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Sat Dec 8, 2012, 06:05 PM

Egypt crisis: President Morsi 'annuls' powers decree

Source: BBC News

Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi has annulled a decree he issued last month that hugely expanded his powers and sparked angry protests, officials say.

However, a news conference in Cairo was told that a referendum on a draft constitution would still go ahead as planned on 15 December.

Read more: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-20655412



Egypt: President Morsi 'Backs Down On Powers'

Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi has annulled a decree he issued last month expanding his powers, an official has said.

But a referendum on a draft constitution would still go ahead as planned on December 15, Islamist politician Selim al Awa added.

He explained that constitutionally Mr Morsi was unable to change the date, as Mr al Awa spoke to reporters after talks between the president and political leaders.

The decree and referendum were at the heart of anti-Morsi protests that have rocked Egypt in the past two weeks.

http://news.sky.com/story/1022778/egypt-president-morsi-backs-down-on-powers

19 replies, 3037 views

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Reply Egypt crisis: President Morsi 'annuls' powers decree (Original post)
dipsydoodle Dec 2012 OP
plethoro Dec 2012 #1
Lasher Dec 2012 #15
Tx4obama Dec 2012 #2
muriel_volestrangler Dec 2012 #3
Tx4obama Dec 2012 #4
allrevvedup Dec 2012 #5
allrevvedup Dec 2012 #6
allrevvedup Dec 2012 #7
allrevvedup Dec 2012 #10
Coyotl Dec 2012 #8
allrevvedup Dec 2012 #9
Coyotl Dec 2012 #11
triplepoint Dec 2012 #12
Dokkie Dec 2012 #13
allrevvedup Dec 2012 #17
pampango Dec 2012 #18
allrevvedup Dec 2012 #19
muriel_volestrangler Dec 2012 #14
allrevvedup Dec 2012 #16

Response to dipsydoodle (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 06:09 PM

1. That should make no difference. Morsi's got to go. He'll simply wait for

 

more power than re-enact the decree.

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Response to plethoro (Reply #1)

Sun Dec 9, 2012, 05:13 PM

15. Yes, that's the bottom line.

It's clear he has no respect for the principle of majority rule.

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Response to dipsydoodle (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 06:10 PM

2. More: Egyptian President Morsi wants opposition to suggest changes to draft constitution...


Breaking News ‏@BreakingNews

More: Egyptian President Morsi wants opposition to suggest changes to draft constitution, says national dialogue spokesman - @Reuters

https://twitter.com/BreakingNews/status/277539506767417344



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Response to dipsydoodle (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 07:44 PM

3. K&R (nt)

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Response to dipsydoodle (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 08:18 PM

4. Kick! n/t

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Response to dipsydoodle (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 08:29 PM

5. dballance asked in another thread (now locked), "What Was He Thinking?"

 

Here's what Morsi was thinking as far as I can tell:

a) He wanted to retry Mubarak and his security chiefs, as he feels they'd been too lightly punished, and

b) He wanted to prevent the Egyptian courts from abolishing what's left of the Egyptian legislature and the constitutional committee before the Constitution goes to the citizenry for ratification in the upcoming Dec. 15 referendum.

The actual decrees don't seem to have been nearly as "far reaching" as they're made out to be, and the current sturm und drang seem directly aimed at nuking the Egyptian Constitution before it's ratified, also at toppling Morsi, and either would be very bad for Egypt. Both are strongly supported by Obama incidentally.

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Response to dipsydoodle (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 09:01 PM

6. President Morsi agrees to delay referendum: Egyptian PM

 

Cairo, Dec 9 (IANS/RIA Novosti) Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi has agreed to delay the referendum on a new draft constitution and make amendments to his constitutional declaration, Prime Minister Hisham Qandil said Saturday.

"President Morsi and the country's political forces are discussing legal ways to delay the referendum. The president does not object to a postponement of the vote," Qandil said. . . .

"The country's political forces and the president, who gathered on Saturday to hold a national dialog, have agreed to establish a commission to amend the constitutional declaration," Qandil said.

Morsi's Nov 22 constitutional declaration expanded his executive authority by barring the courts from challenging his decisions. . . .

Opposition groups have been rallying against the constitutional declaration and Morsi's decision to hold a nationwide referendum on the new Constitution Dec 15, which they described as too hasty.

The postponement of the referendum is one of the Egyptian opposition's key demands.

http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/1/64/60092/Egypt/Politics-/Morsis-decree-cancelled,-constitution-referendum-t.aspx

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Response to allrevvedup (Reply #6)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 09:06 PM

7. So: now that they got what they said they wanted,

 

will the "protesters" go away? I'm willing to bet they don't stop grabbing headlines until Morsi is forced out and Egypt is once again reduced to chaos, which is right where its enemies want it.

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Response to allrevvedup (Reply #6)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 09:30 PM

10. Direct link to RIA Novosti report:

 

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Response to dipsydoodle (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 09:15 PM

8. New constitutional declaration to be issued within hours: Egypt PM

New constitutional declaration to be issued within hours: Egypt PM
Source: Ahram Online, Saturday 8 Dec 2012

Egypt Prime Minister Hisham Qandil stated Saturday that he expects President Mohamed Morsi to issue a new constitutional declaration “within hours” to put an end to the ongoing political turmoil, with mass demos staged to protest a previous declaration and the draft constitution.

“The forces that met at the presidential palace in the dialogue that President Morsi has called for agreed on forming a committee to draft the final constitutional declaration,” Qandil said in an interview with Mehwar TV.

“President Mohamed Morsi is keen to make this dialogue work and put an end to the current predicament. He accepts the option of making amendments to the constitutional declaration.”

Fierce protests broke out last week after Morsi issued a constitutional declaration ...


Read more: http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/1/64/60089/Egypt/Politics-/New-constitutional-declaration-to-be-issued-within.aspx


Full text of previous version here:

New Egypt Constitution - draft translated
http://www.democraticunderground.com/10021914955

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Response to Coyotl (Reply #8)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 09:28 PM

9. The latest from Al Ahram is that the Dec. 15 vote will go on as scheduled:

 

Note the Sunday byline:

Morsi's decree cancelled, constitution referendum to take place on time

Egypt President Mohamed Morsi revokes the controversial constitutional decleration he issued last month, but the constitution referendum will be held on 15 December as scheduled

Randa Ali and Hatem Maher, Sunday 9 Dec 2012

http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/1/64/60092/Egypt/Politics-/Morsis-decree-cancelled,-constitution-referendum-t.aspx


So at this point it's a little unclear what exactly the plan is. I guess we'll find out soon enough. My preference would be for full steam ahead and if Egyptians don't like it they can send it back to the committee.

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Response to allrevvedup (Reply #9)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 11:35 PM

11. Apparently, there will be some amending before the vote still, by consensus with opposition

I think the idea is to ensure the revolution ASAP, thus make some changes to satisfy a broader electorate.

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Response to dipsydoodle (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 11:45 PM

12. Is this Because We Threatened to Cut Them Off?

 

Last edited Mon Dec 10, 2012, 03:05 PM - Edit history (3)

Money talks...and Makes the World go around.....In for a penny, in for a pound!
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Morsi needs a surprise necktie party....REEEEEEEEEEEAL Sooooooooooooon!
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Response to triplepoint (Reply #12)

Sun Dec 9, 2012, 04:01 AM

13. Nonsense

 

Way to discredit the efforts and sacrifice of all those protesters. Yup, its the US cutting Egypt off that caused Morsi to reverse his power grab decree.

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Response to Dokkie (Reply #13)

Sun Dec 9, 2012, 06:44 PM

17. Obama has made a few calls to Morsi

 

expressing concern for the violence, so I imagine that was a factor in Morsi's conciliatory gesture last night. But I wouldn't ascribe noble motives to the "protesters," who by all appearances are the same crew of intel operatives, mercenaries and local extras hired by the day as regularly appear in televised color revolutions. To the degree that their motives are coherent, their intent is to interfere with the national referendum on Dec. 15, and thus is anti-democratic and despotic, and we're supposed to admire democracy, not despotism.

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Response to allrevvedup (Reply #17)

Sun Dec 9, 2012, 07:37 PM

18. So demonstrators are "intel operatives, mercenaries and local extras"?

That sounds like the conservative take on peace protesters or civil rights demonstrators in the US in decades gone by. According to conservatives our protesters were never there because they believed in the cause; rather they just wanted to cause trouble, burn things down or otherwise make a nuisance of themselves.

Is it not possible that there are liberal and secular demonstrators who do not want to see a new constitution rushed through that places limits on protests/free speech and the rights of women? I think the liberals in Egypt believe that Morsi is hurrying this process to take advantage of the (perhaps temporary) political advantage that the Muslim Brotherhood enjoys.

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Response to pampango (Reply #18)

Sun Dec 9, 2012, 07:42 PM

19. I didn't say they were doing it for kicks.

 

Google Operation Ajax if you think I'm kidding. That was 1953 and very litlle has changed but the communications technology and that only superficially.

As for liberal and secular demonstrators, yes there are always a few I suppose, but they're usually not the ones reciting threadbare talking points into the camera (or blogosphere) in perfect Thames English.

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Response to dipsydoodle (Original post)

Sun Dec 9, 2012, 05:05 PM

14. Egypt crisis: Opposition shuns Morsi move

Opposition leaders rejected the move and called for protests on Tuesday. Later, Islamist groups said they would hold counter demonstrations.

The president's critics accuse him of acting like a dictator, but he says he is safeguarding the revolution.

In a statement after talks on Sunday, the opposition National Salvation Front said it would not recognise the draft constitution "because it does not represent the Egyptian people".

"We reject the referendum which will certainly lead to more division and sedition," spokesman Sameh Ashour said at a news conference.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-20659233


The army has built a 10 foot tall concrete barricade around the presidential palace.

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Response to muriel_volestrangler (Reply #14)

Sun Dec 9, 2012, 06:32 PM

16. Regarding that 10-foot wall: Can you blame them?

 

Clearly someone doesn't want this Constitution ratified on Dec. 15, and it's not the Egyptian majority, who haven't had a chance to vote on it, and won't, if this week's rent-a-rebels manage to gum up the works.

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