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Sat Nov 24, 2012, 11:23 PM

Some states preserve penmanship despite tech gains

Source: Associated Press

LOS ANGELES (AP) ó The pen may not be as mighty as the keyboard these days, but California and a handful of states are not giving up on handwriting entirely.
Bucking a growing trend of eliminating cursive from elementary school curriculums or making it optional, California is among the states keeping longhand as a third-grade staple.
The state's posture on penmanship is not likely to undercut its place at the leading edge of technology, but it has teachers and students divided over the value of learning flowing script and looping signatures in an age of touchpads and mobile devices.

Read more: http://news.yahoo.com/states-preserve-penmanship-despite-tech-gains-190737500.html

64 replies, 6795 views

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Arrow 64 replies Author Time Post
Reply Some states preserve penmanship despite tech gains (Original post)
pstokely Nov 2012 OP
Liberal_in_LA Nov 2012 #1
Crowman1979 Nov 2012 #2
Hestia Nov 2012 #3
sakabatou Nov 2012 #4
Lilma Nov 2012 #5
sigmasix Nov 2012 #6
hrmjustin Nov 2012 #7
Le Taz Hot Nov 2012 #8
HockeyMom Nov 2012 #25
Orrex Nov 2012 #9
ashling Nov 2012 #10
Orrex Nov 2012 #11
Igel Nov 2012 #38
Orrex Nov 2012 #46
obamanut2012 Nov 2012 #56
Socal31 Nov 2012 #12
surrealAmerican Nov 2012 #29
Tikki Nov 2012 #13
mkrayburn Nov 2012 #14
ThoughtCriminal Nov 2012 #16
valerief Nov 2012 #20
ThoughtCriminal Nov 2012 #42
valerief Nov 2012 #44
ThoughtCriminal Nov 2012 #47
valerief Nov 2012 #48
Tikki Nov 2012 #17
Quantess Nov 2012 #23
hrmjustin Nov 2012 #40
obamanut2012 Nov 2012 #57
David__77 Nov 2012 #15
snot Nov 2012 #18
MickeyFinne Nov 2012 #19
TM99 Nov 2012 #21
obamanut2012 Nov 2012 #58
MickeyFinne Nov 2012 #64
Quantess Nov 2012 #22
Chef Eric Nov 2012 #24
Bluenorthwest Nov 2012 #26
Quantess Nov 2012 #28
Ineeda Nov 2012 #31
Quantess Nov 2012 #32
Ineeda Nov 2012 #60
Orrex Nov 2012 #61
Quantess Nov 2012 #30
obamanut2012 Nov 2012 #59
HockeyMom Nov 2012 #27
lbrtbell Nov 2012 #33
Thor_MN Nov 2012 #34
Quantess Nov 2012 #35
Igel Nov 2012 #39
Quantess Nov 2012 #41
Thor_MN Nov 2012 #49
obamanut2012 Nov 2012 #55
TahitiNut Nov 2012 #36
slackmaster Nov 2012 #37
pnwmom Nov 2012 #43
Thor_MN Nov 2012 #50
demilib Nov 2012 #53
mkrayburn Nov 2012 #45
Paula Sims Nov 2012 #51
Paula Sims Nov 2012 #52
Orrex Nov 2012 #62
obamanut2012 Nov 2012 #54
treestar Nov 2012 #63

Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 11:27 PM

1. good

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 11:28 PM

2. It's always best to learn how past methods worked, in order to have a backup.

Otherwise, if the (desktop/laptop/tablet/smartphone) breaks, then you're gonna be running around like a chicken with your head cut off.

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 11:34 PM

3. Wasn't there a report on the new ACT requiring a cursive essay with cursive signature?

If so, cursive will have to be taught, and one year isn't enough.

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 11:47 PM

4. I pretty much only use it these days for formal stuff and signatures

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 12:01 AM

5. I used to love to write

until MS struck and my handwriting skills took a dive. I had to relearn to write left handed. It isn't a pretty site now. Sometimes I cant read my own writing. I do think all children should learn to write cursive.

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 12:11 AM

6. I was just talking about this...

The demise of formal cursive is a signal of further problems to come. There is the new voice recognition software making headway in our education industry as well. The technology may very well make humans illiterate within a few generations. We need to teach a realistic respect for having a command of the English language. (or whatever language your culture is using)
When an individual must master the formal lexicon to acquire the attention/positive rewards given to the originator of a new idea within an information-based culture, they are exposed to the history of the language; thereby exposing them to many ideas and concepts that are included in more complete knowledge base of any well informed electorate or leader of people.
Being able to write in a coherent, formal way enables the writer to order his/her thoughts and discipline the cognitive tools needed to acquire and correlate knowledge and new ideas.
Meanwhile, I'm seriously thinking about giving my children book report assignments at home. They get straight A's but never bring home any homework.

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 12:13 AM

7. I always write in script.

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 12:18 AM

8. I write in script when I don't want

younger people to know what I'm writing. When I really want to confuse them, I use shorthand.

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Response to Le Taz Hot (Reply #8)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 07:28 AM

25. I used shorthand to take notes (verbatim)

in law class about 10 years ago. The professor said no recorders were allowed in class. So I got out my steno pad and took dictation. Some of the youngsters complained that I was cheating, but the attorney just smiled and told them no ELECTRONIC recordings. lol Then they all wanted MY transcribed notes from class!

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 12:32 AM

9. Other than my signature, I haven't written three words in cursive in over 20 years

I can see using cursive by personal preference, but otherwise what's the point?

Why don't we teach Carolingian Miniscule while we're at it?

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Response to Orrex (Reply #9)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 12:59 AM

10. I think that is an excellent idea.

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Response to ashling (Reply #10)


Response to Orrex (Reply #9)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 11:52 AM

38. I take notes when I read.

Cursive's the way to go. Faster.

Sure, I could take notes on computer. But it's awfully difficult to put in a graph or sketch followed by a series of equations, and then go back and properly label the graph based upon the equations and analysis.

Always fun in the fall to see the kids with their new computers in class run across the problems inherent in keyboarding science notes.

Also provides a nice way to distinguish between letters in various styles and formats in equations.


But there's a bigger point here. A lot of students, by the time they get to my class (HS juniors), have still failed to appreciate that how things are on the page matters. They don't make a distinction between on the line, above the line and below the line, they don't distinguish capitals and minuscules. Then, suddenly, the distinction is crucial. They write exponents on the line, they confuse subscripts with independent variables, they confuse lower and upper case letters, and then they can't understand why when they plug numbers into an equation they get the wrong answer.

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Response to Igel (Reply #38)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 02:54 PM

46. I didn't take a single cursive note in my entire college career

Wouldn't have helped in the slightest and would very likely have hindered me.

I accept that cursive is faster for some people, but it isn't for me hand never has been. Further, I'm a southpaw with terrible handwriting despite decades of effort; cursive writing was always a brutal chore with no discernable benefit to date. A single course in effective note-taking would be of far greater benefit IMO than the years of cursive writing instruction that I endured.

But there's a bigger point here. A lot of students, by the time they get to my class (HS juniors), have still failed to appreciate that how things are on the page matters. They don't make a distinction between on the line, above the line and below the line, they don't distinguish capitals and minuscules. Then, suddenly, the distinction is crucial. They write exponents on the line, they confuse subscripts with independent variables, they confuse lower and upper case letters, and then they can't understand why when they plug numbers into an equation they get the wrong answer.
I don't doubt that any of that is true as you describe, but I don't see how learning cursive would do anything to mitigate it. There are other (and IMO better) ways to teach the importance of page layout that don't involve obsolete writing formats.

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Response to Igel (Reply #38)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 06:38 PM

56. I print faster

And, the college kids I teach tend to print everything -- very quickly.

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 01:10 AM

12. I actually have to have my assistant fill out forms at my work because nobody can read mine....

They don't pass Quality Control.

I am thankful for computers, that is for sure!

On a side note, does anyone know of a study as to why females are generally "better" at penmanship?

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Response to Socal31 (Reply #12)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 08:10 AM

29. It probably has to do with the age at which children are taught to write.

Girls generally develop small motor skills at an earlier age than boys. If your writing isn't getting any neater during first or second grade, you may just settle for minimally legible.

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 01:35 AM

13. Excellent....

I take pride in my cursive and I hope my grandchildren will also take pride in their writing.


Tikki

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Response to pstokely (Original post)


Response to mkrayburn (Reply #14)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 02:24 AM

16. You could probably accomplish the same thing by teaching them Klingon

If I had learned Klingon in the 3rd grade instead of cursive writing, I would have found more use for it.

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Response to ThoughtCriminal (Reply #16)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 05:33 AM

20. Klingon is a script? I always thought it was a language. nt

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Response to valerief (Reply #20)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 01:04 PM

42. Both

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Response to ThoughtCriminal (Reply #42)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 01:15 PM

44. Oy, I think I need new reading glasses.

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Response to valerief (Reply #44)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 03:06 PM

47. One thing I notice about Klingon fonts

If you cut them out of a sheet of metal, every character can be used as a weapon.

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Response to ThoughtCriminal (Reply #47)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 04:23 PM

48. And the metal sheet can be used as a stencil! nt

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Response to mkrayburn (Reply #14)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 02:33 AM

17. HI...mkrayburn ....WELCOME..to DU



You are absolutely correct. Personally, I believe it helps in word spelling learning
and retention.

I'm glad you found your way here to DU. Hope to read more of your posts.


Tikki

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Response to mkrayburn (Reply #14)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 06:51 AM

23. I can sort of see your point, except,

cursive writing (as teachers nagged us to use) is not faster. I write fast and legibly, and I connect some letters, however, I would get an F if some naggy grade school handwriting teacher were grading me on handwriting. I despise unnecessary loops.

Welcome to DU!

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Response to mkrayburn (Reply #14)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 12:17 PM

40. Welcome to DU!

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Response to mkrayburn (Reply #14)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 06:39 PM

57. There are plenty of other things that can be taught

For this and hand-eye coordination. Classroom time is precious in the US, and spending so much time on something not needed is ridiculous.

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 02:04 AM

15. I never use cursive script

I haven't since I was in junior high. It seems so antiquated.

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 02:36 AM

18. I'm not sure cursive per se matters; but I process info better when I write it out

than when I type it -- a lot better. So I think there's something worthwhile about making kids write stuff out.

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 03:24 AM

19. Shocked and saddened by responses!

Wow. All I can really say is WOW! I am shocked by the common response here: Why teach cursive. I haven't used it in years so it is useless. Hmmmm. Looking back at my schooling, I've really not used my German (I took four years in high school and it was one of my majors at the university). I've also not used the Latin I took at the university. Nor have I used the chemistry or biology or physics I took. Well, I really haven't used much if any of the medieval studies I took. I definitely haven't used the calculus I took or for that matter the geometry. I do use basic math but rarely use algebra even. So, I guess I really didn't need any of those classes. Throw history in there as well and my ethics class. I don't use it either. Or logic...OR, OR, OR. Heck. Why even keep reading, With screen reading technology, everything can be read to us. No need for it. Plus we could take the time spent learning to read and learn how to use the doo-dad dingymaflopchic.

To claim that something isn't useful because it doesn't have an obvious daily use is a patently absurd argument. I'm proud of California for keeping the cursive. STEM education may well be important in a pragmatic way, but as I see it being focused on, I also see a corresponding loss of basic communication and interpersonal skills in my employees and the people we serve on a daily basis. I see increased spelling errors, a shortened attention span, and the general inability to think critically and creatively. It isn't all the fault of not learning cursive, but this lack is a response to modern education.

Plus (and here is the feel-goody side of things), how will our children ever be able to read that shoe-box full of love letters that grandpa sent to grandma? How will they ever read much of history, much of it written in cursive (it was also a sad day when Germany did away with learning the old script in the early 20th Century--generations since find it impossible to read old letters)? Sure, they can read it in "translation", but as those who have truly studied languages know, translation is not the same. The subtlety and curvature of the personally penned letter reveals much about the writer that computer/typewritten letters cannot.

Blech. My children will be learning cursive. And they'll do so in the home-schooled environment (now you can flame away!!!) where the subtleties of history are explored alongside learning computer programming skills and the hard sciences.

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Response to MickeyFinne (Reply #19)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 06:03 AM

21. Idiocracy anyone?

Why don't we just throw out everything that might not be useful practically for a job skill in the future?

So, yes, I totally agree with what you just wrote. I love technology. I work with it daily. I took typing in high school and that has served me well to this day. And, I still write daily in various journals. Cognitively I do process things differently. Some of these journals are like dairies, collecting my experiences and nightly dreams. Others are for song writing and technology. Yes, I still jot down musical notation by hand when I compose. Yes, I actually do algebra in notebooks as I calculate impedance on a circuit I am designing.

I don't have children, however, if I did I would make sure they still learned cursive writing whether in a home-school environment or in an afternoon activity away from the public school.

No flaming here as I applaud you and encourage you to do just as you say you will with your children.

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Response to MickeyFinne (Reply #19)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 06:41 PM

58. There is no reason for kids to learn cursive in 2012

None.

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Response to obamanut2012 (Reply #58)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 09:12 PM

64. Wrong again, Batman...

Funny. You are so sure of yourself. No. None. Wow.

"Putting actual pen to paper can have significant benefits for brain development, the Los Angeles Times reports. Recent research has found that when students develop their handwriting, they also increase their brain activity and improve their fine motor skills. Similar benefits were not detected when kids were typing or simply repeating their lessons verbally.

Scientists compared the neuroimage scans of preschoolers who were practicing printing as they were learning their letters and those who were just doing verbal repetition.

After four weeks of training, the kids who practiced writing showed brain activation similar to an adultís, said James, the studyís lead researcher. The printing practice also improved letter recognition, which is the No. 1 predictor of reading ability at age 5."

From: http://www.educationnews.org/technology/research-handwriting-spurs-brain-activity-typing-doesnt/

Perhaps not the best source (there are many better sources and actual studies out there). Take a look at the research, educate yourself, and then we'll talk.

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 06:45 AM

22. I have a personal grudge against being nagged to writie in cursive.

Teachers spent so much time nagging us and critiquing our silly loops, which in my opinion, was time that could have been better spent on learning something else. Besides, cursive writing is hard to read and does not actually look pretty, either. I support eliminating it, or at least placing less emphasis on cursive writing.

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Response to Quantess (Reply #22)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 07:25 AM

24. Do you also have a personal grudge against using spell check? nt

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Response to Quantess (Reply #22)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 07:31 AM

26. So you were not good at it, thus it should not be taught? Absurd.

Also, the same argument I used against physical education. The kid next to me wanted history elimitated, 'cause he sucked at it....do you see a trend?

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Response to Bluenorthwest (Reply #26)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 08:09 AM

28. No. I was good at cursive.

I have very good penmanship. My annoyance with spending hours of classroom time forming cursive letters has nothing to do with my success at writing in cursive. I did not like the style even back then, and I did not appreciate having to conform to the cursive style. I don't like the way it looks.

Edit to add: I remember seeing respected adults with their own unique, legible, mature looking handwriting, and I was very aware that nobody nagged them for not adding extra loops. Maybe my resentment for being nagged to conform to the cursive style had more to do with my boredom with it. I had matured beyond the confinement of cursive writing, and I felt that it was time to let me develop my own style.

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Response to Quantess (Reply #28)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 08:28 AM

31. And yet many other people enjoy learning it, doing it and how it looks.

Your being bored with something doesn't necessarily diminish the value of it for others.

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Response to Ineeda (Reply #31)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 08:48 AM

32. I respect that, but it was a huge waste of time for me.

I would bet there are other students who had excellent fine motor control who, like me, wished we could just move on already.
I have resentment for the lesson time spent practicing cursive. I could write in cursive just fine, but I really disliked it, and I resented having to add extra loops and connect every single letter, when my style was actually more legible. Cursive "r" is often difficult to read. Also, what is the deal with cursive "Q" that looks like a 2? My list of complaints go on and on.

Teaching good penmanship absolutely should be taught in school, but I fail to see the importance of preserving the pedantic cursive style, if it means devoting a lot of class time to it.

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Response to Quantess (Reply #32)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 06:44 PM

60. No, you do not 'respect' that....

Your words: I support eliminating it, or at least placing less emphasis on cursive writing.
In other words, your opinion matters more than others'.

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Response to Ineeda (Reply #31)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 07:10 PM

61. Nor does your enjoyment of increase its utility for others

Write if you enjoy it. Teach it to your kids if you wish. But other than a personal aesthetic preference, I've read nothing here that approaches a compelling reason to continue to teach it at the institutional level.

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Response to Bluenorthwest (Reply #26)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 08:24 AM

30. I was really bored by cursive handwriting lesson time.

I was probably the best in the class at forming letters, actually. I thought it was a huge waste of time.

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Response to Quantess (Reply #22)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 06:42 PM

59. Like the stupid capital Q

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 07:35 AM

27. My daughter doesn't have a computer in Basic Training

They are allowed to WRITE letters. If they don't know how to write, what are they supposed to do? I certainly can use my own computer, print it, and send it to her, but that is very cold and impersonal. She is 28 and learned cursive in school so we can both read each other's writing.

Not to get OT here, but after Sandy hit and all the power went out, including Cell Phone TOWERS, my daughter's LAND LINE phone still worked.

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 08:59 AM

33. To those who "never" use cursive

Do you print your sympathy cards? Or e-mail flash animations to people who have just lost a loved one? Anything other than cursive in such a case is just tacky, unless you're under 8 years old.

And how are people supposed to develop a signature without learning cursive? Print their names to sign things? While we're at it, let's forget about signatures completely, and just sign things with an X, as illiterate people did in old cartoons.

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Response to lbrtbell (Reply #33)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 10:10 AM

34. Is there only one font on a computer? Cursive is ONE font.

Forcing a child into just one way of writing is more of a lesson in conformity. I find the implied message that there is but a single way to write very limiting. The situations in the real word where there is only one correct answer are a small minority.

Capital cursive Zs and Qs are ridiculous, they look nothing like the vast majority of fonts. Lower case r is more inferred from context than its shape. I find myself using synonyms to avoid having to write Zs and Qs.

I do use cursive when writing out a card, but that is the one place I use it.

Did you really mean to imply that the way a message is written is more important than the message itself? That there is only one proper font for handwriting?

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Response to Thor_MN (Reply #34)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 10:38 AM

35. Yes, thank you!

You have articulated my point of view better than I have.

The knee-jerk reaction seems to be that you are either in favor of teaching cursive or you are in favor of letting students have poor handwriting. That is not the point at all. Of course good penmanship should be emphasized.

My resentment for cursive stems from the imposed conformity to a font that is really not that attractive or legible. Not only that, but all the countless hours I spent practicing something I was able to do well, and was ready to move on, but had no choice but to sit there along with the rest of the class and draw a bunch of stupid, loopy, Qs and Zs and Ss.

I much prefer my own handwriting that I have developed, which is a combination of print letters and connected letters, for efficiency. My handwriting is also legible, which is the most important part. There is no way I would ever willingly write in the grade-school cursive font, at this point in my life. I gave it up as soon as my teachers stopped demanding conformity to the cursive font.

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Response to Thor_MN (Reply #34)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 12:04 PM

39. Sometimes the "how" is more important than the "what".

I can knock out a letter at a hundred words a minute.

That 30 word sympathy card on 8.5 x 11" 20 lb stock takes 40 seconds of sympathy. That's if I take the time to pull down a menu of fonts and typefaces and pick a flowery one to show the true depth of my sympathy.

"My thoughts are with you"--for these 40 seconds. Then I'm off to doing something I find useful. Even better to send a text or email, then I have a few seconds more in which I don't have to think about the other person and can focus on the true source of splendor in the universe, myself and my interests.


No, there's no more a single font for handwriting than there is a single font for laser print. I don't like being limited either way. I can print, all caps or mixed. I can write in cursive neatly. I can write in cursive formally. I pick and choose by context. (And by language.)


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Response to Igel (Reply #39)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 12:18 PM

41. That would be nice if schools taught a variety of font styles,

so that students like me who mastered cursive easily and yet still hated it could move on to different styles. If that had been the case, maybe I wouldn't feel so resentful about all the time I wasted sitting there practicing cursive. How about teaching typing? Typing really should be a requirement in junior high, or younger. Maybe it is, nowadays. I had to wait until high school until it was offered.

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Response to Igel (Reply #39)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 04:52 PM

49. My intent was to demonstrate that there should be no single correct way to write

Personally, I don't do cards on a computer. I intended to use computer fonts to illustrate that point. What I didn't appreciate about learning cursive was the stupidity of being told that I should make a loopy number 2 when I wanted to convey the meaning of Q. And that I was wrong if I wrote something that actually looked like a Q.

In my opinion, the fact that someone thought enough to send a card, and the words that they wrote mean vastly more than than how they are written. I will never denigrate someone for printing a card or using a computer. If one spent an hour to do two lines on a card calligraphically, I would think that it is pretty, but a waste of time. It is an exercise in vanity to spend more time in showing how nice one writes than considering what one writes.

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Response to lbrtbell (Reply #33)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 06:36 PM

55. Printing is fine for a sgnature

There is no reason, nor law, for it to be in script. An X is okay. People are still illiterate and still do that, you now.

There's nothing wrong with printing anything.

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 10:59 AM

36. Whatever goes around, comes around.

I was the only male in my high school typing class. It sure came in handy in IT/MIS ... I was a whiz on the keypunch machine. At the same time, due to my mother's diligence when I was in elementary school, my longhand is excellent. Folks have often said "It looks like a girl's handwriting!" (I sometimes complain and say "woman's.")

I've had to go back to practicing. It seems the ONLY damage I suffered from my strokes four years ago is in right-side fine motor skills ... handwriting and throwing a frisbee. Getting back to "normal."

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 11:08 AM

37. My mom has beautiful handwriting. She recently bought a Livescribe pen.

 

Interesting gadget.

http://www.livescribe.com/int/

My handwriting is and has always been terrible.

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 01:12 PM

43. If you don't learn to write cursive, will you know how to read cursive?

There are also hand-brain connections made with cursive that don't occur with typing.

We might not ever know what we lost with this transition, but I can't help but think it will be a loss.

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Response to pnwmom (Reply #43)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 05:20 PM

50. If one never writes Times New Roman, Arial, Comic Sans, etc...

We learn to read before we learn to write. We can read fonts we have never seen before, cursive is a bit harder than most fonts, but for a literate adult, it would take mere minutes to adapt, having never seen cursive before. Until the language changes significantly enough, the form of writing is a minor impediment to comprehension. In fcat, msot polpe can raed tihngs as lnog as the frsit and lsat ltertes are in pacle. How many seconds does it take one to realize that the Bill of Rights was not written by Congefs of the US, but by Congress?

Is it a loss that most people can not read hieroglyphs, hieratic, cuneiform? Other than romantic attachment to bygone times, it really doesn't hold most people back in any significant measure. Complete loss of any means of writing language would be catastrophic, transformation to a different manner of writing is just change in progress.

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Response to pnwmom (Reply #43)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 06:28 PM

53. I learned about this development about a month ago. I was shocked.

A middle school student in my church was assigned to read anouncements that Sunday. She had a very difficult time reading them. It was only when one of the ministers, who is also a elementary school principal stood up and said that they no longer taught cursive writing in the school, that I discovered this. Apparently a lot of the announcements was in cursive.
I would probably dislike cursive writing too since my writing never got out of the chicken-scratch phase meanwhile my best friend's signatures looked like "cursive caligraphy" if there was such a word.

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Response to pstokely (Original post)


Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 05:47 PM

51. Handwriting is SO much more than putting pen/pencil to paper.

It's about hand/eye coordination, mental development, personality development. Forensic graphology is an accepted science. In my place of employment I actually TEACH (or, rather, re-teach) people how to write because now they're more apt to add "handwritten touches" to their memos than just shoot them off in an e-mail. It's the "personal touch". That's in addition to my daily job as a cryptologist/cryptographer.

Yes, some think I'm crazy, but I just paid $5,000 for a 1920's original Parker ivory & gold DuoFold. AM I crazy? Probably, but I can afford it (pens are my down-fall and especially original fountain pens) and I'm just in awe thinking of who could have used it and what it could have been used to write. There's a "soul" in pen, pencils, and paper and I can't get enough of it. Although I personally use the Getty-Dubey method (http://www.handwritingsuccess.com/), I have been known to switch to Palmer or even Spencerian if I "feel" like it. And I have been known to use crayons & coloring books to get back to my "inner child" and de-stress.

Getting back to the developmental part, check out this article http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2011-06-15/health/sc-health-0615-child-health-handwriti20110615_1_handwriting-virginia-berninger-brain-activation

And finally, it was because of a handwriting/calligraphy class in Reed College that got Steve Jobs thinking about the simplicity of what a computer could be. http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/steve-jobs-death-apple-calligraphy-248900 It is also at Reed College that other developments came from their calligraphy classes. http://www.reed.edu/calligraphy/history.html

I understand the importance of a computer -- heck, I used to program on paper tape and I've been building my own computers since 1990. But there is a need to re-emphasize the 3R's (reading, 'riting, 'rithmatic) because our children aren't being taught how to think -- only mimic. And I've seen it in today's doctors as well as co-workers, and THAT has me scared for the future of this country.

Paula


PS I still have my cell phone from the mid 2000s, a clam-shell and it works just fine. I don't have it on constantly, I don't know the number, I use it only to call my husband to tell him the train is running late, and I have no idea how to text except when it comes to printing by hand!

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 05:50 PM

52. Also, WHICH cursive method?

The current method of Zaner-Bloser or D'Nealian are clunky, Spencerian doesn't adapt to today's pens, Palmer is probably the "classic". However, there are many many more!

http://www.drawyourworld.com/blog/examples-of-handwriting-styles.html

Paula

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Response to Paula Sims (Reply #52)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 07:15 PM

62. Obviously, we need to teach all of them

Or else kids won't be able to read any of them.

Won't someone think of the children?

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 06:35 PM

54. Waste of teaching time and resources

There really is zero reason to learn script now. Actually, since I didn't use quill pens, I had no reason to learn it, either.

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Response to pstokely (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 08:04 PM

63. Good. People can't do without it

In some situations, you can be without the devices.

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