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Tue Jan 3, 2012, 03:33 PM

US Manufacturing Jumps to Six-Month High

The Journal of Commerce Online - News Story


Joseph Bonney, Senior Editor | Jan 3, 2012 3:52PM GMT

Similar indices of international production show improvement

A closely watched gauge of U.S. manufacturing activity rose in December, indicating the 29th consecutive month of expansion, and similar indexes showed improvement in China, India, the U.K., Switzerland and Australia.

The Institute of Supply Management said its purchasing managers’ index of U.S. manufacturing activity registered 53.9, up from 52.7 in November. Readings above 50 indicate expansion.

<snip>

The survey’s inventories index registered 47.1 percent in December, down from 48.3 in November. An inventories index above 42.7 generally indicates expansion.

“Manufacturing is finishing out the year on a positive note, with new orders, production and employment all growing in December at faster rates than in November, and with an optimistic view toward the beginning of 2012,” said Bradley J. Holcomb, chair of ISM’s manufacturing business survey committee.


More at: http://www.joc.com/economy/manufacturing-indices-rise-globally

It's going to be all GOP talking points about the failed economy from here to November, so let's counter some tea-bag crap. I'm thinking some of us might want to post Facebook status updates, whattaya think?

41 replies, 6078 views

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Arrow 41 replies Author Time Post
Reply US Manufacturing Jumps to Six-Month High (Original post)
Richardo Jan 2012 OP
msongs Jan 2012 #1
zipplewrath Jan 2012 #2
IthinkThereforeIAM Jan 2012 #3
madrchsod Jan 2012 #4
merkozy Jan 2012 #5
dmallind Jan 2012 #6
dmallind Jan 2012 #7
Kolesar Jan 2012 #8
Surya Gayatri Jan 2012 #14
RBInMaine Jan 2012 #11
chervilant Jan 2012 #13
Kolesar Jan 2012 #15
chervilant Jan 2012 #16
girl gone mad Jan 2012 #24
Kolesar Jan 2012 #25
girl gone mad Jan 2012 #35
chervilant Jan 2012 #34
Kolesar Jan 2012 #36
chervilant Jan 2012 #40
dmallind Jan 2012 #29
chervilant Jan 2012 #32
dmallind Jan 2012 #33
bigwillq Jan 2012 #9
liberal N proud Jan 2012 #10
Deep13 Jan 2012 #12
Richardo Jan 2012 #17
Deep13 Jan 2012 #18
boppers Jan 2012 #37
Deep13 Jan 2012 #39
boppers Jan 2012 #41
JDPriestly Jan 2012 #19
BadtotheboneBob Jan 2012 #21
JDPriestly Jan 2012 #22
Kolesar Jan 2012 #26
JDPriestly Jan 2012 #27
hack89 Jan 2012 #31
dmallind Jan 2012 #30
Yo_Mama_Been_Loggin Jan 2012 #20
90-percent Jan 2012 #23
Kolesar Jan 2012 #28
Gringostan Jan 2012 #38

Response to Richardo (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 03:36 PM

1. good news if it holds up nt

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Response to msongs (Reply #1)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 04:03 PM

2. The last quarter

There has been a slow, quiet, drip of good numbers/news in the last quarter. Nothing huge, and all of it "tenuous". But if you look at a large number of common indicators they are all moving very slowly in the "right" direction. Dunno if it will last, or if "all" the numbers will move, but it is some of the best we've seen in 3 or more years.

Europe could ruin it all if they don't get their act together though.

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Response to zipplewrath (Reply #2)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 04:29 PM

3. Or the GOP could ruin it...


... just like they did with the ruination of the U.S. of A.'s credit rating, you know, they do those kind of things just for shits and giggles.

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Response to Richardo (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 04:29 PM

4. it`s actually picking up a bit where i live BUT...

there has to be at least 2000 jobs to break even for the last 6-7 yrs.

we have lost at least 20,000 good paying permanent union jobs in the last 30 yrs. we used to be one of the largest producers of nuts and bolts,stamped steel hardware,several other large manufacturing plants,and a steel mill with the largest melt furnaces in the usa. our steel and it`s products built this country and the only thing that is left is the melt furnaces and one rolling mill and the rest are empty buildings and level land.

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Response to Richardo (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 04:40 PM

5. YET AGAIN, CONFESSIONS OF A TORTURED STATISTIC

Some wise man once said “Statistics are like a bikini. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” Add to that those persistent rumours that if you torture statistics long enough it will eventually confess to something, and you have a potent mix on your hands. Not for the first time, we have seen some innocuous set of numbers scoured and pored over in excruciating detail, until at least some crumbs of comfort could be rescued from the grim rubble. For the numbers this is an extremely frustrating ordeal. All they want is to be allowed to tell it like it is: you lot dunno what’ya doing. But then who cares about the unleavened truth when sheer romantic escapism presents a far more appealing picture? Without a doubt this economic crisis is the ultimate homage to St Jude, the patron saint of lost causes. I have closely followed these recovery tales- and I have the entire list of news stories to prove it - since May 2009, which means we're entering the third year of recovery! Some recovery this.

http://www.maverickonomics.com

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Response to merkozy (Reply #5)


Response to merkozy (Reply #5)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 04:48 PM

7. but all numbers do tell the story of a very slow but actual recovery

from job losses beconing gains to consumer confidence to durable goods orders to inventories to profits to equity markets to tax revenues to retail sales - all slow but real improvements over the last 18 mos at least. Improving and wonderful are not synonyms.

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Response to merkozy (Reply #5)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 06:15 PM

8. It's only an index

Don't blow a blood vessel over it

And welcome to the forum!

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Response to Kolesar (Reply #8)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 09:10 PM

14. LOL! Yeah, the long-winded

analysis did seem a bit of an over-reaction to a few statistics!

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Response to merkozy (Reply #5)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 07:20 PM

11. So even somewhat good news is bad news to you? Please, take an anti-depressant.

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Response to merkozy (Reply #5)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 08:02 PM

13. Too true...

And, I find it disheartening that so many of us lap up these 'economic recovery' red herrings.

The obscenely wealthy corporate megalomaniacs are scurrying around like cockroaches in the dawning light because their wealth is an illusion. Their hedonism has resulted in the massive Black Hole that the brave and erudite Brooksley Born called the Dark Market. With a current notional value of $680 TRILLION, the 'worth' of these worthless financial instruments exceeds the combined GNPs of EVERY NATION ON THIS PLANET by a factor of ten!

The entire system is broken! Our global economy is undergoing catastrophic change. I find it disheartening that our 'leaders' and 'economists' continue to discuss this issue as though there is a 'recovery' just around the corner.

We are witnessing a global cultural crisis, and some folks are just not ready to acknowledge that.

Time for change. I am ever more hopeful, now that #Occupy is spreading across the globe.

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Response to chervilant (Reply #13)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 09:25 PM

15. My employer had record earnings and I got a $8000 bonus this year

And my employer is a
Manufacturer!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Response to Kolesar (Reply #15)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 10:01 PM

16. How wonderful for you.

Our species' economic behavior continues unabated, even during times of extreme austerity. Your employer's 'record earnings' and your bonus do not insure that we are experiencing a 'recovery,' nor do the regular intimations of improved circumstances promulgated by various individuals with a vested interest in assuaging our fears.

Quite a number of corporatists will profit abundantly during the coming years of privation. However, the vast majority of us will not.

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Response to Kolesar (Reply #15)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 07:38 AM

24. So maybe try to keep a more open mind..

when responding to those who are being crushed by the greedy and self-interested who control our economic reins.

Clearly you cannot relate to them but bragging of your superior fortunes is in poor taste.

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Response to girl gone mad (Reply #24)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 09:02 AM

25. Merkozy isn't being crushed

I decline your invitation to the malaise-fest.

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Response to Kolesar (Reply #25)

Sat Jan 7, 2012, 09:18 PM

35. Actually...

German Factory Orders Drop Most in Nearly 3 Years

Bloomberg: German factory orders dropped the most in almost three years in November as the euro region economy edged toward a recession and global demand weakened.

Orders, adjusted for seasonal swings and inflation, slipped 4.8 percent from October, when they surged a revised 5 percent, the Economy Ministry in Berlin said in a statement today. That’s the biggest drop since January 2009. Economists forecast a decline of 1.8 percent, according to the median of 25 estimates in a Bloomberg News survey.

While the euro region’s sovereign debt crisis has clouded the outlook and cooling global growth is hurting export orders, Europe’s biggest economy may still avert a recession.

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Response to girl gone mad (Reply #24)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 05:49 PM

34. +a gazillion...

I was wondering how I would update my ignore list in this new DU, without toggling back and forth to insure I didn't miss anyone. Luckily, those who've been long absent from my view have apparently continued their contentious, sarcastic, rude, sexist, patronizing and/or condescending comments, which makes it so much easier for me to add them.

I got two on this OP alone...

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Response to chervilant (Reply #34)

Sun Jan 8, 2012, 05:36 AM

36. That suits me, lazy chair occupant...eom

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Response to Kolesar (Reply #36)

Sun Jan 8, 2012, 11:50 AM

40. Oh, noes...

Poor wee mannie, your posts are far too insipid to warrant ignore.

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Response to chervilant (Reply #13)

Thu Jan 5, 2012, 10:59 AM

29. Ah the 680T BS again..

Using the same math, if the Megamillions jackpot is $200mm and they sell 50mm tickets for Friday's drawing, the "notional value" is 10T, but that doesn't mean there is even a vague possibility of them needing to pay that. Almost ALL of that silly number is default swaps and options - essentially self-canceling bets for and against the same thing.

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Response to dmallind (Reply #29)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 12:51 AM

32. Really?

Do tell... Such erudition is most enlightening, particularly when unencumbered by references to the perspectives of such marginally gifted individuals as Brooksley Born. I genuflect in your general direction...

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Response to chervilant (Reply #32)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 11:55 AM

33. Argumentum ad verecundiam much? Let's start with the basics

Where's the money? If this silly amount is a real debt, what happened to the principal?

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Response to Richardo (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 06:20 PM

9. K and R (nt)

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Response to Richardo (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 07:13 PM

10. I told you the economy was better

But, Nooooo, everyone keeps listening to the media and their doomsday experts.


Really, this sounds like great news along with so many other signs, we need some optimism here!

We were in NYC over the weekend and they were not giving deep, deep discounts like they had in past years, my girls were disapointed they could not get $50 designers clothes.

Signs looks up!

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Response to Richardo (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 08:01 PM

12. Robots and cheap, foreign labor are raking in the profits...

...for the super rich.

American jobs? *chirp**chirp**chirp*

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Response to Deep13 (Reply #12)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 10:17 PM

17. "US Manufacturing"

Not a workers' paradise by any means, but a better trend than the other direction.

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Response to Richardo (Reply #17)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 11:50 PM

18. Yeah, US firms are making things.

That does not mean they are using American workers.

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Response to Deep13 (Reply #12)

Sun Jan 8, 2012, 06:25 AM

37. Want to replace a robot?

Be smarter than one.

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Response to boppers (Reply #37)

Sun Jan 8, 2012, 11:04 AM

39. You've got to be kidding me.

For repetitive tasks, there is no way for a human to outperform a robot. It's just not possible. Robots never fatigue and never make a mistake. For everything else, robots are used because they are cheaper than people, not because they are better. Is an automated telephone answering system really better than a live operator? Of course not. But it is cheaper.

You seem to be suggesting that if humans can't compete with robots, then we are obsolete and ought to be replaced.

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Response to Deep13 (Reply #39)

Sun Jan 8, 2012, 04:30 PM

41. That is exactly what I am suggesting.

If you have no more value than a machine, well....

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Response to Richardo (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 11:57 PM

19. What do we manufacture? Other than weapons?

I'm really happy to see this, but I'm always wondering what we manufacture since other than foods, a few gardening items (but not hardware) and sports clothing, I mostly only find foreign-made products in the stores I can afford to shop in.

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Response to JDPriestly (Reply #19)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 01:33 AM

21. Lots of things, actually. Big ticket items, mostly..

... such as commercial aircraft, construction equipment (Caterpillar - best in the world), agricultural equipment (Deere, Case), mining and oil equipment, machine tools, Um... cars, trucks, buses, appliances, railroad equipment, medical equipment, electrical equipment such as motors and turbines, plus chemicals, glass, concrete. The large item manufacterers do make things overseas, too, but for foreign markets mostly. I think it would be easier to get a job as a CNC (computer numerical control) machinist than it would as an MBA. Many companies are begging for skilled tradesmen. Engineers, too, of all disciplines. Far too many college students are not looking at degrees where the jobs are, or considering technical school for blue-collar type careers. How many jobs are there available in anthropology? Or, Literature? Or, history? If we are not willing to make things, then we have to buy them from elsewhere. That's not to say I don't recognize that US companies aren't shipping jobs elsewhere (thank you, NAFTA) or retailers bringing in inexpensive goods (Hello, Walmart etal). If our economy is to grow and thrive, we have to make things.

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Response to BadtotheboneBob (Reply #21)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 03:07 AM

22. Yes, we have to make things.

When we lived in Germany and Austria, I noticed that the children in those countries at that time learned things like knitting and playing little plastic recorders in our local, state-run three-year kindergarten.

In addition to abstract arithmetic and math, the children learned applied math of a very basic sort. If you can knit, you can count beyond ten, coordinate your hands and if you can play a little plastic recorder, you learn to think in abstract terms, you train your memory and again you have to work to coordinate your hands and your brain.

I don't know whether the German and Austrian kindergartens still teach these skills, but I'm pretty sure that we do not. Our children do crafts, but I don't know to what extent the crafts they do integrate pre-engineering or pre-math skills as do knitting and playing a simple musical instrument.

Also, it may be that our local kindergarten was unusual.

I think that these crafts help children learn to plan projects, focus and finish what they start. Kids have a lot of fun doing them. I don't see very many American kids doing these things. Of course, our kids used to play with Lego a lot. I don't know if children do that. Computer games can be good, but I don't see that they encourage children to integrate thinking and coordination of muscles that need to be used in making things. Computers seem relatively easy to use, not as challenging for children as skills like knitting or woodwork or playing a musical instrument.

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Response to JDPriestly (Reply #22)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 09:09 AM

26. Products made right here in Northeast Ohio

The skills for designing assembly lines and information technology to support manufacturing is quite prominent in Ohio.

http://www.ohio.com/business/products-made-right-here-in-northeast-ohio-1.108630

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Response to Kolesar (Reply #26)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 03:43 PM

27. In LA, we make a few things, but we mostly just unload ships from Asia and maybe

South and Central America. It's pretty depressing.

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Response to JDPriestly (Reply #27)

Thu Jan 5, 2012, 12:36 PM

31. Los Angles County is the top manufacturing center in America with 389,300 jobs

Manufacturing jobs in Los Angeles County have continued to decline in recent years, as they have nationwide, yet the county retains its ranking as the leading U.S. manufacturing center, a new report says.

L.A. County had 389,300 people employed in manufacturing in 2009, ahead of traditional rival Chicago, which ranked No. 2 with 324,900 jobs in the sector, according to the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp., a business advocacy group for the local economy.

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/money_co/2011/03/los-angeles-la-county-top-manufacturing-center-us.html

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Response to JDPriestly (Reply #19)

Thu Jan 5, 2012, 11:04 AM

30. Weapons are less than 1% of US exports

Those products you see made in China? Chances are they were made with American machines in factories built with American construction equipment and operating American software by workers fed on American grains and legumes. Consumer products with country of origin stamps do not tell the whole story.

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Response to Richardo (Original post)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 12:20 AM

20. But that can't happen.

How else are the Republicans going to win?

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Response to Richardo (Original post)

Wed Jan 4, 2012, 07:00 AM

23. Machine Tools

I spent 32 years so far involved in the machine tool business, mostly as a CNC Applications Engineer. My last employer, Mazak USA, laid me off in a panic in Feb 2009, along with a lot of other people, experienced it's best sales year in U.S. history in 2011. The U.S.A. had been buying Mazak's, and presumably other machine tools, like hotcakes in 2011.

Big ticket capital equipment has enjoyed a lot of prosperity in the last two years. I don't have a good explanation as to why this business segment is prospering, while most of America is suffering, either laid off or in fear of losing their job. Some possible reasons are excellent capital equipment tax incentives, and perhaps a lot of military work out there?

Here's some industry graphs to study:

http://www.amtda.org/website/article.asp?id=492

I do currently have a job, but it's in direct labor now. Running Mazak's, of course.

-90% Jimmy

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Response to 90-percent (Reply #23)

Thu Jan 5, 2012, 05:40 AM

28. Mining and resource extraction is strong

That is driving heavy equipment and plant construction.

Your amtda last graph shows machine tools up to 1990s levels--very good news.

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Response to Richardo (Original post)

Sun Jan 8, 2012, 06:39 AM

38. The true American people…

Build it, declare it, and we will buy it! The true American people…

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