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Sat Dec 8, 2012, 02:58 AM

Australian DJs royal prank broke no laws, says CEO

Source: the guardian

The CEO of the Australian radio station responsible for the prank call to the hospital treating the Duchess of Cambridge has described the suspected suicide of the nurse who took the call as "tragic", but said he is satisfied the presenters have broken no laws.

Rhys Holleran, head of the Austereo network, which owns the radio station 2Day FM, said on Saturday the presenters could not have "reasonably foreseen" the events which unfolded.

"We are very confident that we haven't done anything illegal. We are satisfied that the procedures we have in place have been met," he said.

"Our main concern at this point in time is that what has happened is deeply tragic and we are incredibly saddened and we are incredibly affected by that."

Read more: http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2012/dec/08/royal-hoax-call-australian-presenters-law



Consider the source, who's got money to be made off those sleazeball radio hosts. Of course he will say no laws were broken.

14 replies, 3084 views

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Reply Australian DJs royal prank broke no laws, says CEO (Original post)
alp227 Dec 2012 OP
intaglio Dec 2012 #1
muriel_volestrangler Dec 2012 #2
Judi Lynn Dec 2012 #3
FloridaJudy Dec 2012 #4
LeftofObama Dec 2012 #5
renate Dec 2012 #10
ForgoTheConsequence Dec 2012 #12
LiveNudePolitics Dec 2012 #6
Beaverhausen Dec 2012 #7
FloridaJudy Dec 2012 #9
Kelvin Mace Dec 2012 #8
trouble.smith Dec 2012 #11
fascisthunter Dec 2012 #13
Matilda Dec 2012 #14

Response to alp227 (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 04:26 AM

1. Not illegal and this sort of dick does not believe in morals

I really hope people start to boycott his stations

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Response to alp227 (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 04:50 AM

2. It looks like they broke Australian broadcasting rules

Now that I have, I hear that the call breaks the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) Commercial Radio Code of Practice ( September 2011) which states:

“A licensee must not broadcast the words of an identifiable person unless:

a) That person has been informed in advance or a reasonable person would be aware that the words may be broadcast

b) In the case of words which have been recorded without the knowledge of that person, that person has subsequently, but prior to the broadcast, expressed consent to the broadcast of their words.”

http://thehoopla.com.au/radio-prank-calls-rules/


They might try to weasel out of it by saying the nurses were not identified by name; though it would be clear to anyone who knew which nurses were on duty that night who they were.

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Response to alp227 (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 05:00 AM

3. Australians blast Sydney radio station for prank London call

Australians blast Sydney radio station for prank London call
By Sid Astbury / dpa (MCT)
Saturday, December 8, 2012 - Added 2 hours ago

SYDNEY — Australia’s leading advertisers Saturday fled the Sydney radio station whose prank call to a London hospital asking about the health of the Duchess of Cambridge also has been connected to the death of a nurse.

Jacintha Saldanha, who transferred the call from 2Day FM to a duty nurse, was found dead Friday, as police said there was no evidence of foul play.

Supermarket chain Coles pulled its advertising, saying in a statement that “Australians are clearly angry and upset by what appear to be tragic consequences of the 2Day FM UK hospital prank.”

More than seven hours after the death of the 46-year-old mother of two, the station’s website was still playing footage celebrating what it claimed was the “Biggest Royal Prank Ever.”

More:
http://www.bostonherald.com/news/international/asia_pacific/view/20121208australians_blast_sydney_radio_station_for_prank_london_call/

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Response to alp227 (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 06:38 AM

4. I hope these jerks lose their shirts

The kind of prank calls that DJs make have never struck me as funny. They always seem to involve mocking or harassing some poor working slob who's not in a position to fight back - the Chinese waitress, the pizza delivery guy, and yes, the nurse who's probably dead on her feet after a tough shift. Why are we surprised that children act like bullies when we reward people who do for laughs?

Now if they'd pranked Donald Trump or Rupert Murdock, that shit would be funny as hell. Not only are they rich and powerful, but they themselves have made careers out of bullying.

I read that sleazy pair have received hundreds of death threats. I don't approve of that, but I would love to see them sued down to their knickers. And never get another job in broadcasting ever again.

Maybe they'd have to take a job in a Chinese restaurant and listen to some clown call in an order of sweet and sour cat, with a side of "Flied Lice" (Yes, I once heard a DJ do just that. It was not only cruel, but racist).

Edited to add: besides, what sort of assholes decide that it's funny to mock a woman puking her guts out with morning sickness, no matter how blue her blood?

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Response to FloridaJudy (Reply #4)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 07:13 AM

5. I agree with everything you just said!

These prank calls by radio DJ's are rarely if ever funny.

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Response to FloridaJudy (Reply #4)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 03:41 PM

10. pranks and practical jokes are just plain mean

Someone playing a practical joke--i.e., the person who is fully aware and informed that what's happening is a joke--is in a position of power over the person who isn't aware it's a joke. That's bullying. I can't understand people who play practical jokes on friends and family, although as long as there's an opportunity for payback, and if the relationships are affectionate, I guess it's not the same kind of power. But these guys with a national radio audience... it's bullying.

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Response to renate (Reply #10)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 11:00 PM

12. The irony.

Colbert is known for his elaborate pranks. My friends and I play pranks and jokes on each other all the time. I couldn't imagine being friends with them if they were so completely uptight.

This situation is unfortunate but lets not get carried away.

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Response to alp227 (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 12:13 PM

6. The Legality of these pranks

is of no importance to me. Society is rife with bullies, who for the most part are kids with out the vision to think their actions through. We all say we want less of this behavior in our society. Yet, we have hugely popular shows with this kind of prank, and others even more dangerous and mean spirited offered as entertainment. When adults engage in behavior without regard to consequences to such behavior, then sometimes the results are really tragic. I want to see the right thing done here. The two pranksters need to admit that this sort of crap can go really wrong, they should not have made the call, and make a huge payment to the care of that poor woman's children.

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Response to alp227 (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 12:15 PM

7. It's not illegal to call a hospital and claim you are someone you are not to get information?

Well, it should be. At the least the DJs should be fired.

What is with the prank calls? How immature can they be?

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Response to Beaverhausen (Reply #7)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 02:56 PM

9. It is here in the US

Under the HIPPA regulations - you can be charged with a Federal crime.There are very strict rules on to whom hospitals and medical providers can release medical information without the patient's explicit written consent. I'm a retired Nurse-Practitioner, so I know this well.

In the UK? I haven't the foggiest notion.

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Response to alp227 (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 02:10 PM

8. This is a conservative refrain I hear all the time

As long as it is legal there is no problem.

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Response to alp227 (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 10:23 PM

11. committing fraud in order to obtain protected information is legal in Europe/Australia?

 

ignoring for a second that they ruined a random person's life for fun and caused her to kill herself.

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Response to alp227 (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 11:14 PM

13. no, but they are still amoral scumbags

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Response to fascisthunter (Reply #13)

Sun Dec 9, 2012, 08:33 PM

14. I think that's wishfull thinking on the part of the CEO.

Other radio personnel have said that it's illegal to broadcast a private interview without informing the other part and getting their permission to broadcast, and some lawyers have supported this. I wouldn't expect that it would attract more than a heavy fine, though, and perhaps ACMA (Aust. Communictions and Media Authority) will set strict guidelines for the station from now on, as they have done with certain shock jocks. And maybe the two idiots who pulled this stupid stunt will lose their jobs, and I'm sure it will be no loss.

I am surprised, though, that the hospital doesn't seem to have laid down strict protocols, given that royals have been hospitalised there over the past seventy years. There must be others (such as the Murdoch press) who would have tried to get information about royals admitted there, and any such calls should be put through to a senior management person for vetting.

The Queen wouldn't just pick up the phone and make such a call - an aide would do it for her. Neither would she ever refer to Kate by name, but she would also use her title, the Duchess of Cambridge. If this Aussie knows this, Brits should certainly be aware. And in fact, any info she wanted would doubtless be given her by William, so alarm bells should have rung with the nurse on duty (who wasn't the one who committed suicide). The staff should all be aware of things like this, so they could never be caught out by such a trick again. Probably it was night-time in London, and perhaps the staff concerned were tired and not thinking clearly, so all the more reason to have a strict protocol in place for them to follow.

Edit to add: The relevant act is The Surveillance Devices Act.

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