HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » Going nuclear-free: Germa...
Introducing Discussionist: A new forum by the creators of DU

Mon May 28, 2012, 09:57 PM

Going nuclear-free: Germany smashes solar power world record (PHOTOS)

Germanyís solar power plants produced a record 22 gigawatts of energy on Friday, equivalent to the output of 20 nuclear plants. The country is already a world-leader in solar power and hopes to be free of nuclear energy by 2022.

The director of the Institute of the Renewable Energy Industry (IWR) in Muenster, northeast Germany, said the solar power delivered to the national grid on Saturday met 50 per cent of the nationís energy quota.

"Never before anywhere has a country produced as much photovoltaic electricity. Germany came close to the 20 gigawatt (GW) mark a few times in recent weeks. But this was the first time we made it over," Norbert Allnoch told Reuters news agency.

The German government decided to turn its back on nuclear energy last year after the Fukushima disaster and plans to be nuclear-free by 2022. Critics have rounded on the initiative, skeptical that renewable sources can meet the nationís growing energy needs.

http://www.rt.com/news/solar-energy-record-break-332/

12 replies, 2226 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 12 replies Author Time Post
Reply Going nuclear-free: Germany smashes solar power world record (PHOTOS) (Original post)
MindMover May 2012 OP
freshwest May 2012 #1
Harmony Blue May 2012 #2
FarCenter May 2012 #6
marasinghe May 2012 #3
Harmony Blue May 2012 #5
SidDithers May 2012 #4
MindMover May 2012 #8
mahina May 2012 #7
Scurrilous May 2012 #9
Franker65 Jun 2012 #10
XemaSab Jun 2012 #11
XemaSab Jun 2012 #12

Response to MindMover (Original post)

Mon May 28, 2012, 10:02 PM

1. Good for them. Bet it was all done with union labor, as well.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MindMover (Original post)

Mon May 28, 2012, 10:05 PM

2. With a bit of ingenuity

and dedication a lot can be accomplished. The United States has become the "can't do it" nation, mainly because of Republican narrative, as they want to live in the past glory days of what made America great.

The biggest obstacle for Germany is moving away from coal power, but if given enough dedication I think they can accomplish that goal within 20 years.



Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Harmony Blue (Reply #2)

Mon May 28, 2012, 10:19 PM

6. Mainly it was an extremely generous feed in tarrif and the importation of cheap Chinese solar panels

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MindMover (Original post)

Mon May 28, 2012, 10:13 PM

3. excellent.

and considering Germany is towards the northern end of the Temperate Zone, this is quite remarkable.
Tropical Zone countries need to get their asses moving, fast.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to marasinghe (Reply #3)

Mon May 28, 2012, 10:17 PM

5. No kidding!

The sheer amount of solar energy potential for the United States is massive. California, Florida, Texas, etc. Not only that, but those regions tend to have superior weather conditions than Germany.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MindMover (Original post)

Mon May 28, 2012, 10:13 PM

4. Good for them, but it's a bit misleading to compare it to 20 nuclear power plants...

because the capacity factor of Solar is so different from the capacity factor of Nuclear.

I posted this in another thread on the same news item, and I'm going to copy it here:

The biggest problem with Solar is the capacity factor...

At those moments on Friday and Saturday at midday, Germany produced 22 GW. But what about when it's dark?

A better measure is the total annual power output, which is the Capacity x capacity factor x total hours in a year, expressed in GWh.


In total, Germany has 25 GW of total solar capacity, but the actual power output in 2011 was 18 TWh. This means that in 2011, their solar plants operated at a capacity factor of only ~ 8% (source wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_power_in_Germany )

25 GW x 24hours x 365 days x 8% capacity factor = 18,000 GWh of power output in a year


By comparison, Darlington Nuclear Generating Station outside of Toronto has a capacity of 3.512 GW but in 2011 operated at a capacity factor of 95%. (http://www.opg.com/power/nuclear/) Total power output from Darlington is:

3.512 GW x 24hours x 365 days x 95% capacity factor = 29,229 GWh of power output in a year

So, a single reactor complex, with 4 avg sized reactors, produced 62% more power in a 2011 than all of the solar in Germany.

Where did Germany get the other 96 or 97% of it's electricity in 2011?


Comparing German solar production to 20 nuclear power plants is misleading. German solar can more accurately be compared to 2 or 3 mid sized nuclear reactors.

Sid

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to SidDithers (Reply #4)

Tue May 29, 2012, 02:14 AM

8. Your numbers might add up but your quality of life and.....

continued raping of the earth to sustain power output is certain self destruction.....

Therefore, I vote for renewable energy.....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MindMover (Original post)

Mon May 28, 2012, 11:33 PM

7. It's amazing what people can do when half their govt isn't

bought and paid for by the oil corps.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MindMover (Original post)

Tue May 29, 2012, 12:54 PM

9. K & R

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MindMover (Original post)

Tue Jun 5, 2012, 03:56 AM

10. Great

I'm very happy to read this news but I wonder how realistic it is. Friday was quite warm and sunny, unusually so for this time of year. Now its back to wind, rain and clouds and I guess, not so much energy production. But still, its good to see that the Germans have the capacity. Statistics do show that Germany made a huge push to install extra capacity in comparison in recent years in comparison to other countries. Nicely done.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Franker65 (Reply #10)

Tue Jun 5, 2012, 04:30 AM

11. Welcome to DU!

We have a whole group for *discussing* energy and the environment. I hope you'll join us!

http://www.democraticunderground.com/?com=forum&id=1127

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Reply to this thread