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Sat Nov 17, 2012, 04:25 PM

Low Mississippi River levels might halt barges

Source: Associated Press

Low Mississippi River levels might halt barges
By JIM SALTER, JIM SUHR
updated 2 hours 29 minutes ago

ST. LOUIS — The gentle whir of passing barges is as much a part of life in St. Louis as the Gateway Arch and the Cardinals, a constant, almost soothing backdrop to a community intricately intertwined with the Mississippi River.

But next month, those barges packing such necessities as coal, farm products and petroleum could instead be parked along the river's banks. The stubborn drought that has gripped the Midwest for much of the year has left the Mighty Mississippi critically low — and it will get even lower if the Army Corps of Engineers presses ahead with plans to reduce the flow from a Missouri River dam.

Mississippi River interests fear the reduced flow will force a halt to barge traffic at the river's midpoint. They warn the economic fallout will be enormous, potentially forcing job cuts, raising fuel costs and pinching the nation's food supply.

"This could be a major, major impact at crisis level," said Debra Colbert, senior vice president of the Waterways Council, a public policy organization representing ports and shipping companies. "It is an economic crisis that is going to ripple across the nation at a time when we're trying to focus on recovery."


Read more: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/49868252/ns/weather/

9 replies, 2174 views

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Arrow 9 replies Author Time Post
Reply Low Mississippi River levels might halt barges (Original post)
Judi Lynn Nov 2012 OP
leveymg Nov 2012 #1
madrchsod Nov 2012 #2
Sherman A1 Nov 2012 #3
judesedit Nov 2012 #4
proud2BlibKansan Nov 2012 #6
NickB79 Nov 2012 #5
DallasNE Nov 2012 #7
fasttense Nov 2012 #8
lunatica Nov 2012 #9

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 04:40 PM

1. Holy shit.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 05:07 PM

2. one barge holds 70 trailer loads of products......

that`s a lot of trucks , trailers, fuel, and drivers we don`t have...

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 06:17 PM

3. This was pretty much common knowledge

during the Summer drought.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 06:49 PM

4. Although this is not a funny situation at all,I can already hear them crying for FEMA if their state

winds up needing help. This is a red state. Can you imagine Rob-me's reaction to this. Sorry, get ready to help yourselves. Start preparing now because you're on your own. I wonder how many of their citizens signed the secession petition. Do they realize what they are asking for? God, how stupid some of the people in this country are.

This is in no way an affront to all of the wonderful Missourins who did their homework and did NOT get brainwashed by FAUX Noise. Thank you for trying to help your country and it's people. This is just an observation of how hypocritical the repugs are. The state governments get tons of money from the federal government and don't let their constituents know this so they can make informed decisions. They hide the truth, so the people stay as dumb as dirt. Right where they want them, so they keep shooting themselves in the foot over and over, by voting for those phonies. We'll see how this plays out.

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Response to judesedit (Reply #4)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 07:59 PM

6. It's already happening.

ST. LOUIS -- Fifteen senators from eight Mississippi River states are urging the Army Corps of Engineers to take steps to keep barges moving on the Mississippi.

Sens. Roy Blunt, a Missouri Republican, and Tom Harkin, an Iowa Democrat, penned the letter Friday with 13 co-signers.

It urges the corps to delay plans to reduce the flow from a Missouri River reservoir in South Dakota starting around Nov. 23, which would reduce the level of the Mississippi.

“If the river channel is not maintained, there will be a loss of jobs, income to many businesses and farmers, and an adverse impact to the economy of the region as a whole,” the letter said.

Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/2012/11/16/3921496/15-senators-urge-action-on-mississippi.html#storylink=cpy

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 07:51 PM

5. Welcome to the new normal in a warming world

Reduced rainfall appears to be a possible outcome of a warmer Arctic, with the jet stream permanently shifting to leave the US Midwest high and dry. We're going to have to make some incredible changes to survive this, since it's pretty much too late to stop it now.

http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/11/15/3098920/drought-forces-midwest-firm-to.html

DECATUR, Ill. -- At the height of this year's drought, decision-makers at the agribusiness giant Archers Daniels Midland kept an uneasy eye on the reservoir down the hill from their headquarters.

At one point, the water level fell to within 2 inches of the point where the company was in danger of being told for the first time ever that it couldn't draw as much as it wanted. The company uses millions of gallons of water a day to turn corn and soybeans into everything from ethanol and cattle feed to cocoa and a sweetener used in soft drinks and many other foods.

Rain eventually lifted Lake Decatur's level again. But the close call left ADM convinced that, like many Midwestern companies and the towns where they operate, it could no longer take an unrestricted water supply for granted, especially if drought becomes a more regular occurrence due to climate change or competition ramps up among water users.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 01:02 AM

7. Just A Year Earlier

There was a massive, summer long flood on the Missouri River that had Interstate 29 shut down for several months in much of western Iowa. It also knocked out both nuclear power plants in Nebraska and the one on the north side of Omaha still hasn't reopened. The year before that was another summer long flood but the river level was about 5 feet lower so there was much less damage. Barge traffic was not allowed during the floods. The wild swings are causing real problems.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 05:45 AM

8. Global climate change reminding RepubliCONS that

even if they don't believe in it, it's still here and messing with their river.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 12:14 PM

9. Well it's things like this that get public attention

It has to be. Climate change isn't something we can kick down the road for our grandchildren to deal with. When you can't ignore it anymore because crops fail from droughts and the Northeastern states are destroyed by a gigantic confluence of weather patterns and our most important commerce rivers dry up, then it's time to start paying attention. It's here. Let's start doing something to address it.

I dread to see what kind of winter this country is in for, again. When the powers that be allow the media to start covering this then things will begin to happen.

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