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Sat Sep 15, 2012, 07:05 PM

Birmingham marks anniversary of church bombing (one of the worst acts of violence of civil rights )

Source: AP

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Birmingham residents laid wreaths Friday and planned memorial services this weekend to mark the 49th anniversary of a church bombing that killed four black children in one of the worst acts of violence during the civil rights movement.

About 80 people gathered Friday in Kelly Ingram park to remember the four children killed when members of the Ku Klux Klan bombed the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Two other black youths were killed in violence later that tense day.

"Sometimes tragedies have to happen for us to unite," Myrna Jackson, first vice president of the Metro Birmingham NAACP, said at the rally, according to The Birmingham News (http://bit.ly/R6nDoI). "Don't fool yourself into thinking all is well, because it's not. We're on our way but we're not quite there."

The bomb exploded just before a Sunday worship service on Sept. 15, 1963, killing Cynthia Wesley, Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson and Denise McNair. Two more black youths, Virgil Ware and Johnny Robinson, were shot to death later that day.

FULL story at link.


Read more: http://www.al.com/newsflash/index.ssf/story/birmingham-marks-anniversary-of-church-bombing/7742cf83f32f45a191ff8ddd2d499aa2




Also: http://www.infoplease.com/spot/bhmjustice3.html



by Borgna Brunner

The Sept. 15, 1963, bombing at the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, was one of the most abhorrent crimes of the civil rights movement. Four young girls attending Sunday school—Denise McNair, Cynthia Wesley, Carole Robertson, and Addie Mae Collins, aged 11 to 14—were killed when a bomb exploded at the church. Twenty others were injured. The church was a center for civil rights meetings, and just a few days earlier, courts had ordered the desegregation of Birmingham's schools.

Bobby Frank Cherry, a demolitions expert, and three other white supremacists—Robert Chambliss, Thomas Blanton, and Herman Cash—were under investigation within days of the bombing. But two years later, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover declined to pursue the case, saying the chances for conviction were "remote." In 1968, federal authorities shut down the investigation.

In the 1970s, after a U.S. Justice Department investigation revealed that former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover had blocked evidence, Jefferson County, Ala., prosecutors reopened the case. More than a decade-and-a-half after the crime, the ringleader, Robert Chambliss, was convicted of one count of murder in the death of Carol McNair in 1977. He died in prison in 1985 without ever publicly admitting a role in the bombing. By this time, it was too late to try suspect Herman Cash, who had died in 1994.

The remaining two suspects in the case, Thomas Blanton and Bobby Frank Cherry, were finally indicted in 2000—more than two decades after Chambliss's conviction—when an FBI agent in Birmingham obtained more than 9,000 FBI documents and surveillance tapes that had been kept from the original prosecutors. Blanton was convicted of murder in 2001 and sentenced to life in prison. In Cherry's trial, several of his relatives came forward to testify against him. Cherry had bragged to a number of them over the years about the bombing. In 2002, he was convicted of four counts of murder and sentenced to life in prison, where he died in 2004. One of the prosecutors in the case, Robert Posey, said Cherry "has worn this crime like a badge of honor."





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Reply Birmingham marks anniversary of church bombing (one of the worst acts of violence of civil rights ) (Original post)
Omaha Steve Sep 2012 OP
Faygo Kid Sep 2012 #1
heaven05 Sep 2012 #2
elbloggoZY27 Sep 2012 #3
Judi Lynn Sep 2012 #4
classof56 Sep 2012 #5
ailsagirl Sep 2012 #6
mountain grammy Sep 2012 #7
FailureToCommunicate Sep 2012 #8

Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sat Sep 15, 2012, 07:08 PM

1. Haunting. The fight goes on, the losses are intolerable.

Old enough to remember, and to never forget.

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sat Sep 15, 2012, 07:12 PM

2. I remember

49 years, wow. And still people are fighting for their basic voting rights. Is this a great country or what. Not!

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sat Sep 15, 2012, 07:41 PM

3. Very Ugly Times

 

This was the lowest point in time for this Country. It was an act perpetrated by the most intolerant of our society.

This anniversary should be remembered like the Holocaust as an event that hopefully never ever happens again.


Unfortunately some of the same seeds of intolerance are being sown once again by a Party that does not remember the past.


The young ladies that lost their lives due to this demonic act should not be forgotten. Never.

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sat Sep 15, 2012, 07:56 PM

4. What kind of person would EVER consider bombing churches, anyway?

It's a real shame those four men were ever born.

It's a shrieking monstrosity those four girls had their lives ripped from them and their friends, loved ones, and the world of human beings plunged into grief.

How sad it is that four pieces of filth with weapons can do this kind of damage to the living world and to the possibility of hope.

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sat Sep 15, 2012, 08:14 PM

5. I just watched (once again) the video of Joan Baez singing Birmingham Sunday.

One of the saddest songs in our nation's musical lexicon. Such an awful event is beyond comprehension. Words truly do fail me each time I hear the song and see the photos of those beautiful girls killed by such abominable creatures. I will not call them human beings. And it's downright depressing to think that mindset still exists among so many of our populace.

Rest in peace, beautiful girls. We shall not forget!

OBAMA/BIDEN 2012

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sat Sep 15, 2012, 08:20 PM

6. Despicable

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sat Sep 15, 2012, 08:32 PM

7. Having lived in the south for a while as a 10 year old in 1958, all I can say is

you had to be there. That's when I learned the difference between the "idea" of America and the "reality" of America.

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sat Sep 15, 2012, 09:43 PM

8. That terrible event...the subject of Richard Farina's wrenching song:

Birmingham Sunday (as sung by Joan Baez)

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

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