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Mon Jul 30, 2012, 05:57 PM

Assange's mom says Wikileaks founder suffering

Source: CBS

QUITO, Ecuador (AP) - The mother of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange says her son's health is suffering after more than a month confined to Ecuador's embassy in London ...

The mother told an Ecuadorean TV station Monday that her son, owing to his cramped living conditions and inability to exercise, has extreme psychological stress.

The activist who published secret U.S. documents took refuge in the embassy on June 19 to avoid extradition to Sweden, where he is wanted for questioning about allegations of sexual misconduct ...



Read more: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-202_162-57482490/assanges-mom-says-wikileaks-founder-suffering/



First, he's set up by a Swedish woman who forces him to sex with him while she's unconscious! Then he has to flee Sweden in terror, when Swedish authorities begin phoning his lawyer, trying to schedule a follow-up interview! Next the British courts refuse to grant him bail unless his friends cough up a quarter of a million quid in cash and guarantees, and after that they actually have the temerity to rule against him! Finally, the Brits chase him into the tiny Ecuadorian embassy and won't let him leave!

It's a plot by radical feminazi swedish cia double agents!

67 replies, 12510 views

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Arrow 67 replies Author Time Post
Reply Assange's mom says Wikileaks founder suffering (Original post)
struggle4progress Jul 2012 OP
monmouth Jul 2012 #1
Hissyspit Jul 2012 #2
struggle4progress Jul 2012 #7
truthisfreedom Jul 2012 #10
Hissyspit Jul 2012 #17
pnwmom Jul 2012 #29
Hissyspit Jul 2012 #51
pnwmom Jul 2012 #52
struggle4progress Jul 2012 #18
KoKo Jul 2012 #19
struggle4progress Jul 2012 #33
KoKo Jul 2012 #34
struggle4progress Jul 2012 #38
Tarheel_Dem Aug 2012 #59
greiner3 Jul 2012 #4
Nostradammit Jul 2012 #13
monmouth Jul 2012 #15
frylock Jul 2012 #26
Tarheel_Dem Aug 2012 #58
99th_Monkey Jul 2012 #3
msanthrope Jul 2012 #5
starroute Jul 2012 #6
msanthrope Jul 2012 #9
KoKo Jul 2012 #22
pnwmom Jul 2012 #30
cali Jul 2012 #43
starroute Jul 2012 #48
cali Jul 2012 #54
starroute Jul 2012 #55
Zorro Jul 2012 #8
rainy Jul 2012 #11
struggle4progress Jul 2012 #14
Hissyspit Jul 2012 #16
struggle4progress Jul 2012 #20
KoKo Jul 2012 #24
pnwmom Jul 2012 #32
frylock Jul 2012 #25
struggle4progress Jul 2012 #42
Hissyspit Jul 2012 #49
Hissyspit Jul 2012 #50
pnwmom Jul 2012 #31
KoKo Jul 2012 #36
pnwmom Jul 2012 #41
glinda Jul 2012 #35
1monster Jul 2012 #53
glinda Jul 2012 #57
cali Jul 2012 #44
Coyotl Jul 2012 #12
KoKo Jul 2012 #21
joshcryer Jul 2012 #23
KoKo Jul 2012 #27
Trillo Jul 2012 #28
glinda Jul 2012 #37
boppers Jul 2012 #39
glinda Jul 2012 #56
Monk06 Jul 2012 #40
Tarheel_Dem Aug 2012 #61
Moltisanti Jul 2012 #45
proverbialwisdom Jul 2012 #46
proverbialwisdom Jul 2012 #47
Marrah_G Aug 2012 #60
struggle4progress Aug 2012 #62
proverbialwisdom Aug 2012 #63
struggle4progress Aug 2012 #64
ljm2002 Aug 2012 #65
struggle4progress Aug 2012 #66
Ash_F Aug 2012 #67

Response to struggle4progress (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 06:00 PM

1. I must find that violin of mine...n/t

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Response to monmouth (Reply #1)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 06:05 PM

2. Ugly, ill-informed, and unnecessary.

As is all the garbage in the OP.

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Response to Hissyspit (Reply #2)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 07:01 PM

7. Here are some nice links for you:

A few links indicating the sex-with-unconscious-woman aspect:

... According to the Swedish branch of Interpol, a recent arrest warrant for Assange states that the rape accusation stems from a sexual encounter in which the woman "was asleep and in a helpless state" ...
Behind Assange's Arrest: Sweden's Sex-Crime Problem
By Eben Harrell / Stockholm Thursday, Dec. 16, 2010
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,2037078,00.html

... A second woman says Assange had sex with her without a condom while he was a guest at her Stockholm home and she was asleep ...
Sweden appeals bail for Assange
BY DAVID STRINGER
Associated Press
http://www.heraldsun.com/view/full_story/10670890/article-Sweden-appeals-bail-for-Assange

From the recent Australian Four Corners piece:

... Ardin and Wilen went to Central Stockholm's Klara police station to see if they could compel Assange to take an STD test ...
Sex, Lies and Julian Assange
By Andrew Fowler and Wayne Harley
Updated July 24, 2012 15:49:00
http://www.abc.net.au/4corners/stories/2012/07/19/3549280.htm

What Assange's lawyer told the British courts:

... Julian Assange's lawyer told a court yesterday that prosecutors attempted to interview the WikiLeaks founder over sexual assault allegations while he was still in Sweden. Bjorn Hurtig's admission contradicts his previous claim that the Swedish authorities had only asked to speak with Mr Assange after he had left the country. The lawyer admitted under cross-examination that he was mistaken to suggest that he had heard nothing from prosecutor Marianne Ny until after Mr Assange had left the country. He accepted that he was in regular contact via text message and telephone with Ms Ny, but had forgotten to include the fact in his witness statement ...
Assange lawyer admits he was wrong over interview
By Mark Hughes , Crime Correspondent
Wednesday 09 February 2011
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/assange-lawyer-admits-he-was-wrong-over-interview-2208622.html

A quick look at Assange's views on this:

... Mr Assange regards himself as a victim of radicalism. "Sweden is the Saudi Arabia of feminism," he said. "I fell into a hornets' nest of revolutionary feminism" ...
WikiLeaks founder baffled by sex assault claims
by: Marie Colvin
From: The Sunday Times
December 27, 2010 12:00AM
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/in-depth/wikileaks/wikileaks-founder-baffled-by-sex-assault-claims/story-fn775xjq-1225976459286

... After a strange few days of contact with the women, one of whom said she wanted me to do an STD test, I needed some time and space to myself, so I booked into a hotel for the night ...
Julian Assange: 'I did not rape those women'
In the first extract from the book, Julian Assange gives his version of the background to accusations of sexual assault that have led to his battle against extradition to Sweden
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/julian-assange-i-did-not-rape-those-women-2358652.html

Bottom line: The women apparently claim that they consented to sex with condom but got sex without condom, for which they had not consented, one case occurring when the woman was unconscious, which would actually be rape in many juriosdictions. Absent the condom, the women were concerned about STDs, as even Assange himself admits. The original complaint have been intended to force an STD test after the unprotected sex. Assange, however, was uncooperative and left Sweden while Swedish authorities were trying, through his lawyer, to schedule an interview with him: his comments on "revolutionary feminism" clearly exhibit his contempt. You can look up for yourself the bail cash and sureties that people fronted on Assange's behalf, before he jumped bail and hid in Ecuador's embassy

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Response to struggle4progress (Reply #7)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 07:09 PM

10. If all of these articles are to be believed, Julian isn't in such a terribly good position.

I think the fact that he's free at all (well, not behind actual bars) is pretty amazing.

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Response to truthisfreedom (Reply #10)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 08:36 PM

17. Well, she didn't post any of the articles that counter those articles.

She has quite the agenda.

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Response to Hissyspit (Reply #17)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 09:18 PM

29. Why haven't you posted them? Because until Assange submits to interrogation

based on the Swedish rape charges, there is nothing to counter them. He needs to go back to Sweden and defend himself, like any man accused of rape.

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Response to pnwmom (Reply #29)

Tue Jul 31, 2012, 03:32 PM

51. I have. A billion fucking times.

They then get conveniently ignored again and again.

Like you are doing in your post.

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Response to Hissyspit (Reply #51)

Tue Jul 31, 2012, 03:35 PM

52. Without Assange's own testimony, we'll never get to the facts.

But he doesn't want to submit himself to Swedish justice.

Are you one of the people who think it isn't rape under the circumstances described? That it isn't rape if he didn't use the condom that had been agreed upon, and forced himself on a sleeping woman?

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Response to truthisfreedom (Reply #10)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 08:38 PM

18. Dunno. The Swedish matter is still at the investigation stage, and I have no idea

what the investigation would actually conclude, or what the final outcome would be if any charges were actually filed. What the record does show, I think, is that Assange is a megalomaniac, not at all above histrionic game-playing -- and that the standard story, told about the Swedish case by some of his supporters (and his lawyers) in recent years, is a big steaming smelly load

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Response to struggle4progress (Reply #7)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 08:47 PM

19. But....you have seemed to have some problem with him for awhile now.

So...you are doing "opposition research" from where?

Many of the rest of us follow him from other places....so we would have differing views, I think.

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Response to KoKo (Reply #19)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 09:23 PM

33. I have little tolerance for bullshit, and Wikileaks supporters have shoveled bullshit

by the carload

Anybody familiar with the history of American realpolitick can understand why there might be a certain amount of international schadenfreude associated with the Wikileaks cable releases. It's always fun to see the-powers-that-be smecked in the schnozz. But that, in itself, doesn't prove anything: it doesn't prove that the cable releases were important whistle-blowing or a brave step towards openness

When the cables first came out, and people starting oohing-and-aahing that "We wouldn't have known about this except for Wikileaks," I did a few little experiments, randomly grabbing a dozen supposedly "new" stories from the Wikileaks cable coverage and searching for what I could have learned about the stories just from available news coverage BEFORE Wikileaks -- and in all the cases I examined, I could have gotten plenty of information from pre-existing web news reports, and I expect much of the info would have been better than the reports from the embassies

There's also the fact that careful principled selection of information matters. A good reporter doesn't just grab a lot of documents to dump on you: some effort is required to understand what is being shown, and how it ties into contexts simply not revealed by the documents themselves. Such editorial work is even more important when there are serious human rights issues and people's life and liberty might be at stake. There's no reason to think Wikileaks has ever had the expertise, the humility, or the patience necessary to engage in the process of evaluating the information and trying to make a coherent story from the leaks. This is partly because Wikileaks actually has no coherent philosophy and analysis: it works from the anarchistic-libertarian stance that everybody should be able to know everything. That may sound attractive in the abstract, until one begins to realize that it is sometimes adult to ask: who exactly is wanting to know what, and why do they want to know it?

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Response to struggle4progress (Reply #33)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 09:34 PM

34. So you blame WikiLeaks and Assange for not Providing a Narrative?

Quote from you about this:

"When the cables first came out, and people starting oohing-and-aahing that "We wouldn't have known about this except for Wikileaks," I did a few little experiments, randomly grabbing a dozen supposedly "new" stories from the Wikileaks cable coverage and searching for what I could have learned about the stories just from available news coverage BEFORE Wikileaks -- and in all the cases I examined, I could have gotten plenty of information from pre-existing web news reports, and I expect much of the info would have been better than the reports from the embassies

There's also the fact that careful principled selection of information matters. A good reporter doesn't just grab a lot of documents to dump on you: some effort is required to understand what is being shown, and how it ties into contexts simply not revealed by the documents themselves. Such editorial work is even more important when there are serious human rights issues and people's life and liberty might be at stake. There's no reason to think Wikileaks has ever had the expertise, the humility, or the patience necessary to engage in the process of evaluating the information and trying to make a coherent story from the leaks. This is partly because Wikileaks actually has no coherent philosophy and analysis:"

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Response to KoKo (Reply #34)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 09:55 PM

38. Inside WikiLeaks’ Leak Factory

—By David Kushner
Tue Apr. 6, 2010 12:21 PM PDT

... When I contacted the impressive figures listed on its advisory board, some didn't know they were mentioned on the site or had little idea how they got there. Tashi Namgyal Khamsitsang, a former representative of the Dalai Lama, recalls getting a cryptic email from WikiLeaks a few years ago, but says he never agreed to be an advisor. Noam Chomsky is listed as a volunteer administrator of the WikiLeaks Facebook group. This is news to him. "I know nothing about it," he says ...

WikiLeaks' stance that all leaks are good leaks and its disregard for the established protocols for verifying them also alarms some journalists. The site suffers from "a distorted sense of transparency," according to Kelly McBride, the ethics group leader for the Poynter Institute for Media Studies. "They're giving you everything they've got, but when journalists go through process of granting someone confidentiality, when they do it well, they determine that source has good information and that the source is somehow deserving of confidentiality." Lucy Dalglish, executive director of the Reporters Committee for the Freedom of the Press, thinks WikiLeaks' approach gives fresh ammunition to those who seek to pressure journalists to cough up the names of their unnamed sources. She forbids her staff from using the site as a source ...

Assange's efforts have undeniably had an impact, but whether that impact has been entirely positive is debatable. Not long after Assange claims he was targeted in Kenya, WikiLeaks published a report from the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights linking the national police to the torture and death of 500 young men suspected of opposition activity. The Kenyan government had buried the report, but after WikiLeaks published it, the Sunday Times of London picked up the story, and the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Extrajudicial, Summary, or Arbitrary Execution called for Kenya's attorney general and police commissioner to be fired.

WikiLeaks paid a price for its coup. Two Kenyan human rights activists were assassinated in broad daylight—the result, Assange says, of their links to the leaking of the report. The problem, he says, was not that WikiLeaks failed to protect their identities but that they "weren't acting in an anonymous way." Assange might be accused of a similar disregard for security—after all, he'd traveled to Nairobi after WikiLeaks' first big Kenyan leak. Nevertheless, Assange says there's been a concerted campaign to silence him and his collaborators, vaguely citing an "ambush" of a colleague last year. (He's since described it as an encounter with a "'James Bond' character in a Luxembourg car park, an event that ended with a mere 'we think it would be in your interest to…'") ...

http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2010/04/wikileaks-julian-assange-iraq-video?page=1

Just dumping a shitload of stuff without knowing what you're doing isn't a favor to anybody. And as the Kenyan case suggests, it might get people killed

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Response to struggle4progress (Reply #38)

Wed Aug 1, 2012, 02:02 PM

59. Thanks,. This is very informative. Needless to say, most articles here are very pro Wiki/Assange,

and while others accuse you of "an agenda", I suggest they find a mirror.

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Response to monmouth (Reply #1)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 06:43 PM

4. WTF?????????????????????

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Response to monmouth (Reply #1)


Response to Nostradammit (Reply #13)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 08:03 PM

15. Aren't you brilliant now...LOL.

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Response to monmouth (Reply #15)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 09:04 PM

26. almost as brilliant as that violin line!

i mean, that is comedy gold!! is that from a movie, or did you just make that up? regardless, positively brilliant! i really must write that one down to use in future. thanks!

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Response to monmouth (Reply #1)

Wed Aug 1, 2012, 01:39 PM

58. +1





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Response to struggle4progress (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 06:40 PM

3. Why can't he simply hide in the back of a laundry truck to escape?

You know, like they do in the movies.


I wish him well, and hope his health improves.

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Response to struggle4progress (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 06:46 PM

5. Poor Julian, living without a gym....nt

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Response to msanthrope (Reply #5)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 06:55 PM

6. Gym? It's about things like not being able to go out for walks

You should try living in a small building and never getting to go outside for a month before you make cracks about "living without a gym."

Oh, and add in wondering if you're going to get handed over to the US and wind up like Bradley Manning.

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Response to starroute (Reply #6)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 07:06 PM

9. TFB. nt

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Response to msanthrope (Reply #9)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 08:53 PM

22. What's your problem with Assange. Can you post about it?

Or are we just supposed to think: "Assange BAD!" because "we say so!" I'd like to hear more than an acronym.



so what is it?

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Response to starroute (Reply #6)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 09:19 PM

30. He can probably get more exercise in a Swedish jail while he awaits his trial. n/t

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Response to starroute (Reply #6)

Tue Jul 31, 2012, 03:21 AM

43. oh fucking please

and you should try living with a badly broken leg for 11 months and Complex Regional Pain syndrome. That's what I live with every day. And I try and find some intellectual, spiritual and psychological benefits to it instead of letting it crush me. I can't go out for walks. OK. That's the way it is. I'll find something else.

I don't feel sorry for Assange. I don't believe he raped those women but he made choices. We all get to live with our choices and if something bad happens to us that isn't a matter of choice, then we have to choose how to work with that- or not.

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Response to cali (Reply #43)

Tue Jul 31, 2012, 01:13 PM

48. There are other factors, you know

It sounds as though your problems are something you have to live with -- in which case you're to be commended for your patience.

But Assange is in a situation where he's hanging on Ecuador's willingness to make a decision -- and his mother is trying to speed up the process a bit by appealing to the Ecuadorian people over Ecuadorian television.

So is that self-pity -- or is it just a shrewd political move?

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Response to starroute (Reply #48)

Tue Jul 31, 2012, 04:21 PM

54. It's not about being commended-

Start where you, are to quote Pema Chodron.

And there's something a touch yucky about claiming her son is suffering and that includes doing it for political purposes- and if it is for political purposes, I'm not sure it's particularly effective. Those in the know, know exactly where Mr. Assange is currently living- in a mansion on Hans Place or Hans Road; I forget which. In any case, in a mansion in Knightsbridge, a stone's throw from Harrod's. And I'll bet almost anything there's a gym on the premises and some sort of garden or terrace.

In any case, he did make choices. He gets to live with the consequences.

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Response to cali (Reply #54)

Tue Jul 31, 2012, 08:44 PM

55. Gym? Sure doesn't sound like it -- it's a six-room apartment

http://www.dailylocal.com/article/20120709/NEWS05/120709708

Assange is living and working pretty much as normal inside a small office that also serves as his bedroom. Supporters say he could continue to reside in the embassy, close to the world famous Harrods store in upscale Knightsbridge, for months. Gavin MacFadyen, a supporter and director of the Center for Investigative Journalism at London’s City University, has visited Assange inside the building and says that while “it’s not quite the Hilton,” embassy staffers are “jolly” and getting along well with the activist. The building has about five or six rooms and previously was an apartment. Assange has a bed, access to a phone and a connection to the Internet. He can also receive guests, though the space is cramped.


http://www.dailylocal.com/article/20120709/NEWS05/120709708

Assange has been living in a 15-square-foot room at the embassy since June 19 to avoid extradition to Sweden to face sexual assault charges, The Guardian reports.

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Response to struggle4progress (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 07:05 PM

8. Boo hoo hoo

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Response to struggle4progress (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 07:25 PM

11. What is happening to DU? What snarky remarks about a man who is a universal hero.

He has risked his life to bring truth to the public.

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Response to rainy (Reply #11)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 08:01 PM

14. Daniel Domscheit-Berg And WikiLeaks' Insecure Future

Wednesday, May 4th, 2011
Wikileaks
Maria Bustillos

... WikiLeaks is no longer in possession of the secure submission platform built by a programmer identified in the book only as "the architect." Both Domscheit-Berg and the architect broke with Assange in September 2010 along with at least four other staffers. When he departed the architect apparently packed up his intellectual property and took it with him ...

... Assange was apparently annoyed whenever Domscheit-Berg was described as a "founder" of WikiLeaks. Given that Domscheit-Berg busted tail like one, quit his day job and used the severance money to buy servers for the project and dedicated every waking moment to the organization starting from before even the Julius Baer revelations of 2008, you'd think that Assange would have been happy to call him a founder. But no. Domscheit-Berg's version of events is here quite credible, for Assange's public pronouncements have often bordered on the megalomaniacal. In private, they bounded right over that border ...

... Assange, according to Domscheit-Berg, eventually demanded absolute control over every aspect of WikiLeaks operations, from financial management to publicity and even to deciding what revenge to take against journalists who wrote unsympathetically about him or the project. He became an ever-looser cannon ...

Then, because all you do is always for the greater good, such lies as you choose to tell are spotless, too. As it happens, Assange's old hacker name, "Mendax", means "liar" in Latin.

http://www.theawl.com/2011/05/wikileakss-insecure-future-with-an-interview-with-daniel-domscheit-berg

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Response to struggle4progress (Reply #14)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 08:29 PM

16. Domscheit-Berg is not to be taken seriously at all.

He has been shown to be incredibly mendacious.

I've seen all your links. You apparently think you have something to show or tell me that I'm not already aware of.

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Response to Hissyspit (Reply #16)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 08:49 PM

20. Do you realize you're replying to a post in which I wasn't replying to you

and which therefore could not possibly have been an attempt to show or tell you anything?

But it would not surprise me if Domscheit-Berg were shown to be incredibly mendacious. The link I provided immediately prior gives some indications of the lies he admits telling. As he tells it, he and Assange have both done a lot of lying. That is, I think, consistent with the cumulative evidence that Assange is a manipulative megalomaniac with very little regard for the truth or for others

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Response to struggle4progress (Reply #20)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 08:56 PM

24. How is releasing Diplomatic Cables and allowing MSM to decide to release them

being a QUOTE YOU: "Assange is a manipulative megalomaniac with very little regard for the truth or for others."

What's your REAL BEEF with him? It can't be TRUTH..because he was releasing Diplomatic Cables to the MSM to parse through before they decided what to release!

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Response to KoKo (Reply #24)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 09:22 PM

32. And then he made all the cables freely available. n/t

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Response to struggle4progress (Reply #20)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 09:01 PM

25. start your own private fucking message board..

or deal with the fact that people, other than those you've deigned to address, will call you out on your bullshit.

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Response to frylock (Reply #25)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 11:11 PM

42. '... WikiLeaks has also infuriated the author, Michela Wrong, who was horrified to discover

her book exposing the depths of official corruption in Kenya, It's Our Turn To Eat, was pirated and posted on WikiLeaks in its entirety ... From email distribution lists she could see that the pirated version was being emailed among Kenyans at home and abroad. "I was beside myself because I thought my entire African market is vanishing," says Wrong. "I wrote to WikiLeaks and said, please, you're going to damage your own cause because if people like me can't make any money from royalties then publishers are not going to commission people writing about corruption in Africa ... He was enormously pompous, saying that in the interests of raising public awareness of the issues involved I had a duty to allow it to be pirated. He said: 'This book may have been your baby, but it is now Kenya's son.' That really stuck in my mind because it was so arrogant," she says ... WikiLeaks does apparently expect others to respect its claims to ownership. It has placed a copyright symbol at the beginning of its film about the Iraq shootings ...'
Who watches WikiLeaks?
This week a classified video of a US air crew killing unarmed Iraqis was seen by millions on the internet. But for some, the whistleblowing website itself needs closer scrutiny
Chris McGreal in Washington
guardian.co.uk, Friday 9 April 2010 16.28 EDT
http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2010/apr/10/wikileaks-collateral-murder-video-iraq

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Response to struggle4progress (Reply #20)

Tue Jul 31, 2012, 03:27 PM

49. I was replying to your other post to me, as well, all in one post.

All it proves is that Domsciet-Berg is a liar.

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Response to struggle4progress (Reply #20)

Tue Jul 31, 2012, 03:28 PM

50. I was replying to your other post to me, as well, all in one post.

All it proves is that Domscheit-Berg is a liar.

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Response to rainy (Reply #11)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 09:21 PM

31. He risked the lives of American allies to make a name for himself. n/t

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Response to pnwmom (Reply #31)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 09:42 PM

36. But "SFP" says there was nothing new there in Cable Leaks

He blames Assange for not putting them together in a "Narrative." Now you say he "risked the lives of Amrican Allies to make a name for himself" ....and yet you provide no links as to the "deaths or risks" that were caused because Assange released the Leaks to MSM for them to Parse!

So...perhaps the blame for whatever you say (without links to prove the danger) belongs in the laps of the Media who were parsing these tapes to decide what they would publish. Surely you won't blame the NYT's (Judith Miller) for being given info that they decided to release or the Guardian or others when Assange did give them the Info.

Do you see how hypocritical this is? Blame one person who "gets off" *Judith Miller, etc...then blame the next when they "follow some rules to the MSM?

Give me one death caused by Assange that has been verified by his WikiLeaks release?

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Response to KoKo (Reply #36)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 11:00 PM

41. If the US government were to provide the info you're demanding, that would put more lives --

people connected to those already harmed by the leaks -- in danger.

But people's lives were put at risk, just as Valerie Plame's associates were put at risk when Cheney leaked her identity.

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Response to rainy (Reply #11)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 09:41 PM

35. Looks like some who make the remarks seem to have small number of posts.

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Response to glinda (Reply #35)

Tue Jul 31, 2012, 04:04 PM

53. Oh! Nasty. And nasty again. Especially considering that the person you are replying to

has been a member of DU since 2002, six years before you joined.

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Response to 1monster (Reply #53)

Tue Jul 31, 2012, 11:57 PM

57. Am honored you looked at my information. Unfortunately you misinterpreted what I had said.

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Response to rainy (Reply #11)

Tue Jul 31, 2012, 03:24 AM

44. I don't believe in Universal heroes. I think people are complicated

I think their motives are almost invariably complex. I don't live in a fairy tale world of bromides and cliches. Never have. Saw too much too young I guess.

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Response to struggle4progress (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 07:54 PM

12. Whatever happened to the good old days when liberals disappeared in the jungle

after being thrown out of a plane or helicopter? Things would be a lot worst for Assange in other times or places.

That said, what did he expect on his path?

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Response to struggle4progress (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 08:49 PM

21. Assange has done Terrific Interviews with Emerging World Leaders

on RT.

They have been fascinating to watch since we get none of that here in the USA on MSM.

It would be very sad to lose his voice and his inspiration of what he hoped to do "good" in the world as he saw it. And, how he sees "communication" and bringing the WORLD together with a MEDIA that is allowed to show THE PEOPLE...views from all sides...and respect they might have the intelligence to make their OWN opinions.

We don't have that in US today.

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Response to struggle4progress (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 08:56 PM

23. When I was basically a shut in I gained 50 lbs and had angina attacks daily.

It's not a good way to live (though when I was that way I was OK with it, I realized that it was detrimental to my health).

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Response to joshcryer (Reply #23)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 09:05 PM

27. No...it's not good for anyone to live that way....

but, since "Stolen election of 2000" many have forced themselves to live that way...thinking they were working for "a cause."

To take away one's freedom is to do disastrous things to them...if they believe they are fighting for a cause they believe is more important than themselves.

I'm presuming much in this ....because this probably isn't anything about YOU and your experience...but there are others of us who understand where "OUTRAGE" takes over our lives and we feel we must do something about what we see going on.

If we trash those of us on our planet who see Peril facing...and confront it...then what are we let with down the road. Compromising Principles eats away at somes souls. And, those are the very voices that keep Civilization Alive... Imho...for what it's worth. Around this place, these days...it's worth SHIT! But, whatever. If we don't speak out...our very reason for being dies...whether it's popular that we exist or not.



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Response to struggle4progress (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 09:14 PM

28. Setec Astronomy

(anagram) Too Many Secrets!

I have no doubt he's suffering extreme psychological stress.

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Response to struggle4progress (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 09:44 PM

37. Well looks like if they cannot confine him to a cell they try to do it by house arrest, confinement

elsewhere. Pressure.

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Response to glinda (Reply #37)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 10:16 PM

39. It must suck to live in a mansion.

I mean, the horrors!

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Response to boppers (Reply #39)

Tue Jul 31, 2012, 11:55 PM

56. If you are pretty much confined anywhere it might be a bit stressful. Just sayin'.

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Response to struggle4progress (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2012, 10:23 PM

40. I think everyone is missing the big picture. This is the latest tactic of the G8/10 countries,

you know, the countries that control the world, to stifle and punish dissent.

1) Step one, get some rinky dink little country to make some trumped up criminal case
against someone who has shone some light on said rinky dink country's criminal activity.

2) Step 2 said rinky dink country asks G8 country to extradite person to face
charges where a second G8 country can ask for said person to be extradited
there.

Thus we have Assange extradited to Sweden who will hand him off to the US

And Paul Watson, under house arrest on an extradition request from Cost Rica,
which has been a CIA base since forever, Japan asks Costa Rica to extradite him
to Japan and Costa Rica says A OK big brother.

Bear in mind these are just charges an spurious ones at that. Neither Assange
nor Watson have been convicted of anything.

In Watson's case the charges were dropped twenty years ago and then
reopened by the new US friendly Costa Rican government !!!

Nothing at all suspicious about that !!

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Response to Monk06 (Reply #40)

Wed Aug 1, 2012, 03:48 PM

61. !!!




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Response to struggle4progress (Original post)

Tue Jul 31, 2012, 07:03 AM

45. Che Guevara he is not... n/t

 

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Response to struggle4progress (Original post)

Tue Jul 31, 2012, 12:40 PM

46. Read Ray McGovern for SAAII (Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sam_Adams_Award

http://archive.truthout.org/articles/by-author/external/Sam+Adams+Associates+for+Integrity+in+Intelligence

http://michaelmoore.com/words/mike-friends-blog/asylum-julian-assange-former-awardee-integrity

June 25th, 2012 7:24 PM

Asylum for Julian Assange -- Former Awardee for Integrity

By Ray McGovern (for Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence)


Holed up at the Ecuadorian embassy in London seeking political asylum sits Julian Assange, founder of WikiLeaks, who has been responsible for spreading more truth around than any single journalist in recent memory. This, basically, is why he has been labeled all manner of things, including a terrorist, by several senior U.S. officials and others with acute allergies to the ground truth revealed in the WikiLeaks disclosures.

And that, basically, is why the U.S. government has been lusting to get its hands on Assange and prosecute him, stretching the provisions of the Espionage Act of 1917 well beyond its breaking point. Assange faced imminent extradition from the U.K. to Sweden and, he feared (with ample justification), on to the U.S. to face the tender mercies of what has become of American justice. Ecuador has given him sanctuary, pending a decision on his request for asylum.

Not many are aware (because the corporate media, for some reason, missed it) that at a large press conference in London on October 15, 2010, Daniel Ellsberg presented Julian Assange with the 8th annual Award for Integrity from The Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence (SAAII). Last year's award was given, ex aequo, to former NSA official Thomas Drake and Jesselyn Radack, Director of National Security and Human Rights at the Government Accountability Project.

On Sunday, June 24, 2012, Sam Adams Associates delivered to the embassy of Ecuador in Washington a letter to the Hon. Nathalie Cely Suarez, Ambassadress of Ecuador to the United States, conveying an appeal to her government to approve Julian Assange's request for political asylum.

The letter is posted below, together with the texts of the following enclosures:

-The citation for the October 15, 2012 Integrity Award to Julian Assange;
-An Information Sheet about Sam Adams Associates (including a list of annual recipients);
-WikiLeaks and 9/11: What If? Op-ed in Los Angeles Times, October 15, 2010 (published just eight days before Assange received the SAAII award).

****

Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence

June 24, 2012

Hon. Nathalie Cely Suarez
Ambassadress of Ecuador to the United States of America


Dear Ms. Ambassadress:

This is an urgent request from Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence (SAAII) that the government of Ecuador grant political asylum to Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks.

By publishing on the WikiLeaks Website key material normally hidden from public view, Julian Assange has contributed immeasurably to real history at this time of unprecedented government secrecy and hunts after those who dare spread truth around. As you are no doubt aware, much good has come from WikiLeaks disclosures. The benefits run from the light they shine on manipulation of media, police, and intelligence forces and the atrocities of war, to the inspiration that helped catalyze the Arab spring in Tunisia and Egypt.

Two of our SAAII members have made a persuasive case that the seminal event of our times -- the attacks of September 11, 2001 -- might have been prevented had WikiLeaks been available to whistleblowers at the time. Coleen Rowley (an attorney with the FBI) and Bogdan Dzakovic of the Federal Aviation Administration, in a little-noticed Los Angeles Times op-ed of October 15, 2010, make that sad but telling point. The authors write that FBI and FAA agents, frustrated by their ossified bureaucracies, might well have used WikiLeaks to make public their anxious warnings about missed opportunities for investigation, and serious vulnerabilities at airports to impending attack.

Digesting the WikiLeaks disclosures at a time when so-called "mainstream" media have largely abdicated their watchdog role as the Fourth Estate, and knowing first-hand the courage it took on Julian Assange's and WikiLeaks' part to expose the dishonesty and crimes of the powerful, the SAAII nominating committee selected Julian Assange for our annual award for integrity in 2010. SAAII member Daniel Ellsberg presented the award to him in London on October 15, 2010.

Except for Julian Assange, only one of the other nine annual award recipients to date was imprisoned as a result of disclosures -- in this case, about bogus intelligence before the attack on Iraq in 2003. He is Danish Army Major Frank Grevil, an intelligence analyst who was jailed for giving the Danish press documents showing that then-Denmark's Prime Minister Anders Fogh Rasmussen disregarded Danish intelligence warnings that there was no authentic evidence of WMD in Iraq. Aping former-Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld just before the war, Rasmussen declared: "Iraq has WMDs. It is not something we think; it is something we know." (Yes, this is the same Rasmussen who is now Secretary General of NATO.)

That Dane was performing tricks taught by Washington. Truth-teller Grevil blew the whistle and paid the price. It appears that the U.S. expects President Correa to roll over in a similar way. This could be seen in a long editorial on June 20 in the Establishment's mouthpiece, the Washington Post. The editors made an undisguised threat of serious economic retaliation: "If Mr. Correa seeks to appoint himself America's chief Latin American enemy and Julian Assange's protector , it's not hard to imagine the outcome."

It is an open secret that Establishment Washington is lusting to get Julian Assange to the U.S. and try him for espionage, no less. What a wonderful boon that would be for the re-election prospects of President Barack Obama, who is trying hard to appear tough. First taking out Osama bin-Laden -- and now Julian Assange! An automatic four more years, is the way White House strategists would see it. And, if he were sent to Sweden, there is every reason to expect the Swedes, based on recent past performance, to hand him over to Washington.

Little attention has been given to Assange's repeated offers to make himself available for questioning during almost five weeks in Sweden and at the Swedish embassy in London and Scotland Yard under conditions foreseen and set down for such cases in a treaty between Sweden and the UK.

We believe it reasonable to assume that Assange would similarly be willing to submit himself to such questioning at your embassy in London. Why the Swedes have resisted questioning him, either in Sweden or in London, but rather insisted he be extradited, before even being questioned, much less charged, feeds suspicion that they are dancing to Washington's baton.

For many of us, Monsenor Romero put it correctly in reminding us to speak out for Justice: "Ser cristiano hoy en dia significa no temer, no callar por miedo."

And so we choose not to remain silent. We are convinced not only that your President and his advisers will know the right thing to do, but that they will have the courage to do it.

Thank you for your help in passing this along to your government.

Respectfully,

/s/
Raymond L. McGovern (for Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence)

Enclosures:
-SAAII citation for 2010 integrity award to Julian Assange
-WikiLeaks and 9/11: What if? Los Angeles Times, October 15, 2010
-Information Sheet: Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence (with list of annual recipients)

ENCLOSURE A
Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence Award for 2010 to Julian Assange and WikiLeaks


It seems altogether fitting and proper that this year's award be presented in London, where Edmund Burke coined the expression "Fourth Estate." Comparing the function of the press to that of the three Houses then in Parliament, Burke said: "... but in the Reporters Gallery yonder, there sits a Fourth Estate more important far than they all."

The year was 1787 -- the year the U.S. Constitution was adopted. The First Amendment, approved four years later, aimed at ensuring that the press would be free of government interference. That was then.

With the Fourth Estate now on life support, there is a high premium on the fledgling Fifth Estate, which uses the ether and is not susceptible of government or corporation control. Small wonder that governments with lots to hide feel very threatened.

It has been said: "You shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free." WikiLeaks is helping make that possible by publishing documents that do not lie.

Last spring, when we chose WikiLeaks and Julian Assange for this award, Julian said he would accept only "on behalf or our sources, without which WikiLeaks' contributions are of no significance."

We do not know if Pvt. Bradley Manning gave WikiLeaks the gun-barrel video of July 12, 2007 called "Collateral Murder." Whoever did provide that graphic footage, showing the brutality of the celebrated "surge" in Iraq, was certainly far more a patriot than the "mainstream" journalist embedded in that same Army unit. He suppressed what happened in Baghdad that day, dismissed it as simply "one bad day in a surge that was filled with such days," and then had the temerity to lavish praise on the unit in a book he called "The Good Soldiers."

Julian is right to emphasize that the world is deeply indebted to patriotic truth-tellers like the sources who provided the gun-barrel footage and the many documents on Afghanistan and Iraq to WikiLeaks. We hope to have a chance to honor them in person in the future.

Today we honor WikiLeaks and one of its leaders, Julian Assange, for their ingenuity in creating a new highway by which important documentary evidence can make its way, quickly and confidentially, through the ether and into our in-boxes. Long live the Fifth Estate!

Presented this 23rd day of October 2010 in London, England by admirers of the example set by former CIA analyst, Sam Adams.

ENCLOSURE B
Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence


Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence is a movement of former CIA colleagues and other associates of former intelligence analyst Sam Adams, who hold up his example as a model for those in intelligence who would aspire to the courage to speak truth to power. In honoring his memory, SAAII confers an award each year to a person exemplifying Sam Adam's courage, persistence, and devotion to truth -- no matter the consequences.

It was Adams who discovered in 1967 that there were more than a half-million Vietnamese Communists under arms -- roughly twice the number that the U.S. command in Saigon would admit to, lest Americans learn that claims of "progress" were bogus. As proven later in court, Gen. William Westmoreland had put an artificial limit on the number Army intelligence was allowed to carry on its books. The reason? His deputy, Gen. Creighton Abrams put it down in writing -- letting the cat out of the bag.

A SECRET/EYES ONLY cable from Abrams on August 20, 1967 stated: "We have been projecting an image of success over recent months," and cautioned that if the higher figures became public, "all available caveats and explanations will not prevent the press from drawing an erroneous and gloomy conclusion."

The Communist countrywide offensive during Tet (January/February 1968) made it clear that the generals had been lying and that Sam Adams' higher figures were correct. Senior intelligence officials were aware of the deception, but lacked the courage to stand up to Westmoreland. Still, Sam remained reluctant to go "outside channels."

A few weeks after Tet, however, Daniel Ellsberg rose to the occasion. Dan learned that Westmoreland was asking for 206,000 more troops to widen the war into Cambodia, Laos, and North Vietnam -- right up to the border with China, and perhaps beyond. Someone else promptly leaked to the New York Times Westmoreland's troop request, emboldening Ellsberg to do likewise with Sam Adams' story. Dan had come to the view that leaking truth about a deceitful war would be a "patriotic and constructive act." It was his first unauthorized disclosure. On March 19, 1968 the Times published a stinging story based on Adams' figures.

On March 25, President Johnson complained to a small gathering, "The leaks to the New York Times hurt us...We have no support for the war. This is caused by the 206,000 troop request and the leaks. I would have given Westy the 206,000 men." On March 31, 1968, Johnson introduced a bombing pause, opted for negotiations, and announced that he would not run for another term in November.

Sam Adams continued to press for honesty but stayed "inside channels," and failed. He died at 55 of a heart attack, nagged by the thought that, had he gone to the media, thousands of lives might have been saved. His story is told in War of Numbers, published posthumously.

The annual Sam Adams Award has been given in previous years to truth-tellers Coleen Rowley of the FBI; Katharine Gun of British Intelligence; Sibel Edmonds of the FBI; Craig Murray, former UK ambassador to Uzbekistan; Sam Provance; former US Army Sgt; Maj. Frank Grevil of Danish Army Intelligence; Larry Wilkerson, Col., US Army (ret.), former chief of staff to Colin Powell at State; Julian Assange, of WikiLeaks; and (ex aequo) to Thomas Drake former senior official of NSA, and Jesselyn Radack, Director of National Security and Human Rights, Government Accountability Project.

ENCLOSURE C

October 15, 2010
Author: Coleen Rowley, Bogdan Dzakovic
Source: Los Angeles Times

Category: COMMENTARY
WikiLeaks and 9/11: What If?


If WikiLeaks had been around in 2001, could the events of 9/11 have been prevented? The idea is worth considering.

The organization has drawn both high praise and searing criticism for its mission of publishing leaked documents without revealing their source, but we suspect the world hasn't yet fully seen its potential. Let us explain.

<...>

Looking back, Dzakovic believes that if WikiLeaks had existed at the time, he would have gone to it as a last resort to highlight what he knew were serious vulnerabilities that were being ignored.

The 9/11 Commission concluded, correctly in our opinion, that the failure to share information within and between government agencies -- and with the media and the public -- led to an overall failure to "connect the dots."

Many government careerists are risk-averse. They avoid making waves and, when calamity strikes, are more concerned with protecting themselves than with figuring out what went wrong and correcting it.

Decisions to speak out inside or outside one's chain of command -- let alone to be seen as a whistle-blower or leaker of information -- is fraught with ethical and legal questions and can never be undertaken lightly. But there are times when it must be considered. Official channels for whistle-blower protections have long proved illusory. In the past, some government employees have gone to the media, but that can't be done fully anonymously, and it also puts reporters at risk of being sent to jail for refusing to reveal their sources. For all of these reasons, WikiLeaks provides a crucial safety valve.

***
Coleen Rowley, a FBI special agent for more than 20 years, was legal counsel to the FBI field office in Minneapolis from 1990 to 2003. Bogdan Dzakovic was a special agent for the FAA's security division. He filed a formal whistle-blower disclosure against the FAA for ignoring the vulnerabilities documented by the Red Team. For the past nine years he has been relegated to entry-level staff work for the Transportation Security Administration.

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Response to struggle4progress (Original post)

Tue Jul 31, 2012, 12:46 PM

47. Guardian UK: 'Prominent Americans urge Ecuador to accept Julian Assange's asylum request.'

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2012/jun/26/ecuador-julian-assange-asylum

Prominent Americans urge Ecuador to accept Julian Assange's asylum request

Michael Moore, Oliver Stone and Noam Chomsky among signatories to letter delivered to Ecuador's embassy in London

By Ben Quinn
guardian.co.uk, Monday 25 June 2012 20.14 EDT


A letter signed by leading US figures in support of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange's application for political asylum in Ecuador has been delivered to the country's London embassy.

Among those who signed the letter were Michael Moore, Oliver Stone, Noam Chomsky and Danny Glover.

Other signatories included the author Naomi Wolf, comedian Bill Maher and Daniel Ellsberg, the former US military analyst turned whistleblower, who leaked the Pentagon Papers in 1971 and has been a long-standing supporter of Assange.

Robert Naiman, policy director at the Just Foreign Policy campaign group, delivered the letter to the embassy on Monday, along with a petition signed by more than four thousand Americans urging President Rafael Correa to approve Assange's request for asylum.

<...>

LETTER (different from SAAII letter above): http://www.justforeignpolicy.org/node/1257

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Response to struggle4progress (Original post)

Wed Aug 1, 2012, 02:31 PM

60. I think your commentary is a bit simplistic

I'm not quite sure how the courts would even begin to make a judgement on this.

Only two people will ever know if the conversation about protection ever happened.

Also this "First, he's set up by a Swedish woman who forces him to sex with him while she's unconscious!" is really less then accurate in the telling. They were sleeping naked together after being intimate and he initiated sex with her before she was fully awake. He didn't come upon her unconscious body and raped her as your sentence portrays.

I think the whole thing is a mess, the line is so fine in the charges, that we will probably never know what happened.

I do think he needs to go to Sweden and answer the charges, but I also understand why he might feel he wouldn't be getting a fair trial.

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Response to Marrah_G (Reply #60)

Wed Aug 1, 2012, 05:32 PM

62. It's not my task to decide whether the Swedish investigation would lead to prosecution, or

(if the investigation led to prosecution) whether Assange would win or lose the case

The fact is that the Swedish authorities began proceedings against him and that he fled the country while the authorities were negotiating with his lawyer to schedule an interview

He had come to Sweden, where some of his servers were located, in the hopes of moving there, and had even submitted a residency application

But when his sexual activities resulted in women asking the authorities whether there would be any way to force him to get an AIDS test for nonconsensual (because unprotected) sex, he skipped over to England and initially confessed charmingly to his own sexual chauvinism and complained of Sweden's "revolutionary feminists"

His story changed with time: eventually it became a dark tale of Sweden's medieval dungeons, Sweden's thralldom to American overlords, the likelihood that extradition to Sweden was a mere cover for extradition to the US, and the intent of the CIA to hustle him into Guantanamo for torture or execution

None of these claims comports with the facts, and in fact he argued none of the claims in the UK courts, because he would have been laughed to scorn if he had. The Swedish courts are as well-insulated from political interference as any Western courts, the barriers being built into the Swedish constitution. Groundless prosecution is a crime in Sweden, and the victims of crimes in Sweden have some rights towards the prosecution of their own cases. The European treaties governing successive extraditions would require the UK to sign off on an extradition from Sweden to the US, and Assange in that case would have recourse to courts in both Sweden and the UK appealing it, so that sending Assange to the US from Sweden would be even harder than simply sending him to the US from the UK -- in addition to which we should add, that the UK was much more closely connected to the Bush-era rendition program and "war on terror" than Sweden ever was

By skipping bail and fleeing to the embassy, Assange also distracted attention from the fact that he had failed to file any appeal of the UK court decision with the European court in Strasbourg. Why did he skip that appeal? The natural guess is that he really had nothing to offer there

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Response to struggle4progress (Original post)

Sun Aug 5, 2012, 10:34 PM

63. OMG, this is a hard one. Petition 'created by Daniel Ellsberg' to President Obama.

http://warisacrime.org/content/sign-daniel-ellsbergs-petition-free-bradley-manning

August 1, 2012
Sign Daniel Ellsberg’s petition to free Bradley Manning


Pentagon Papers whistle-blower Daniel Ellsberg, the Center for Constitutional Rights, and the Bradley Manning Support Network call on you to sign our petition to free Bradley Manning.



Pentagon Papers whistle-blower Daniel Ellsberg asks you to sign this petition to free Bradley Manning.



Petition link: http://www.avaaz.org/en/petition/Save_human_rights_whistleblower_Bradley_Manning/?cCTAqdb

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Response to proverbialwisdom (Reply #63)

Sun Aug 5, 2012, 11:26 PM

64. The nomination of Manning for a Nobel Peace Prize is hilarious! the Nobel bequest states

the prize should go to whoever shall have done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses. Manning's contribution to "fraternity between nations" seems to be nil; what he seems to have done appears rather analogous to widespread petty vandalism; and his work towards "the abolition or reduction of standing armies" is limited to getting himself removed, from a country we were already leaving, and thence getting himself thrown into the brig.

Of course, Manning's nomination for the Peace Prize is the work of Icelandic member of parliament Birgitta Jónsdóttir. Birgitta Jónsdóttir has recently been outraged that the US government sought access to her Twitter account:

... Before my Twitter case, in which the US Department of Justice has demanded that the social media site hands over personal information about my account which it deems necessary to its investigation of WikiLeaks, I didn't think much about what rights I would be signing off when accepting user agreement in my computer. The text is usually lengthy, in a legal language that most people don't understand. Very few people read the user agreements, and very few understand their legal implications if someone in the real world would try to use one against them ...
How the US Justice Department legally hacked my Twitter account
Few realise that foreign governments gain the right to our personal data when we sign up to social media. This must end

Birgitta Jónsdóttir
guardian.co.uk, Friday 11 November 2011 13.34 EST
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cifamerica/2011/nov/11/us-justice-department-legally-hacked-twitter

Now I generally support privacy rights, but there's a certain irony to Jónsdóttir's complaint: she was an active Wikileaks volunteer, who helped to produce the Collateral Murder video. And neither do I actually have any real objection to the release of the Collateral Murder material. But it seems to be part and parcel of a huge 750 000 page leak of documents, some sensitive, allegedly by Manning through Wikileaks. If Jónsdóttir believes other people's documents should freely available, on transparency grounds, then perhaps everybody else should be able to see her documents, too: after all, she is a member of the Icelandic parliament, and surely people would like to know if she's part of a gigantic espionage ring

In any case, since Birgitta Jónsdóttir seems to be connected to Manning's releases, her nomination of him for the Nobel Peace Prize lacks objectivity -- and on those grounds alone, we can expect that nomination to land in the circular file

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Response to struggle4progress (Original post)

Mon Aug 6, 2012, 12:09 PM

65. Please provide a link...

...for your statement "who forces him to sex with him while she's unconscious". I have never, n.e.v.e.r. seen such an allegation in regard to this case.

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Response to ljm2002 (Reply #65)

Mon Aug 6, 2012, 01:13 PM

66. ... Mr Assange regards himself as a victim of radicalism. "Sweden is the Saudi Arabia of feminism,"

he said. "I fell into a hornets' nest of revolutionary feminism" ...

WikiLeaks founder baffled by sex assault claims
BY: MARIE COLVIN
From: The Sunday Times December 27, 2010 12:00AM
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/in-depth/wikileaks/wikileaks-founder-baffled-by-sex-assault-claims/story-fn775xjq-1225976459286



So there is Truth as we knew it in late 2010: dear, dear Julian victimized by radical feminists. Later, Assange's defense team was actually able to exhibit witnesses who had heard rumors that the Swedish prosecutor was prejudiced against men!

The prosecutor leading the rape and sexual assault case against Julian Assange is a "malicious" radical feminist who is "biased against men", a retired senior Swedish judge has told the hearing into Assange's extradition to Sweden. In caustic evidence on the first day of the two-day hearing, Brita Sundberg-Weitman, a former appeal court judge, told Belmarsh magistrates court that Sweden's chief prosecutor, Marianne Ny, who is seeking the WikiLeaks founder's extradition, "has a rather biased view against men". "I can't understand her attitude here. It looks malicious," she said ... Under cross-examination by Clare Montgomery QC, for the Swedish government, however, Sundberg-Weitman admitted she had no personal knowledge of the conduct of the prosecutor in the case, basing her views instead on what she had been told ...

Julian Assange 'would face bias in Sweden', retired judge says
Sundberg-Weitman accuses Swedish prosecutor of being 'malicious', but admits she has no personal knowledge of her
Esther Addley
Monday 7 February 2011 14.41 EST
http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011/feb/07/julian-assange-prosecutor



And what else could account for the rape accusation? Assange's lawyers did try hard to explain in the UK courts, that having sex with a woman who is unconscious should not be considered rape, but the magistrate corruptly refused to agree:

... The position with offence 4 is different. This is an allegation of rape. The framework list is ticked for rape. The defence accepts that normally the ticking of a framework list offence box on an EAW would require very little analysis by the court. However they then developed a sophisticated argument that the conduct alleged here would not amount to rape in most European countries. However, what is alleged here is that Mr Assange “deliberately consummated sexual intercourse with her by improperly exploiting that she, due to sleep, was in a helpless state”. In this country that would amount to rape ...

City of Westminster Magistrates’ Court (Sitting at Belmarsh Magistrates’ Court)
The judicial authority in Sweden -v- Julian Paul Assange
Findings of facts and reasons




This all clearly proves CIA involvement, as helpfully pointed out by Israel Shamir in Counterpunch:

... One accuser, Anna Ardin, may have “ties to the US-financed anti-Castro and anti-communist groups,” according to Israel Shamir and Paul Bennett, writing for CounterPunch. While in Cuba, Ardin worked with the Las damas de blanco (the Ladies in White), a feminist anti-Castro group. Professor Michael Seltzer pointed out that the group is led by Carlos Alberto Montaner who is reportedly connected to the CIA ... Shamir and Bennett noted that Las damas de blanco is partially funded by the US government and also counts Luis Posada Carriles as a supporter ...

Revealed: Assange ‘rape’ accuser linked to notorious CIA operative
By David Edwards
Monday, December 6, 2010 15:43 EDT
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2010/12/06/assange-rape-accuser-cia-ties/



That should, of course, clinch the matter: one of Assange's accusers allegedly once met some anti-Castro feminists who are led by some guy reportedly connected to the CIA, and some other CIA guy agrees with what those anti-Castro feminists are doing! So it's a honey trap, involving the revolutionary feminists of the CIA! But since some people are cynical, let us carefully lay out the impeccable credentials of Israel Shamir:

In an interview with a Swedish Holocaust-denying creationist and Islamist named Mohamed Omar, headlined "The Holocaust is an idol", Shamir says: "Antisemitism is an invented concept without any real meaning. I don't believe antisemitism exists at all ..."

His latest book, in Russian, is called is called How to Break the Conspiracy of the Elders of Zion.

His son, Wahlström, ... has been employed in various journalistic capacities by the Swedish state broadcaster, SVT, by the newspaper Aftonbladet, and by the leftwing magazine Ordfront. The magazine was forced to retract and to apologise for a story he wrote in 2005 about supposed Israeli control of the Swedish media, which contained quotes attributed to three other journalists, which they denied ever making. None the less, Aftonbladet is paying him both as a researcher and a consultant, because he has exclusive access to the WikiLeaks cable dump in Sweden and is the gatekeeper who doles out stories to favoured media partners ...

<Shamir> also denied that he had any special connection with WikiLeaks, though the group's spokesman, Kristinn Hrafnsson, confirmed that he was their representative in Russia, just as his son is in Scandinavia. Expressen also published a photograph of him standing behind Julian Assange at a computer, published in the Russian paper, which has been reprinting the WikiLeaks cables he passed to them ...

WikiLeaks and Israel Shamir
WikiLeaks is represented in Russia and Scandinavia by a father and son team with a disturbing record of antisemitism

Comment is free > Andrew Brown's blog
<17 December 2010>
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/andrewbrown/2010/dec/17/wikileaks-israel-shamir-russia-scandinavia



In that article, Andrew Brown goes on to wring his hands and suggest that, because of Shamir's questionable background, we should be concerned for anybody named in the cables. And in fact, not long afterwards, Shamir apparently met with the authorities in Belarus, after which the state newspaper announced it was planning to publish documents related to the Belarusian opposition!

It has been reported that an “accredited” journalist for Wikileaks, Israel Shamir, met with Uladzimri Makei, the Head of the Presidential administration in Belarus. Subsequently, it was reported in the Belarus Telegraf that a state newspaper would be publishing documents about the Belarusian opposition.

Wikileaks has always maintained it takes care to ensure that names of political activists are redacted from cables before publication on its website. Index on Censorship is concerned that some of the Wikileaks cables relating to Belarus that have not appeared on the main Wikileaks website are now in the public domain.

There are various “commercial crimes” in Belarus that make it a criminal offence to run an unregistered organisation. In turn, many NGOs are prohibited from registering their organisations. This places a lot of civil society in Belarus in a legal grey area which can mean political activists, who cannot register, are placed in breach of the law for accepting foreign funding. It is rumoured in Belarus that many of the Wikileaks cables outline foreign support for opposition groups. Our worry is that this information could be used to prosecute some of the political prisoners currently held by the KGB.

In the immediate aftermath of the discredited Belarusian elections, Index on Censorship made repeated attempts to contact Wikileaks in order for them to clarify its relationship with Shamir ...

WIKILEAKS, BELARUS AND ISRAEL SHAMIR
05 Feb 2011
http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2011/02/wikileaks-belarus-and-israel-shamir/



We must open our eyes, because radical feminist CIA agents are obviously everywhere! They have tried to discredit dear Julian, and now they are trying to discredit Julian's friends, like Israel Shamir!

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Response to struggle4progress (Reply #66)

Mon Aug 6, 2012, 01:48 PM

67. I think I am starting to get your motivations

With all due respect to your research and your viewpoint, you do realize that many of the leaks exposed, or at least shed a little more light on, patriarchal abuses(ie US involvement in child sex-slavery in Afghanistan) around the world? These abuses are on a far greater scale than one alleged case against a single member of a whistle-blowing organization. I am not saying that makes it right, I just wish the results of the wikileaks scandal would have been more dialogue about these international issues. Instead the media and public is really focused on Assange and everything else seems to have been, not just forgotten, but not even ever been part of public discourse.

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