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Sun Oct 14, 2012, 02:26 PM

Skydiver lands safely after historic jump from edge of space

Source: CNN

Skydiver Felix Baumgartner landed safely on the ground Sunday after a record-shattering free fall from the edge of space.

"He made it -- tears of joy from Mission Control," the team said in a live feed.



Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/14/us/skydiver-record-attempt/index.html?hpt=hp_t2



A new record of 127,000+ feet, with Joe Kittinger acting as capcom

97 replies, 12286 views

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Reply Skydiver lands safely after historic jump from edge of space (Original post)
bill Oct 2012 OP
sarcasmo Oct 2012 #1
TeamPooka Oct 2012 #2
Viva_La_Revolution Oct 2012 #3
ffr Oct 2012 #13
muriel_volestrangler Oct 2012 #17
BlueStreak Oct 2012 #76
muriel_volestrangler Oct 2012 #78
BlueStreak Oct 2012 #79
muriel_volestrangler Oct 2012 #80
BlueStreak Oct 2012 #81
muriel_volestrangler Oct 2012 #83
BlueStreak Oct 2012 #86
Posteritatis Oct 2012 #97
go west young man Oct 2012 #28
lucabrasi Oct 2012 #4
calimary Oct 2012 #23
Uncle Joe Oct 2012 #5
bill Oct 2012 #9
Maynar Oct 2012 #31
calimary Oct 2012 #27
Odin2005 Oct 2012 #6
FirstLight Oct 2012 #7
Marksman_91 Oct 2012 #8
calimary Oct 2012 #29
frylock Oct 2012 #10
PD Turk Oct 2012 #14
GliderGuider Oct 2012 #37
awoke_in_2003 Oct 2012 #49
FarPoint Oct 2012 #56
PD Turk Oct 2012 #62
FarPoint Oct 2012 #63
PD Turk Oct 2012 #66
sakabatou Oct 2012 #11
PD Turk Oct 2012 #16
sakabatou Oct 2012 #19
PD Turk Oct 2012 #26
sakabatou Oct 2012 #33
UnrepentantLiberal Oct 2012 #40
sakabatou Oct 2012 #45
UnrepentantLiberal Oct 2012 #41
IVoteDFL Oct 2012 #12
Posteritatis Oct 2012 #15
calimary Oct 2012 #32
Great Caesars Ghost Oct 2012 #92
heaven05 Oct 2012 #18
KansDem Oct 2012 #20
PD Turk Oct 2012 #21
KansDem Oct 2012 #24
Posteritatis Oct 2012 #22
KansDem Oct 2012 #25
awoke_in_2003 Oct 2012 #50
Posteritatis Oct 2012 #51
awoke_in_2003 Oct 2012 #96
bill Oct 2012 #35
KansDem Oct 2012 #84
Smilo Oct 2012 #30
Captain_truthteller Oct 2012 #34
RebelOne Oct 2012 #73
underpants Oct 2012 #36
Ruby the Liberal Oct 2012 #38
primavera Oct 2012 #39
AtheistCrusader Oct 2012 #43
FarPoint Oct 2012 #53
Frank Cannon Oct 2012 #44
primavera Oct 2012 #46
XemaSab Oct 2012 #47
UnrepentantLiberal Oct 2012 #48
primavera Oct 2012 #58
PD Turk Oct 2012 #65
Fumesucker Oct 2012 #67
PD Turk Oct 2012 #68
primavera Oct 2012 #70
PD Turk Oct 2012 #88
daleo Oct 2012 #52
PD Turk Oct 2012 #89
kestrel91316 Oct 2012 #54
primavera Oct 2012 #59
TrogL Oct 2012 #55
Codeine Oct 2012 #57
primavera Oct 2012 #60
LanternWaste Oct 2012 #90
PD Turk Oct 2012 #61
BlueStreak Oct 2012 #87
snooper2 Oct 2012 #69
primavera Oct 2012 #71
snooper2 Oct 2012 #72
Throd Oct 2012 #85
primavera Oct 2012 #94
triplepoint Oct 2012 #42
Adenoid_Hynkel Oct 2012 #64
burrowowl Oct 2012 #74
MrsBrady Oct 2012 #75
jsr Oct 2012 #77
lunatica Oct 2012 #82
Great Caesars Ghost Oct 2012 #91
Lucy Fer Oct 2012 #93
Solly Mack Oct 2012 #95

Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 02:27 PM

1. That was one of the coolest thing I have ever seen. He was flipping early then got it under control

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 02:31 PM

2. that was awesome and crazy. Congrats Felix!

and worth every penny to Red Bull.
What a landing!

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 02:31 PM

3. but did he break the sound barrier?


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Response to Viva_La_Revolution (Reply #3)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 03:16 PM

13. Dunno either. Does anyone?

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Response to ffr (Reply #13)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 03:40 PM

17. Yes, he did

20.00 (13.00) He achieved the fastest ever freefall speed at 706mph during the four minutes and 19 seconds of free, according to spokesman Sarah Anderson, but she confirmed that he did not set a new record for the longest freefall.

19.53 (12.53) Felix Baumgartner did break the sound barrier, a spokesman has just confirmed.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/space/9607604/Skydiver-Felix-Baumgartner-attempts-to-break-sound-barrier-live.html

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Response to muriel_volestrangler (Reply #17)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 12:20 AM

76. Well, that may be a matter of semantics

It was a marvelous achievement and that guy has nerves of steel. Very cool.

But as far as the "sound barrier" thing goes, that "barrier" is a bit ambiguous, varying with air pressure and temperature. And considering he achieves that speed in a super thin atmosphere, the concept of "sound" is pretty iffy. If you don't have an atmosphere, you can't really have sound waves.

The claim really should be that he passed the speed where, in our normal atmosphere, he would have set off a sonic boom. But that speed in the atmosphere would have been instantly fatal without a protective capsule. It would have ripped his body apart.

What is really amazing is how long the previous record stood.

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Response to BlueStreak (Reply #76)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 05:18 AM

78. No, it's physics, not semantics

First of all, the 'barrier' is not ambiguous; the point about it is that is describes the behaviour of a fluid, and has real implications on how the fluid reacts to a body moving through it. There is enough atmosphere at that level to still measure the behaviour.

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Response to muriel_volestrangler (Reply #78)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 08:26 AM

79. My point is that it is not a precise speed

During the real time display, I didn't see the velocity go above 720. The "speed of sound" is something like 760 MPH, but that is at sea level. The speed varies widely.

After the jump, the team said his peak speed was in the 800s, so that is certainly above the "speed of sound" in the normal atmosphere.

Was there a "sonic boom" or did he just go faster than an arbitrary number? "Breaking the sound barrier" implies a boom, even if it is a small one.

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Response to BlueStreak (Reply #79)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 08:44 AM

80. It's not arbitrary

And, clearly, if he reached a maximum speed, then air resistance must have been what limited the speed. The current figure is reckoned to be 1342 km/h (834 mph - Mach 1.24 at that height, which gives a speed of sound of 673 mph at that height), or 373 m/s. Without air resistance, you'd reach that in 38 seconds. He didn't open a parachute until over 4 minutes into the fall; air resistance obviously did matter, even in the early stages of the fall.

I disagree about a 'boom' being part of breaking the sound barrier; as I said, it's about the physics of the airflow around him.

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Response to muriel_volestrangler (Reply #80)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 08:59 AM

81. "Breaking the sound barrier" implies a concussion / shock wave

Did such a shock happen? Has it been measured?

That was a question before the jump. If he "broke the barrier", would that be dangerous? We know that when aircraft do this in the normal atmosphere, creating an audible shock wave, this puts a lot of stress on the aircraft. I have not heard anything that indicates Baumgartner experienced anything like that. In fact, just the opposite. He said he really didn't feel anything -- no rippling of his jump suit. No wind noise, etc.

I don't mean to minimize the significance of this event. But I just question the imagery of him "breaking the sound barrier". It seems he did not do so in the sense most people understand that term (i.e. a sonic boom), although he went pretty darned fast.

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Response to BlueStreak (Reply #81)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 09:27 AM

83. It would be heard in a cone behind the falling man

where there wasn't anything to record it, apart from possibly the gondola.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonic_boom

Newshost:
Charles White, Poland asks: What does one hear aboard a supersonic aircraft during and after breaking the sound barrier?


Peter Benn:
You don't actually hear anything on board. All we see is the pressure wave moving down the aeroplane - it gives an indication on the instruments. And that's what we see of Mach 1. But we don't hear the sonic boom or anything like that. That's rather like the wake of ship - it's behind us.


Newshost:
Those passengers on board, sitting back in their leather seats and watching that Mach 1 speedo in front - what do they see, what do they feel?


Peter Benn:
They see the cabin display which shows the aircraft's altitude, groundspeed and Mach number which is the relationship to speed of sound. They see the indicator go through the figure 1 and then they know they've gone supersonic.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/talking_point/3207470.stm


The 'barrier' was called that because as planes got close to the speed of sound, their aerodynamic surfaces, especially the control surfaces, started behaving in unexpected ways - which made some think you'd never be able to control a plane going through that range. But they worked out what was happening.

The effect on the pressure suit does seem to have been small. Exactly how much that was expected, either through computer simulations, or through any testing they'd done (there are supersonic wind tunnels), I don't know. I think they said the pressure of air inside gave a certain rigidity to it at high altitude that helped him maintain the correct posture.

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Response to muriel_volestrangler (Reply #83)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 01:58 PM

86. Thanks. Interesting.

David Benner used to tell a joke abut the first guy who ever drank milk. I wouldn't have to guts to do that, let alone what Baumgartner did. But I did jump off a 150' high bridge with only a Bungee cord wrapped around a towel on my ankles with no safety harness.

Once. Never again.

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Response to BlueStreak (Reply #81)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 11:20 PM

97. Any concussion would be really faint at those air pressures

The density of the atmosphere at that altitude is a fraction of a percent of what it is at sea level - it's not vacuum, but it's more than close enough by the standards of anything that has "air" in one of the top positions on its "don't know how I could live without this" list.

Think of it as the difference between moving your hand quickly through water and moving your hand quickly through fog. There's much, much less pushing back in the latter, but both of those might as well be solid concrete compared to the air pressure at 120,000 feet. If there was an observer tagging along behind him, they might not even hear the boom or feel a shockwave, because there wouldn't be enough air hanging around to transmit sound or sensation.

A human breaking the sound barrier closer to sea level would have "closed casket service" on his to-do list afterwards. At that height doing so would involve breaking through something that was insubstantial in the first place.

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Response to Viva_La_Revolution (Reply #3)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 04:18 PM

28. He also broke the record for greatest height ever ascended in a balloon at over 127,000 feet.

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 02:35 PM

4. That was pretty incredible

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Response to lucabrasi (Reply #4)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 04:11 PM

23. ROFLMAO!!!!!!! That's freakin' HILARIOUS!!!!!

Shared! Stolen! OMG!!!!

Just really happy we CAN be joking about this. After all, the guy DID have a successful landing that he didn't just walk but trotted away from! Broke records not bones!

Nevertheless, if I were a Red Bull merchandiser, I'd be envisioning those images on every Red Bull store display on the planet!

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 02:40 PM

5. Cool, that's another little Star Trek hurdle out of the way.



Thanks for the thread, bill.

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Response to Uncle Joe (Reply #5)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 02:55 PM

9. there's still one more..

I want the rig that packs itself!

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Response to bill (Reply #9)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 04:29 PM

31. OH, yeah!

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Response to Uncle Joe (Reply #5)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 04:15 PM

27. LOVE IT!!!!

Shared!!!

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 02:43 PM

6. That was seriously cool.

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 02:49 PM

7. totally AWESOME!!!!

I made my kids watch too...we were all glued to the computer!

You realize this is about as close to a 'moon-walk' moment my kids' generation will have?

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 02:50 PM

8. What an amazing feat

This guy is the definition of balls of steel. Congratulations to him and the Red Bull Stratos team.

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Response to Marksman_91 (Reply #8)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 04:19 PM

29. Welcome to DU, Marksman_91!

No kidding! Can you just imagine... Break records, not bones!

Glad you're here! We need you! 'Cause this thing isn't nailed down yet.





Now get to work.

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 03:02 PM

10. did not know that was Joe Kittinger..

that's really cool!

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Response to frylock (Reply #10)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 03:20 PM

14. I agree

The fact that Little Joe helped him out through this whole thing just makes it that much cooler. I've been a JK fan for a long time. He's pretty sharp for being 84 years old.

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Response to PD Turk (Reply #14)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 05:05 PM

37. Same here

When I was 16, JK was the only man who could match the X-15 pilots for cool. The only other guy who qualified for that level of macho was John Stapp. Not even the Mercury guys measured up in my eyes.

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Response to frylock (Reply #10)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 05:45 PM

49. I agree...

and Joe still holds the record for longest period of free fall

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Response to frylock (Reply #10)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 06:24 PM

56. Here is the video of Joe Kittinger's jump

August, 1960!\\I never knew about Joe Kittinger until today............Amazing!




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Response to FarPoint (Reply #56)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 07:42 PM

62. Yup

Back then he was wearing a AF high altitude pressure suit and his balloon gondola was basically a platform with a canvas curtain around it. One of his gloves failed to pressurize on the way up and his hand swelled to twice its normal size, but he soldiered on and completed the jump.

"Little Joe" Kittinger weighed all of 150 lb soaking wet...... of which 50 lbs was his balls!

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Response to PD Turk (Reply #62)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 07:46 PM

63. This man is simply amazing...

His history.......jaw dropping!

He has the "Right Stuff" and then some.

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Response to FarPoint (Reply #63)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 07:59 PM

66. I've read this book twice

If you like this kind of stuff it's a great read

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/1557507325

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 03:03 PM

11. Does anyone have the video from the jump?

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Response to PD Turk (Reply #16)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 03:48 PM

19. Cool

But it doesn't look like he broke the barrier. The average speed of sound is 767 mph.

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Response to sakabatou (Reply #19)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 04:14 PM

26. 767 at sea level

The speed of sound gets lower as altitude increases

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Response to PD Turk (Reply #26)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 04:35 PM

33. Oh right... forgot about that



We'll see if the data corresponds to the barrier being broke.

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Response to sakabatou (Reply #33)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 05:23 PM

40. From CNN:

 

According to Brian Utley, an official observer on the site, the Austrian man dubbed "Fearless Felix" at one point fell as fast as Mach 1.24, well above the speed of sound, with nothing but a space suit, helmet and parachute, his support team said.

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Response to UnrepentantLiberal (Reply #40)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 05:35 PM

45. Huzzuh for science!

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Response to PD Turk (Reply #16)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 05:23 PM

41. That was awesome.

 

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 03:16 PM

12. How long until it's in a commercial that says "RedBull gives you wiiiings"

I'll bet this is what they had in mind the entire time.

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Response to IVoteDFL (Reply #12)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 03:31 PM

15. Of course it was; there's a reason the whole jump's named after them.

(Still awesome though, even if I can't stand really ostentatious "sponsorship" like that.)

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Response to IVoteDFL (Reply #12)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 04:30 PM

32. Well, if I were on their marketing team, that's absolutely what I'd be thinking.

In every Red Bull store display on the planet! Probably could get a few more stores that way too...

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Response to IVoteDFL (Reply #12)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 03:50 PM

92. That is a very good thought!

 

He jumped for the corporations. I totally agree that should never have been commercially sponsored.

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 03:43 PM

18. what???

it's already been done. The latest 'Star Trek' movie. Long way to fall. Kudos!

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 03:57 PM

20. One question...

If Baumgartner jumped from a higher height than Kittinger, then why didn't he also set a record for longest free fall?

I watched the jump and believe I heard he set new records for height and speed, but not longest free fall. Did he have to open his 'chute earlier due to the speed?

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Response to KansDem (Reply #20)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 04:02 PM

21. not sure

not sure what altitude he popped his chute at, but the reason he might have had a shorter elapsed free fall time is that he had a lot higher initial speed toward the top of the jump and it carried on down allowing him to cover the distance faster.

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Response to PD Turk (Reply #21)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 04:13 PM

24. That makes sense!

Thanks

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Response to KansDem (Reply #20)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 04:03 PM

22. Yeah, he opened his chute earlier than he planned. (nt)

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Response to Posteritatis (Reply #22)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 04:14 PM

25. Thanks!


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Response to Posteritatis (Reply #22)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 05:47 PM

50. I wonder if he did it on purpose...

so Joe Kittinger could retain one of the records. If so, that is pretty classy.

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Response to awoke_in_2003 (Reply #50)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 05:50 PM

51. Could be; he might have also been rattled from the spin, too

Spending thirty seconds getting beaten up by your own helmet's gotta be disorienting somewhat.

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Response to Posteritatis (Reply #51)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 10:59 PM

96. True. nt

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Response to KansDem (Reply #20)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 04:57 PM

35. because..

Kittinger wasn't really in freefall, he was in drougefall (like a tandem skydive). Felix was falling faster, especially at teh beginning, so freefall time was less even though the distance was greater.

Also, Kittenger was under canopy @ 15K' and used and automatic opener. Felix had a good canopy @ ~6K and didn't need the Cypres

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Response to bill (Reply #35)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 09:32 AM

84. Thanks!

I didn't know this!

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 04:27 PM

30. I watched every minute

it was wonderful and absolutely great that they had Kittinger be the sole person Baumgartner spoke with.

Great achievement well done all!

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 04:54 PM

34. I would never go skydiving

 

I can barely withstand a rollercoaster.

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Response to Captain_truthteller (Reply #34)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 09:46 PM

73. I have. I always wanted to try it.

I made 6 jumps before I decided to stop before I broke something. I had a few bad times in the air, mainly when I landed. I was dragged by the chute through rocks when the wind caught it, got lost in the air and couldn't find the drop zone and landed on my butt quite often.

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 04:58 PM

36. AWESOME!!!

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 05:09 PM

38. CNN is saying he hit Mach 1.24 top speed

That is beyond impressive.

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 05:22 PM

39. Umm, not to be a killjoy, but why do we care?

Did he discover a cure for some disease, or how to repair our failing ozone layer and reverse global climate change, or end world hunger, or bring back vital, previously unknown scientific knowledge? Does he have anything, anything at all, to show for having intentionally placed himself in an environment utterly hostile to life?

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Response to primavera (Reply #39)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 05:31 PM

43. Lots of biometric data.

Lots of materials data. His suit stood up to it. His body stood up to it. Might re-imagine possible escape scenarios for future human space travel.

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Response to AtheistCrusader (Reply #43)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 06:00 PM

53. Exactly!

The shuttles did not have an escape opportunity....

This was fantastic. Until today...I never knew anything about the great Kittinger either.

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Response to primavera (Reply #39)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 05:33 PM

44. Data was collected to try create escape systems...

And other safety features for astronauts. The medical director for this project lost his wife in the 2003 Space Shuttle disaster.

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Response to Frank Cannon (Reply #44)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 05:37 PM

46. Okay, that's pretty cool

Thanks!

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Response to primavera (Reply #39)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 05:38 PM

47. Why do people climb mountains or take solo journeys across the ocean?

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Response to primavera (Reply #39)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 05:41 PM

48. Because sometimes life can be fun and amazing?

 

Aren't there kids you need to be chasing off your lawn?

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Response to UnrepentantLiberal (Reply #48)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 07:23 PM

58. And if he had perished?

As he might well have? Would his death have been equally "fun and amazing"? You are quite right: life is amazing. Which is why it is a gift not to be squandered recklessly.

However, as others have pointed out, there was greater benefit to this endeavour than merely to provide you with fun and amusing sport and that's great, I'm glad that the risks he took were meaningful. It would have been a tragic waste had he died and accomplished no greater purpose than to give you a cheap thrill.

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Response to primavera (Reply #58)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 07:54 PM

65. For the last year

For the last year or so I've been watching my mom waste away in a nursing home. She can't hear, can barely see, has been paralyzed from a stroke for 17 years and is suffering from severe dementia. She refuses to eat and is slowly starving herself to death.

After watching this for the last year, I've developed a different point of view on death and dying. If he had died in the attempt today, sure, it would have been tragic, but it could have been a lot worse.

Given the choice I'd much rather die like that than the way mom is going

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Response to PD Turk (Reply #65)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 08:33 PM

67. Sorry about your mom, I agree with you..



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Response to Fumesucker (Reply #67)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 09:09 PM

68. Thanks Fumesucker

I ride motorcycles, I've always thought that would be as good of a way to go as any

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Response to PD Turk (Reply #65)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 09:33 PM

70. I'm so sorry

I've watched loved ones die slowly from terminal illnesses and I agree with you that there are far better ways of going.

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Response to primavera (Reply #70)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 02:10 PM

88. Thanks

It's been rough but we are getting through it one day at a time

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Response to primavera (Reply #39)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 05:58 PM

52. Recent research shows that daredevil stunts by men are more appealing to women

If they have a socially useful purpose, such as raising money for charity or for scientific/medical research purposes.

So they are generally framed that way, even though that is sometimes a stretch.

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Response to daleo (Reply #52)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 02:47 PM

89. Uh Oh



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Response to primavera (Reply #39)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 06:05 PM

54. People probably asked the same thing of the Wright brothers' little stunts, too.

Hey, no tax dollars were spent so I don't understand the whining at ALL.

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Response to kestrel91316 (Reply #54)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 07:29 PM

59. The Wright brothers had a vision

They weren't risking their lives in pursuit of an adrenaline rush. Happily, as others here have been gracious enough to inform me, this guy, too, had a greater purpose than mere sensationalism.

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Response to primavera (Reply #39)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 06:06 PM

55. I'm thinking this proves that could be used as part of an astronaut rescue system

...assuming we ever get another craft like the shuttle.

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Response to primavera (Reply #39)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 07:11 PM

57. Sometimes "Fucking Awesome" is all the reason one needs. nt

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Response to Codeine (Reply #57)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 07:34 PM

60. Yes, that certainly would have been a fine epitaph

For his headstone and no doubt a great comfort to his family and friends had he died. But, yet again, I'm told that his venture did achieve something more than being just "fucking awesome," whatever that means.

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Response to primavera (Reply #60)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 03:43 PM

90. I certainly understand those who are confused by humanities attempt to push itself beyond its define

I certainly understand those who are confused by humanities' attempt to push itself beyond its self-defined and self-imposed limits, regardless of a lack of any practical application.

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Response to Codeine (Reply #57)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 07:34 PM

61. +1000

Exactly

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Response to Codeine (Reply #57)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 02:01 PM

87. Well, it did set a new record for Youtube simulcast viewers

blowing away the old record by an order of magnitude.

That certainly has some scientific and commercial value.

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Response to primavera (Reply #39)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 09:23 PM

69. Billions and Billions of humans on this planet..

We can use a few of them for our entertainment..

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Response to snooper2 (Reply #69)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 09:35 PM

71. Volunteering?

Maybe you could jump the Grand Canyon and put your attempt on pay per view. It'd be fucking awesome.

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Response to primavera (Reply #71)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 09:40 PM

72. Nah, how about I try to drive from Vegas to Anaheim in 3 hours flat

Have to run that by the wife though before our trip

Luckily I don't have to volunteer because there are plenty of folks out there willing to do crazy/stupid/death defying/darwin award type stunts anyway. Just spend a little time on YouTube. And those are the ones TV producers don't even bother with LOL

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Response to primavera (Reply #39)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 11:10 AM

85. Umm, you are being a killjoy. Why do anything for fun that involves an element of risk?

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Response to Throd (Reply #85)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 04:45 PM

94. Good question

But the question I asked was not why some people risk their lives for fun, or even why Baumgartner chose to risk his life in this endeavor, but why we should care. And that question has now been answered.

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 05:26 PM

42. The Boundary to Space or Edge of Space

 

With data from a new instrument developed by scientists at the University of Calgary, scientists confirmed that space begins 73 miles (118 kilometers) above Earth's surface.

The United States, however, has never officially adopted a set boundary standard because it would complicate the issue of overflight rights of satellites and other orbiting bodies, according to NASA.

Reference Link:
http://www.space.com/6564-edge-space.html


When I took "Orbital Mechanics" in college, the instructor claimed that the "Edge of the Sensible Atmosphere" was 400,000 ft (75.75 statute miles).

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 07:46 PM

64. pfft! - Captain Kirk did it first

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 11:28 PM

74. Awesome!

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Response to bill (Original post)

Sun Oct 14, 2012, 11:53 PM

75. what courage...

i don't even like to climb stairs...

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Response to bill (Original post)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 02:32 AM

77. Kudos to Joe Kittinger

Kittinger's contributions were clearly indispensable throughout the whole thing.

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Response to bill (Original post)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 09:07 AM

82. I finally saw it!

Cool!

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Response to bill (Original post)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 03:46 PM

91. It'll be only a very short amount of time before......

 

someone will attempt the first space jump, more than likely from the ISS.

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Response to bill (Original post)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 03:55 PM

93. That guy cojones

 

That's a high distance!

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Response to bill (Original post)

Mon Oct 15, 2012, 05:00 PM

95. Wow.

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