HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » Teach For America is Prou...

Sun Jun 17, 2012, 11:42 AM

Teach For America is Proud to Partner with J.P. Morgan

http://cms.tfaweb.org/after-the-corps/employer-partnerships/jp-morgan

Teach For America is Proud to Partner with J.P. Morgan

Joining Teach For America before pursuing a career in business will provide you with the management experience and skills that will help you have a greater impact in the business world. By committing two years to teach in a low-income community, you will have an unparalleled opportunity to assume tremendous responsibility—managing a classroom of students, setting ambitious goals, and inspiring your students to meet those goals. Through this experience, alumni say that they developed invaluable communication and time-management skills that are highly transferable to a career in business.

Partnership Benefits
• Two-year deferrals for students who are accepted into both Teach For America and J.P. Morgan's Investment Bank Analyst Program.
• J.P. Morgan mentor for corps members during their two-year corps experience.
• Summer internship at J.P. Morgan between first and second year of corps experience for those who participate in the deferral partnership.
• J.P. Morgan recruits Teach For America corps members for summer internship opportunities. (J.P. Morgan will treat Teach For America as a 'core recruiting school').

more...

5 replies, 1377 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 5 replies Author Time Post
Reply Teach For America is Proud to Partner with J.P. Morgan (Original post)
Karmadillo Jun 2012 OP
patrice Jun 2012 #1
snot Jun 2012 #2
Igel Jun 2012 #4
snot Jun 2012 #5
woo me with science Jun 2012 #3

Response to Karmadillo (Original post)

Sun Jun 17, 2012, 12:11 PM

1. More ELITES. Wish I could be positive about this sort of thing, but I've seen too much mediocrity in

the corporate world, what Christopher Hays calls "the elites" in the current issue of The Nation, to be hopeful about what this sort of thing will produce:

http://www.thenation.com/article/168265/why-elites-fail

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Karmadillo (Original post)

Sun Jun 17, 2012, 12:59 PM

2. "A modern economic system demands

mass production of students who are not educated and have been rendered incapable of thinking."
– U.N.E.F. Strasbourg, On the Poverty of Student Life (1966).

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to snot (Reply #2)

Sun Jun 17, 2012, 05:18 PM

4. For context

"Once upon a time the universities were respected; the student persists in the belief that he is lucky to be there. But he arrived too late. The bygone excellence of bourgeois culture (By this we mean the culture of a Hegel or of the encyclopédistes, rather than the Sorbonne and the Ecole Normale Supérieure.) has vanished. A mechanically produced specialist is now the goal of the "educational system." A modern economic system demands mass production of students who are not educated and have been rendered incapable of thinking. Hence the decline of the universities and the automatic nullity of the student once he enters its portals. The university has become a society for the propagation of ignorance; "high culture" has taken on the rhythm of the production line; without exception, university teachers are cretins, men who would get the bird from any audience of schoolboys. But all this hardly matters: the important thing is to go on listening respectfully. In time, if critical thinking is repressed with enough conscientiousness, the student will come to partake of the wafer of knowledge, the professor will tell him the final truths of the world. Till then--a menopause of the spirit. As a matter of course the future revolutionary society will condemn the doings of lecture theatre and faculty as mere noise--socially undesirable. The student is already a very bad joke."

This is, of course, from 1968, meaning that I assume you believe this to be true of all those who attended school in the '60s--and that it's more true of students from the '70s and later.

Of course, I assume that the nullity that one student became somehow was multiplied in order to become a cretin of a university professor. This would be, of course, Obama. How, exactly, multiplying a nullity gets you > 0 is a bit of a problem. And why it's a good thing to think that the necessary outcome of a prestigious school education is a nullity of a cretin that we can back for president seems to elude me. Then again, I attended college after the Strasbourgians decreed themselves the acme of intellectual thought for the remainder of the millennium.

The problem is that this is a manifesto, a literary genre that's pretty much lost--and never widespread in the US. Like A Slap in the Face of Public Taste (http://www.unknown.nu/futurism/slap.html) it is not so much a fact-based assertion as a vaunting of ego and assertion of supremacy coupled with a claim on obeisance. Khlebnikov and others who wrote that "We alone are the face of our Time. Through us the horn of time blows in the art of the world" as an act of impudence. Similar screeds were commonplaces, the dedicated puffery of a disenchanted error, a kind of extramural match between world-class teams of well-trained effetes wearing their team colors. We like to ignore their affrontery to us because that would make our views into satire aimed against ourselves. Such affrontery can only be applied to those we don't like: We are, vicariously, Strasbourgians even though they'd spit on us because, well, we don't want to admit that our umbrellas aren't out to protect us from rain but from 44-year-old saliva.

At least Khlebnikov understood that brevity was the soul of wit. T'is too true, as the Strasbourgian students all too amply demonstrated. As for me, I prefer my motley, crew.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Igel (Reply #4)

Mon Jun 18, 2012, 12:46 AM

5. I didn't mean to identify any particular individuals as mis-educated;

I just like the statement I quoted, bec. I believe it describes what tends to go on.

I do think education has gone downhill since the 70's; but I'm not quite old enough, or knowledgeable enough, to compare it to earlier times.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Karmadillo (Original post)

Sun Jun 17, 2012, 02:35 PM

3. K&R

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread