types of diseases. And the lead levels in the blood decline but the damage stays with children through adulthood.

Mother Jones only has a portion of the article on-line, but I have a subscription. Here is a link http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2011/05/lead-prisons-and-crack-explaining-drop-violent-crime

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Response to Recursion (Reply #1)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 10:07 AM

16. You have just described the majority of mental health diagnoses.

"Mental health" has always been a poor fit in the Medical Model.

DSM-5 isn't going to make things any better.

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Response to Jackpine Radical (Reply #16)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 10:24 AM

17. Unfortunately

Though "Intermittent Explosive Disorder" is a pretty cool name.

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Response to Recursion (Reply #17)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 10:47 AM

20. Ya know, it really pisses me off when

anyone brings that one up.

I get so mad I could just…

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Response to proverbialwisdom (Original post)

Wed Dec 19, 2012, 11:47 PM

7. There's no doubt that the incidence of autism is rising....

.... what I want to know is WHY.

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Response to ReRe (Reply #7)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 12:43 AM

8. Yes. WHY?

And why did it just suddenly appear out of nowhere in the '80's? It is rising at an alarming rate all over the country. I personally believe that aspartame is part of the reason, just my gut feeling & it matches the timing.

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Response to southerncrone (Reply #8)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 01:21 AM

9. Actually, there are so many chemicals in our enviroment


I think aspartame would be one of the least likely. Why? Because at least it's been tested and it would be rather easy to correlate autism and aspartame use in the child or the parent. For all the other hundreds of chemicals, scents, solvents, cleaners, fire retardants, not to mention insecticides and herbicides, we know next to nothing about how effect neuro-development. With food additives at least some testing is required. But if the chemical is environmental . . .

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Response to caseymoz (Reply #9)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 07:42 AM

13. Yes chemicals like lead

Lead is everywhere in our environment because it was added to gasoline (though it has been banned). It settled everywhere and gets kicked up especially on hot days. The damage to children from lead follows the poverty areas because that is where the largest concentration of gasoline use is found. Private planes still use lead based fuel so people near private airports are still at high risk. But if you do any renovations in your older home, you kick up that lead all over again.

Checkout Mother Jones article. http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2011/05/lead-prisons-and-crack-explaining-drop-violent-crime

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Response to southerncrone (Reply #8)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 05:26 AM

10. There seems to be a genetic component.

If that is the case then you'd need to go back a generation or so to find other likely causes.

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Response to dipsydoodle (Reply #10)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 07:30 AM

11. A genetic component may mean that under

Perfectly normal, healthy circumstances, a child will be conceived and born, carry whatever "autism genes" (as yet unidentified) and never have cause to see a developmental pediatrician. But the same couple, living in a genetically hostile environment (polluted) gives birth to a special needs child.

I think I carry the genes. But I never needed speech therapy or any other therapies. Not the case with my son. He's very autistic (PDD-NOS), has severe receptive and expressive speech problems and learning disabilities.

I think health of the environment makes the difference.

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Response to southerncrone (Reply #8)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 10:38 AM

18. Autism increased dramatically during the 90's, not the 80's.

 

This information is from the recent Congressional hearing on autism and is included in the Congressional Record.

http://www.ageofautism.com/2012/12/safeminds-mark-blaxill-testimony-at-autism-hearing.html#more
SLIDE #5 - Autism Time Trends

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Response to proverbialwisdom (Reply #18)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 02:00 AM

32. It began showing up in kids born in the '80's, but

increased dramatically in those born in the '90's & after.

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Response to Recursion (Reply #14)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 10:49 AM

21. Your citations are from 2005, 2005, 1991. Stale.

 

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Response to Recursion (Reply #14)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 10:57 AM

22. Dr. Tom Insel, 2009, MIT: increase in autism is real.

 

http://mitworld.mit.edu/video/756

Autism: What Do We Know? What Do We Need?
Thomas Insel
December 2, 2009


VIDEO Running Time: 1:15:16


http://www.ageofautism.com/2010/06/iacc-head-dr-tom-insel-talks-about-autism-at-mitdec-2009.html#more

IACC Head Dr. Tom Insel Talks about Autism at MIT - Dec 2009
By Anne Dachel


Dr. Thomas Insel, chair of the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC) and director of the National Institute of Mental Health can be found on several Internet sites talking about autism. Over the last few months, he's been to places like the National Institutes of Health and the Mass. Institute of Technology lecturing on the disorder plaguing one percent of U.S. children.

In Dec 2009, he spoke at MIT (below). This was four months after he testified on autism before U.S. Senator Tom Harkin's subcommittee last Aug. In Aug, Insel still wasn't sure if there are really more kids with autism, but by Dec, he was convinced--the increase is real.

<>

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Response to proverbialwisdom (Original post)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 12:23 PM

24. A lot of faulty Diagnosis and scamming the system

I'm not versed enough to say that accounts for the entire rise in autism, but I do have these experiences to go on.

1. My best friend is a special Ed teacher. He sayss there is an absolute ton of mis-diagnosis going on. For one thing, while teachers jobs are being cut left and right, budgets for Special Ed are gaining money and throughout massive teacher layoffs year after year, my friend (and special ed teachers) are left untouched. It's a money maker for the school system.

2. He also told me a lot of parents are now fighting to put their normal kids into special ed classes to cheat the system for getting into colleges. He's told me that he's had numerous kids in his class that are just fine, but parents just want them to have perfect grades. The teachers try to get the kids out of their classes, but the parents are fighting to keep them in. It seems counter-intuitive that parents would want their kids to have the stigma of being in special ed, but apparently it's happening. The benefit they are getting is that they can take exams basically as many times as they want until they get it right, if they are considered to have an emotional, or mental disability.

3. Teachers wanted to have my nephew tested for Autism a number of years ago. He's not even close to it. He's just an introvert. My brother/sis n' law fought it hard enough so that they didn't have to test him. They weren't worried he wouldn't be diagnosed fine, but they didn't want it on his record and to have people in the future make judgement about him. He's in college now (for the record) and perfectly fine. They handed them a pamphlet that asks questions and tells warning signs and said he shows a number of them...most of them are completely ridiculous and could be applied to most kids. But like in #1, my nephew's school district at that time had a high number of special ed classes and was receiving among the most money for it in the state. They were basically just trying to get as many diagnosis as they could for their students as a cash grab.


So, are cases of autism increasing? Maybe, but the number is clearly heavily inflated. Also, in general, mental and emotional illness was completely covered up and hidden only a few short decades ago out of embarrassment, and the stigma is rapidly going away which does also make legitimate reported cases of it more likely. I'm skeptical that there is some kind of epidemic and that it isn't mostly a combination of the above.

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Response to WestCoastLib (Reply #24)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 02:03 AM

33. It also qualifies them for extra govt. money if they are on assistance.

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Response to proverbialwisdom (Original post)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 02:14 PM

26. While I am not trained;

But my nearly 3 year old grandson most certainly is on the 'autism spectrum.'

Not to bore you with symptoms, I want to mention he was born January 11, 2010 in Panama City Beach FL and has lived there his entire life until he and his family (he drove) moved up here to Columbus OH late October.

Also, he has the 3 anagram precursor to COPD (as you can tell, I can't remember what the anagram stands for much less the actual anagram). His doctor says it's too early to tell if he will/will not develop full blown asthma.

His 7 yo sister, who was a very healthy girl up until Deepwater Horizon, has since also developed the same 3 letter anagram. She is close to a full blown case of asthma and has been to the emergency room twice. She has also developed a bad case of allergies, yes you guessed it, all after the spill.

My son and his wife seem to be symptom free. This makes me think it's the younger lungs that are mostly affected.

Since I mentioned my son, he actually was one of those hired by BP to do clean up a bit west of Panama City. PC got some tar balls (I went to PC just after the spill and collected half a dozen of them. They are all much smaller than my little finger nail.)

He got sick and passed out on the beach. He tells everyone that it was because of dehydration but he is part of the 'payout' BP has to pay to those physically affected. He is hard hardheaded and pretty macho so there is speculation that the cause of him fainting was much more serious than the combo of heat, sun and not enough water.

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Response to proverbialwisdom (Original post)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 02:49 PM

27. Rising age of fathers?

Autism rates correlated with paternal age.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/23/health/fathers-age-is-linked-to-risk-of-autism-and-schizophrenia.html

In cities, I think you're seeing a lot of older fathers having kids with their second, younger wives.

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Response to mainer (Reply #27)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 06:51 PM

30. The NYT is the last place to look for accurate reporting on the subject of autism, sadly.

 

http://www.google.com/search?q=autism+military+families+site:ageofautism.com&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en&client=safari
Google: autism military families site:ageofautism.com


http://www.ageofautism.com/2012/08/de-novo-mutations-and-autism.html

De Novo Mutations and Autism

By Teresa Conrick
August 29, 2012 at 5:44 AM


It's been all over the news and it really is NOT NEW news.  The idea of paternal age and these "de novo mutations" has been one of the many exaggerated "THE reason" studies for autism over the years.  Many think it is a wasteful approach to exploring autism's causation as it does little in stopping  the rising epidemic numbers and nothing for those affected by a constellation of extreme health issues and behavioral symptoms.

<>

Many would like to ONLY research gestational causes as it then gives the flavor that autism is solely "genetic" when much evidence shows vulnerability before and after birth to be the increasing factor causing the epidemic numbers. The paternal de novo mutation caused by mercury exposure does exemplify the research done by Mark Blaxill and Dan Olmsted in their book, The Age of Autism: Mercury, Medicine, and a Man-Made Epidemic:

"We believe that  autism was newly diagnosed in the 1930s for the simple reason that it was new.  The organic chemicals industry that grew out of chemical warfare industry research during World War I led to new commercial uses for mercury, including the introduction of some extraordinarily toxic compounds made from ethylmercury.  This, our research suggests, led directly to the first cases of autism......families cluster around the medical profession, agriculture, and forestry---the three biggest risk factors for exposure to mercury in its newest and most toxic form.....Elizabeth Peabody Trevett's work with the well-baby clinic and its diphtheria vaccination component at Harvard is the most direct sign of a connection to heightened risk of infant vaccination with a thimerosal- containing  vaccine in the first cases....The way some of the early cases clustered around Baltimore and its active anti-diphtheria campaign starting in the early 1930s is also noteworthy."

Very noteworthy yet the fear of this truth has many scrambling to deny it.  Why is that?  Maybe because there is an entire industry of billions of dollars tied up... We all need to demand research and treatments that will stop this epidemic and help those affected today.  Our children and our descendants are so worth this effort.

Teresa Conrick is Contributing Editor for Age of Autism.

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Response to mainer (Reply #27)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 07:30 PM

31. The speed of the increase is too great to attribute solely to increased parental age, Zahorodny said

 

http://www.northjersey.com/news/183892061_N_J__autism_rate_soared_in_4_years.html?page=all&scpromo=1

<>

Autism is believed to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors, though research has not been able to tease out the exact origins. The startlingly fast rise in autism prevalence raises concerns about environmental factors that might be contributing to it, particularly during prenatal development and early infancy, Zahorodny said. The speed of the increase is too great to attribute solely to increased parental age, he said.

The research team at UMDNJ already has completed its review of 2010 data for the four New Jersey counties, and it will be published with the results of other monitoring studies around the country in about six months, Zahorodny said. The team has begun its analysis of 2012 data, which would cover children who are 8 years old this year.

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Response to proverbialwisdom (Original post)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 02:55 PM

28. Another article on father's age and rising autism rates

http://www.nature.com/news/fathers-bequeath-more-mutations-as-they-age-1.11247

The older the dad, the more genetic mutations

Men, yes you too have a biological clock!

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