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Sat Dec 15, 2012, 12:27 PM

 

On election's eve, Japan's conservatives appear poised for dramatic comeback

Source: Christian Science Monitor

Japan’s political carousel is about to revolve yet again. By late on Sunday evening, the world’s third biggest economy is expected to install its seventh prime minister in six years, with polls predicting a dramatic comeback by the conservative opposition and its hawkish leader, Shinzo Abe.

If the predictions are correct, Japan’s political landscape will have a familiar feel to it. Mr. Abe, who was chosen to lead the Liberal Democratic Party earlier this year, has already held the top job, for a year from September 2006.

Read more: http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Asia-Pacific/2012/1215/On-election-s-eve-Japan-s-conservatives-appear-poised-for-dramatic-comeback

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Reply On election's eve, Japan's conservatives appear poised for dramatic comeback (Original post)
michigandem58 Dec 2012 OP
louis-t Dec 2012 #1
leftlibdem420 Dec 2012 #2
JackRiddler Dec 2012 #3
Ken Burch Dec 2012 #4
brooklynite Dec 2012 #6
bananas Dec 2012 #5

Response to michigandem58 (Original post)

Sat Dec 15, 2012, 12:30 PM

1. There goes Japan.

When their economy crumbles, who will they blame?

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Response to louis-t (Reply #1)

Sat Dec 15, 2012, 01:56 PM

2. A bit of a misnomer...

 

The current "liberal" government has lots of dissident conservatives.

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Response to louis-t (Reply #1)

Sat Dec 15, 2012, 08:00 PM

3. Not how it works.

Economic - especially monetary - policy ain't going to change. It's been stable for 20+ years.

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Response to michigandem58 (Original post)

Sat Dec 15, 2012, 08:15 PM

4. This is what happens when you beat the right-wing by promising to be just barely NOT right-wing.

That always means you're going to keep doing the same bad things that got the right-wing party defeated, and they'll beat you next time because you did what they WOULD have done if you hadn't beaten them.

Conclusion:the only chance a non-right-wing party has of success is for that party to be completely different from the right-wing government the non-right-wing party turfed out.

Not rocket science.

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Response to Ken Burch (Reply #4)

Sun Dec 16, 2012, 11:34 PM

6. Just like the only was a conservative party can win is by running a REALLY CONSERVATIVE candidate?

I wonder if the Republicans have figured that out?

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Response to michigandem58 (Original post)

Sun Dec 16, 2012, 08:11 AM

5. Why Japan’s Right Turn Could Be Trouble for the U.S.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2012/12/16/why-japan-s-right-turn-could-be-trouble-for-the-u-s.html

Why Japan’s Right Turn Could Be Trouble for the U.S.

Dec 16, 2012 4:45 AM EST

A militaristic coalition is poised for gains in Sunday’s elections, behind right-wing former governor Shintaro Ishihara. Why America has much at stake with its closest Asian ally.

The Rising Sun may be making a comeback in Japan. Less than a century ago, this nationalist and militarist symbol flew over Imperialist Japan as it was invading countries all over Asia. It is now popularized by a militaristic political coalition that might win election on Sunday.

<snip>

Having just returned from Tokyo, I can tell you that many in the Japanese news media have expressed concern since the Nov. 17 announcement by Ishihara that his newly formed Sunrise Party (reminiscent of Japan’s Imperialist past) would merge forces with the Restoration Party, led by Toru Hashimoto, Osaka’s conservative mayor. Calls made by Ishihara for a “new military” are alarming to many Japanese, and the Chinese blogosphere has been fretful about it.

<snip>

Politicians like Ishihara (who just stepped down as governor of Tokyo to run for parliament) want to scuttle Japan’s pacifist constitution, remilitarize—including pursuing nuclear weapons—and take a more belligerent stance against China. These developments should be of grave concern for Americans because we have a security treaty with Japan promising to protect our ally.

<snip>

Kathryn Ibata-Arens serves on the bilateral U.S.-Japan Innovation and Entrepreneurship Council and is an associate professor at DePaul University in Chicago, where she teaches Asian business, politics, and economy.

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