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Sun Apr 29, 2012, 12:48 AM

A Powerful Reading List For You All... From My Former Professor 'The Economics Of Racism'

A Selected Bibliography on Racism
John F. Henry
Department of Economics
California State University, Sacramento
(* denotes especially recommended)


A. General Works

American Academy of Political and Social Science, The Negro's Progress in Fifty Years (1913)
*Aptheker, H., The Negro People in America (1946)
Brawley, B., A Social History of the American Negro (1921)
Brown, Wm., The Black Man: His Antecedents, His Genius and His Achievements (1863)
Cromwell, J., The Negro in American History (1916)
Carlyle, T., The Nigger Question
*Cox, O.C., Caste, Class and Race (1948)
Race Relations (1976)
DuBois, W. E. B., The World and Africa (1972)
The ABC of Color (1967)
The Souls of Black Folks (1903)
Color and Democracy (1945)
Elkins, S., Slavery (1959)
Easton, H., A Treatise on the Intellectual Character...of the Colored People of the U.S. (1837)
Ferris, W., The African Abroad..., 2 Vols. (1913)
Foner, P., American Socialism and Black Americans (1977)
* History of Black America, 4 Vols.
Fortune, T., Black and White: Land, Labor and Politics in the South (1884)
*Foster, Wm., The Negro People in American History (1954)
Franklin, J. H., From Slavery to Freedom, 4th ed. (1974)
Haynes, R., The Trend of the Races (1922)
Helm, H., From Darkness to Bright (1909)
Herskovitz, M., The Myth of the Negro Past (1941)
Jordan, W., White over Black (1968)
The White Man's Burden (1974)
McGay, V., Africa in World Politics (1963)
McWilliams, C., Brothers Under the Skin (1964)
Meier, A. and Rudwick, E., From Plantation to Ghetto (1966)
Mill, J. S., The Nigger Question
Miller, K., An Appeal to Conscience: America's Color Code of Caste A Disgrace to
Democracy (1918)
Myrdal, G. An American Dilemma (1944)Payne, D., History of the A.M.E.Z. Church (1891)
Phillips, U., Life and Labor in the Old South
American Negro Slavery (1918)
-2-
Rogers, J. A., Nature Knows No Color Line (1952)
Rosenberg, A., Race and Race History
Southern Exposure, Mark of the Beast (1980)
Thomas, W. H., The American Negro (1901)
Washington, B. T., The Future of the American Negro (1879)
The Negro in Business (1907)
Williams, G. W., A History of the Negro Race in America From 1619 to 1880 (1883)
Winston, H., Strategy For a Black Agenda (1973)
Wood, N., The White Side of a Black Subject (1896)
Woodward, C., Origins of the New South (1951)

A.1 Bibliographic Guides

Abajian, J., Blacks in Selected Newspapers, etc.
Afro-Americana, 1553-1906
Bibliographic Guide to Black Studies
Fisk University Library, Dictionary Catalogue of the Negro Collection
Howard University Library, Dictionary Catalogue of the Jesse E. Moorland Collection of
Negro Life and History
Index to Periodical Articles by and about Negroes
Jenkins, B. and Phillis, S., Black Separation: A Bibliography
Kumatz, T. and Wolf, J., The Black Experience
McPherson, J., et. al., Blacks in America
Miller, E., The Negro in America
N. Y. Public Library, Dictionary Catalogue of the Schomberg Collection of Negro Literature

And that's just half of the A's...

Link: (.pdf file): http://www.csus.edu/indiv/h/henryjf/PDFS/RacismBib.pdf

Education... what a wonderful thing...



AND... Make sure you read this in your lifetime:



And...






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Arrow 12 replies Author Time Post
Reply A Powerful Reading List For You All... From My Former Professor 'The Economics Of Racism' (Original post)
WillyT Apr 2012 OP
hfojvt Apr 2012 #1
WillyT Dec 2013 #7
hfojvt Dec 2013 #9
Starry Messenger Apr 2012 #2
Quantess Apr 2012 #3
WillyT Apr 2012 #4
Journeyman Dec 2013 #5
Grey Dec 2013 #6
malaise Dec 2013 #8
bravenak Dec 2013 #10
WillyT Dec 2013 #11
bravenak Dec 2013 #12

Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sun Apr 29, 2012, 03:23 AM

1. crap, I have not read any of those

I doubt if I am alone in that.

I don't think I sold very many of them either. I had a few books by Dubois and Douglass and Richard Wright, but that was about it.

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Response to hfojvt (Reply #1)

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 12:18 PM

7. It's One Hell Of A List... I've Read Only 5 Of Them...




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Response to WillyT (Reply #7)

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 01:16 PM

9. I think I was only looking at the A's

but scrolling through it now, I notice that Martin Luther King is not mentioned on the list, although Malcolm X is. I have fairly recently read King's "Stride towards freedom" and "why we can't wait", the latter just this year.

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sun Apr 29, 2012, 05:18 AM

2. k&r

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sun Apr 29, 2012, 05:25 AM

3. Amputees?

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Response to Quantess (Reply #3)

Sun Apr 29, 2012, 12:58 PM

4. Yep... If You Didn't Bring In Enough Rubber For King Leopold (And Firestone), You Lost A Hand...

Blister the meddlesome missionaries! They write tons of these things. They seem to be always around, always spying, always eye-witnessing the happenings; and everything they see they commit to paper. They are always prowling from place to place; the natives consider them their only friends; they go to them with their sorrows; they show them their scars and their wounds, inflicted by my soldier police; they hold up the stumps of their arms and lament because their hands have been chopped off, as punishment for not bringing in enough rubber, and as proof to be laid before my officers that the required punishment was well and truly carried out. One of these missionaries saw eighty-one of these hands drying over a fire for transmission to my officials -- and of course he must go and set it down and print it. They travel and travel, they spy and spy! And nothing is too trivial for them to print.


<And...>

Another madman wants to construct a memorial for the perpetuation of my name, out of my 15,000,000 skulls and skeletons, and is full of vindictive enthusiasm over his strange project. He has it all ciphered out and drawn to scale. Out of the skulls he will build a combined monument and mausoleum to me which shall exactly duplicate the Great Pyramid of Cheops, whose base covers thirteen acres, and whose apex is 451 feet above ground. He desires to stuff me and stand me up in the sky on that apex, robed and crowned, with my "pirate flag" in one hand and a butcher-knife and pendant handcuffs in the other. He will build the pyramid in the center of a depopulated tract, a brooding solitude covered with weeds and the mouldering ruins of burned villages, where the spirits of the starved and murdered dead will voice their laments forever in the whispers of the wandering winds. Radiating from the pyramid, like the spokes of a wheel, there are to be forty grand avenues of approach, each thirty-five miles long, and each fenced on both sides by skulless skeletons standing a yard and a half apart and festooned together in line by short chains stretching from wrist to wrist and attached to tried and true old handcuffs stamped with my private trade-mark, a crucifix and butcher-knife crossed, with motto, "By this sign we prosper"; each osseous fence to consist of 200,000 skeletons on a side, which is 400,000 to each avenue. It is remarked with satisfaction that it aggregates three or four thousand miles (single-ranked) of skeletons -- 15,000,000 all told -- and would stretch across America from New York to San Francisco. It is remarked further, in the hopeful tone of a railroad company forecasting showy extensions of its mileage, that my output is 500,000 corpses a year when my plant is running full time, and that therefore if I am spared ten years longer there will be fresh skulls enough to add 175 feet to the pyramid, making it by a long way the loftiest architectural construction on the earth, and fresh skeletons enough to continue the transcontinental file (on piles) a thousand miles into the Pacific. The cost of gathering the materials from my "widely scattered and innumerable private graveyards," and transporting them, and building the monument and the radiating grand avenues, is duly ciphered out, running into an aggregate of millions of guineas, and then -- why then, (---- ----!! ---- ----!!) this idiot asks me to furnish the money! <Sudden and effusive application of the crucifix> He reminds me that my yearly income from the Congo is millions of guineas, and that "only" 5,000,000 would be required for his enterprise. Every day wild attempts are made upon my purse; they do not affect me, they cost me not a thought. But this one -- this one troubles me, makes me nervous; for there is no telling what an unhinged creature like this may think of next.... If he should think of Carnegie -- but I must banish that thought out of my mind! it worries my days; it troubles my sleep. That way lies madness. <After a pause> There is no other way -- I have got to buy Carnegie.



"My yearly income from the Congo is millions of guineas."

From: http://www.chss.montclair.edu/english/furr/i2l/kls.html


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Response to Quantess (Reply #3)

Tue Dec 10, 2013, 01:09 AM

5. In "The Origins of Totalitarianism," Book II: "Imperialism," Hannah Arendt explained . . .

that Belgian Imperialism was significantly different from that of other European nations and the United States, in that it was not an expansion of either the nation or the bourgeoisie, but an expansion of the power of the Belgian king personally, unchecked by any branch of government, unconnected with any other institution. The atrocities committed in the Belgian Congo, she wrote, were "unequalled." In a 20 year period, the population was reduced from an estimated 20 to 40 million in 1890 to 8.5 million in 1911.

This is the stage on which Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness takes place. This is the land and time about which Mr Kurtz could only weakly whisper: "The horror! The horror!"

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 01:14 AM

6. ..

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 01:10 PM

8. Kick and recommend

BOOKMARKED

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Fri Dec 13, 2013, 11:04 PM

10. Great list. I have read some of those myself.

In the 30's the WPA had a project to write down first hand accounts of slaves in America. I read many volumes and it's some are available for free on amazon.com. I think everybody should read them. You can find the free ebooks here:http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=ntt_athr_dp_sr_1/183-9395419-3455719?_encoding=UTF8&field-author=Work%20Projects%20Administration&search-alias=books&sort=relevancerank

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Response to bravenak (Reply #10)

Sat Dec 14, 2013, 12:20 PM

11. Thank You For That !!!




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Response to WillyT (Reply #11)

Sat Dec 14, 2013, 08:16 PM

12. You're welcome!

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