HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » FACT SHEET: Ukraine-Relat...

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 12:26 PM

FACT SHEET: Ukraine-Related Sanctions (updated)

FACT SHEET: Ukraine-Related Sanctions

President Obama today issued a new Executive Order (E.O.) under the national emergency with respect to Ukraine that finds that the actions and policies of the Russian government with respect to Ukraine -– including through the deployment of Russian military forces in the Crimea region of Ukraine –- undermine democratic processes and institutions in Ukraine; threaten its peace, security, stability, sovereignty, and territorial integrity; and contribute to the misappropriation of its assets.

This new authority expands upon E.O. 13660, which the President signed less than two weeks ago, by authorizing the Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Secretary of State, to impose sanctions on named officials of the Russian government, any individual or entity that operates in the Russian arms industry, and any designated individual or entity that acts on behalf of, or that provides material or other support to, any senior Russian government official. We have fashioned these sanctions to impose costs on named individuals who wield influence in the Russian government and those responsible for the deteriorating situation in Ukraine. We stand ready to use these authorities in a direct and targeted fashion as events warrant.

In response to the Russian government’s actions contributing to the crisis in Ukraine, this new E.O. lists seven Russian government officials who are being designated for sanctions. These individuals are Vladislav Surkov, Sergey Glazyev, Leonid Slutsky, Andrei Klishas, Valentina Matviyenko, Dmitry Rogozin, and Yelena Mizulina.

The United States also will seek to hold accountable individuals who use their resources or influence to support or act on behalf of senior Russian government officials. We recognize that the Russian leadership derives significant support from, and takes action through, individuals who do not themselves serve in any official capacity. Our current focus is to identify these individuals and target their personal assets, but not companies that they may manage on behalf of the Russian state.

In addition to the new E.O., the Treasury Department today has imposed sanctions on four other individuals under E.O. 13660, issued on March 6, for their actions or policies that threaten the peace, security, stability, sovereignty, or territorial integrity of Ukraine and in undermining the Government of Ukraine. They are Crimea-based separatist leaders Sergey Aksyonov and Vladimir Konstantinov; former Ukrainian presidential chief of staff Viktor Medvedchuk; and former President of Ukraine Viktor Yanukovych.

Today’s actions send a strong message to the Russian government that there are consequences for their actions that violate the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine, including their actions supporting the illegal referendum for Crimean separation. The United States, together with international partners, will continue to stand by the Ukrainian government to ensure that costs are imposed on Crimean separatists and their Russian backers. Today’s actions also serve as notice to Russia that unless it abides by its international obligations and returns its military forces to their original bases and respects Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity, the United States is prepared to take additional steps to impose further political and economic costs.

  • Vladislav Surkov: Surkov is being sanctioned for his status as a Presidential Aide to Russian President Vladimir Putin.

  • Sergey Glazyev: Glazyev is being sanctioned for his status as a Presidential Adviser to Russian President Vladimir Putin.

  • Leonid Slutsky: Slutsky is being sanctioned for his status as a State Duma deputy, where he is Chairman of the Duma Committee on CIS Affairs, Eurasian Integration, and Relations with Compatriots.

  • Andrei Klishas: Klishas is being sanctioned for his status as a Member of the Council of Federation of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation and as Chairman of the Federation Council Committee of Constitutional Law, Judicial, and Legal Affairs, and the Development of Civil Society.

  • Valentina Matviyenko: Matviyenko is being sanctioned for her status as Head of the Federation Council

  • Dmitry Rogozin: Rogozin is being sanctioned for his status as the Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation.

  • Yelena Mizulina: Mizulina is being sanctioned for her status as a State Duma Deputy.

  • Sergey Aksyonov: Aksyonov is being designated for threatening the peace, security, stability, sovereignty, or territorial integrity of Ukraine, and for undermining Ukraine’s democratic institutions and processes. Aksyonov claims to be the Prime Minister of Crimea and has rejected the authority of the legitimate government in Kyiv.

  • Vladimir Konstantinov: Konstantinov is being designated for threatening the peace, security, stability, sovereignty, or territorial integrity of Ukraine, and for undermining Ukraine’s democratic institutions and processes. Konstantinov is the speaker of the Crimean parliament, which on March 11, 2014, declared independence from Ukraine.

  • Viktor Medvedchuk: Medvedchuk, leader of Ukrainian Choice, is being designated for threatening the peace, security, stability, sovereignty, or territorial integrity of Ukraine, and for undermining Ukraine’s democratic institutions and processes. He is also being designated because he has materially assisted, sponsored, or provided financial, material, or technological support to Yanukovych and because he is a leader of an entity that has, or whose members have, engaged in actions or policies that undermine democratic processes or institutions in Ukraine and actions or policies that threaten the peace, security, stability, sovereignty, or territorial integrity of Ukraine.

  • Viktor Yanukovych: Former Ukrainian President Yanukovych is being designated for threatening the peace, security, stability, sovereignty, or territorial integrity of Ukraine, and for undermining Ukraine’s democratic institutions and processes. After abandoning Kyiv and ultimately fleeing to Russia, Viktor Yanukovych called upon Russian President Vladimir Putin to send Russian troops into Ukraine.
http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/03/17/fact-sheet-ukraine-related-sanctions


Updated to add:

Statement by the President on Ukraine

THE PRESIDENT: Good morning, everybody. In recent months, as the citizens of Ukraine have made their voices heard, we have been guided by a fundamental principle -- the future of Ukraine must be decided by the people of Ukraine. That means Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity must be respected, and international law must be upheld.

And so, Russia’s decision to send troops into Crimea has rightly drawn global condemnation. From the start, the United States has mobilized the international community in support of Ukraine to isolate Russia for its actions and to reassure our allies and partners. We saw this international unity again over the weekend, when Russia stood alone in the U.N. Security Council defending its actions in Crimea. And as I told President Putin yesterday, the referendum in Crimea was a clear violation of Ukrainian constitutions and international law, and it will not be recognized by the international community.

Today, I’m announcing a series of measures that will continue to increase the cost on Russia and on those responsible for what is happening in Ukraine. First, as authorized by the executive order I signed two weeks ago, we are imposing sanctions on specific individuals responsible for undermining the sovereignty, territorial integrity and government of Ukraine. We’re making it clear that there are consequences for their actions.

Second, I have signed a new executive order that expands the scope of our sanctions. As an initial step, I’m authorizing sanctions on Russian officials -- entities operating in the arms sector in Russia and individuals who provide material support to senior officials of the Russian government. And if Russia continues to interfere in Ukraine, we stand ready to impose further sanctions.

Third, we’re continuing our close consultations with our European partners, who today in Brussels moved ahead with their own sanctions against Russia. Tonight, Vice President Biden departs for Europe, where he will meet with the leaders of our NATO allies -- Poland, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. And I’ll be traveling to Europe next week. Our message will be clear. As NATO allies, we have a solemn commitment to our collective defense, and we will uphold this commitment.

Fourth, we’ll continue to make clear to Russia that further provocations will achieve nothing except to further isolate Russia and diminish its place in the world. The international community will continue to stand together to oppose any violations of Ukrainian sovereignty and territorial integrity, and continued Russian military intervention in Ukraine will only deepen Russia’s diplomatic isolation and exact a greater toll on the Russian economy.

Going forward, we can calibrate our response based on whether Russia chooses to escalate or to de-escalate the situation. Now, I believe there’s still a path to resolve this situation diplomatically in a way that addresses the interest of both Russia and Ukraine. That includes Russia pulling its forces in Crimea back to their bases, supporting the deployment of additional international monitors in Ukraine, and engaging in dialogue with the Ukrainian government, which has indicated its openness to pursuing constitutional reform as they move forward towards elections this spring.

But throughout this process, we’re going to stand firm in our unwavering support for Ukraine. As I told Prime Minister Yatsenyuk last week, the United States stands with the people of Ukraine and their right to determine their own destiny. We’re going to keep working with Congress and our international partners to offer Ukraine the economic support that it needs to weather this crisis and to improve the daily lives of the Ukrainian people.

And as we go forward, we’ll continue to look at the range of ways we can help our Ukrainian friends achieve their universal rights and the security, prosperity and dignity that they deserve. Thanks very much. And Jay, I think, will be available for questions. Thank you.

http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/03/17/statement-president-ukraine

Video here: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/18/world/europe/obamas-statement-on-new-sanctions-against-russia.html

54 replies, 1496 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 54 replies Author Time Post
Reply FACT SHEET: Ukraine-Related Sanctions (updated) (Original post)
ProSense Mar 2014 OP
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #1
ProSense Mar 2014 #2
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #3
ProSense Mar 2014 #5
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #7
ProSense Mar 2014 #10
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #12
ProSense Mar 2014 #14
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #16
ProSense Mar 2014 #17
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #19
ProSense Mar 2014 #24
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #25
ProSense Mar 2014 #28
treestar Mar 2014 #45
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #48
treestar Mar 2014 #49
Rex Mar 2014 #4
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #6
Rex Mar 2014 #9
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #13
Rex Mar 2014 #15
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #21
Rex Mar 2014 #22
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #23
Rex Mar 2014 #26
geek tragedy Mar 2014 #36
ProSense Mar 2014 #8
Rex Mar 2014 #11
FarCenter Mar 2014 #18
Rex Mar 2014 #20
ProSense Mar 2014 #27
FarCenter Mar 2014 #33
ProSense Mar 2014 #43
FarCenter Mar 2014 #44
grahamhgreen Mar 2014 #50
NuclearDem Mar 2014 #29
ChisolmTrailDem Mar 2014 #30
ProSense Mar 2014 #31
ProSense Mar 2014 #32
ChisolmTrailDem Mar 2014 #35
reformist2 Mar 2014 #34
ChisolmTrailDem Mar 2014 #37
ProSense Mar 2014 #39
ChisolmTrailDem Mar 2014 #40
ProSense Mar 2014 #42
treestar Mar 2014 #46
ProSense Mar 2014 #38
ChisolmTrailDem Mar 2014 #41
William769 Mar 2014 #47
sheshe2 Mar 2014 #51
pinto Mar 2014 #52
ProSense Mar 2014 #53
ProSense Mar 2014 #54

Response to ProSense (Original post)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 12:31 PM

1. Whoop-dee-shit.

You guys violated international law and invaded another nation's territory and engaged in conquest and annexation.

As a result, we impose sanctions in the form of seizing exactly zero assets since you weren't stupid enough to park them in our banks. Furthermore, you shall not be able to use our financial system or travel here, not that you ever had any intent of doing so.


They didn't even touch the plutocrats.

Russian stock market is up today--investors aren't taking these sanctions seriously either.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geek tragedy (Reply #1)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 12:36 PM

2. Well, dimissing these and

You guys violated international law and invaded another nation's territory and engaged in conquest and annexation.

As a result, we impose sanctions in the form of seizing exactly zero assets since you weren't stupid enough to park them in our banks. Furthermore, you shall not be able to use our financial system or travel here, not that you ever had any intent of doing so.

...making up a statement to justify why you think these aren't going to be effective isn't much of a fact-based argument.

<...>

Sanction Traction

“In order to get any traction with sanctions you have to bring the EU in and I think that will be a difficult task because of their dependence on Russian oil and gas resources,” Gunitsky said.

The EU’s bill for Russian oil and gas amounted to $156.5 billion in 2012, 38 times what the U.S. spent for Russian energy, according to the International Trade Centre’s Trade Map, a venture sponsored by the World Trade Organization and the United Nations.

Sanctions that crimp the lifestyles of Putin’s billionaire friends, such as visa restrictions and bank account freezes, might “be more effective and easier for Europe to stomach than sanctions on Russian gas,” Gunitsky said.

And energy sanctions may backfire if cutting off Russian shipments raises prices and triggers a backlash from angry European consumers.

- more -

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-03-17/russia-s-160-billion-stick-hinders-crimean-sanctions.html

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Reply #2)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 12:39 PM

3. at some point people will stop believing him when he engages in tough talk.

explain to me how these are going to be effective. they're insults, not sanctions. sanctions would be going after people/institutions with serious money

Though he's not looking as stupid as Angela Merkel is this morning.



Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geek tragedy (Reply #3)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 12:44 PM

5. You know,

at some point people will stop believing him when he engages in tough talk.

explain to me how these are going to be effective. they're insults, not sanctions. sanctions would be going after people/institutions with serious money

Though he's not looking as stupid as Angela Merkel is this morning.

...I don't think taunting that sanctions aren't going to work, and then continuing to say that the sanctions should be tougher is effective.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Reply #5)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 12:45 PM

7. no less effective than these 'sanctions'

it would have been better to do nothing, and say nothing

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geek tragedy (Reply #7)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 12:50 PM

10. Again,

"it would have been better to do nothing, and say nothing "

...your point is all over the place. You are for tougher sanctions or just let him have Crimea and do what he wants to?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Reply #10)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 12:54 PM

12. I am against talking tough and then acting weak.

If you're not going to do anything of note, don't talk like you are.

It diminishes credibility.

They're laughing at Obama in Russia, literally. The targets of those sanctions are yukking it up.

If he had done nothing, at least he could have been pretending to work on something meaningful.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geek tragedy (Reply #12)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:01 PM

14. You

"I am against talking tough and then acting weak...They're laughing at Obama in Russia, literally. The targets of those sanctions are yukking it up."

...have yet to say what you think would be "talking tough and then acting" tough?

No doubt the American RW warmongers are laughing too. You're right though, they're laughing on Twitter, which doesn't strike me as a position of strength. LOL!

http://www.democraticunderground.com/10024678429

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Reply #14)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:03 PM

16. targeting Putin's plutocratic buddies, or doing something of actual economic consequence

If Obama was never going to do something serious, he shouldn't have bluffed.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geek tragedy (Reply #16)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:05 PM

17. Why do you keep insisting that his "plutocratic buddies" weren't? n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Reply #17)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:07 PM

19. 7 officials, that's it. 7. all in the government.

I mean, how did they write this with a straight face:

Today's actions send a strong message to the Russian government that there are consequences for their actions that violate the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine, including their actions supporting the illegal referendum for Crimean separation,"


There are no consequences, just a public F.U. that's pretending to be consequences

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geek tragedy (Reply #19)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:12 PM

24. There are more than seven people listed in the OP, and

the EU is targeting 21 people. Also, why do you think the list can't be expanded?


EU imposes sanctions after Crimea moves to join Russia

By Aleksandar Vasovic and Adrian Croft

(Reuters) - The European Union is to impose sanctions including asset freezes and travel bans on 21 officials from Russia and Ukraine after Crimea applied to join Russia on Monday following a weekend referendum, Lithuania's foreign minister said.

Crimea's leaders declared a Soviet-style 97-percent result in favor of seceding from Ukraine in a vote condemned as illegal by Kiev and the West.

After a meeting lasting around three hours, the EU's 28 foreign ministers agreed on a list of those to be sanctioned for their part in Russia's seizure of Crimea and Sunday's referendum on joining Russia.

The ministers had "just agreed on sanctions - travel restrictions & assets freeze against 21 officials from Ukraine & Russia," Lithuanian foreign minister Linan Linkevicius wrote in a message on Twitter.

- more -

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/03/17/us-ukraine-crisis-idUSBREA1Q1E820140317

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Reply #24)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:14 PM

25. 4 of them are Ukrainians or Crimeans.

when the plutocrats start losing money, then we'll know the EU and US are serious

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geek tragedy (Reply #25)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:19 PM

28. "when the plutocrats start losing money, then we'll know the EU and US are serious "

Ah, there you go. So there are sanctions that will impact Russia. What of the 21 people being targeted by the EU? Still, you're now on board with the piece I posted in comment 2.

<...>

Sanction Traction

“In order to get any traction with sanctions you have to bring the EU in and I think that will be a difficult task because of their dependence on Russian oil and gas resources,” Gunitsky said.

The EU’s bill for Russian oil and gas amounted to $156.5 billion in 2012, 38 times what the U.S. spent for Russian energy, according to the International Trade Centre’s Trade Map, a venture sponsored by the World Trade Organization and the United Nations.

Sanctions that crimp the lifestyles of Putin’s billionaire friends, such as visa restrictions and bank account freezes, might “be more effective and easier for Europe to stomach than sanctions on Russian gas,” Gunitsky said.

And energy sanctions may backfire if cutting off Russian shipments raises prices and triggers a backlash from angry European consumers.

- more -

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-03-17/russia-s-160-billion-stick-hinders-crimean-sanctions.html


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geek tragedy (Reply #16)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 02:13 PM

45. I would have thought this would be praised

as it appears to go after the 1% and those who actually made the decisions as opposed to the ordinary people in Russia.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to treestar (Reply #45)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 02:34 PM

48. except it doesn't go after the 1%--it is very likely that not a dime

of money is affected by this

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geek tragedy (Reply #48)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 02:38 PM

49. In your other thread one of them is

admitting he has US assets.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geek tragedy (Reply #1)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 12:42 PM

4. The Russians are not scared of us in the least bit.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/may/6/russian-bombers-again-fly-close-to-us/?page=all
We did nothing.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Russian_bombers_fly_close_to_US_border_report_999.html
NATO planes flew as chaperons.

Putin resumed Cold War flights of long range bombers under Dubya. Dubya in turn looked into Putin's eyes and found a kindred spirit.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rex (Reply #4)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 12:44 PM

6. seems to be a bipartisan area of agreement when it comes to Russia.

Act all huffy and puffy, and then do nothing or next-to-nothing.

If they're not going to do anything, just shut up and focus on other problems.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geek tragedy (Reply #6)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 12:48 PM

9. I agree, we have huge problems in America right now.

I know for a fact that there will be no military intervention. And freezing the accounts of a handful of Russian generals means nothing in the long run. I do however think Putin is making a mistake if he thinks Obama is weak and an ineffective POTUS like his GOOD BUDDY George Bush Jr. Nothing could be further from the truth imo.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rex (Reply #9)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 12:56 PM

13. I think Putin realizes now that the Europe and China don't have any stomach for

a confrontation with Russia, regardless of what Obama says or does.

So, I don't think it comes down to is he a strong or weak President, he simply doesn't have the tools to even inconvenience Putin.

Putin pretty much called his bluff.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geek tragedy (Reply #13)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:01 PM

15. Plus he knows good and well NO country wants to be responsible for starting WWIII.

It just worries me how much control he has over the national media in Russia and who might disappear for voicing opposition.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rex (Reply #15)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:08 PM

21. Russia's always going to be authoritarian. That's just how they roll there.

Stalin has 50% approval there.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geek tragedy (Reply #21)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:10 PM

22. True, my wishing for a democratic government to emerge is just that. Wishing.

It will never happen.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rex (Reply #22)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:12 PM

23. best we can do is what he hope for our own country, that its national self-esteem not

be so wrapped up in the use of military force.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geek tragedy (Reply #23)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:16 PM

26. Yes. The last thing we need is a Rambo general all pissed off cuz he

is missing his chance to kill some Reds. Of course if things were much worse...say McCain had won the election, we would all be piles of radioactive ash by now! Obama has a cool head on his shoulders and I am thankful for it.

But yeah...those were some of the weakest sanctions I've ever seen. It must come from the frustration that Russia does not need anything from us or our allies. Hard to place economic sanctions on a country thats population is use to standing in line for toilet paper and potatoes.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rex (Reply #26)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:40 PM

36. I get the impulse to avoid pissing the Russians off and being cautious, I also

get the impulse to provide a stiff penalty for this kind of thing, with the idea being to deter future acts like it

but I don't get intentionally insulting the Russians (they named two guys because they were Putin's aides, which is pretty personal) but then not having any oomph behind the actions.

seems like the worst of both worlds

Reminds me of his dealings with Netanyahu.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rex (Reply #4)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 12:48 PM

8. You think that was considered when the sanctions were imposed? n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Reply #8)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 12:50 PM

11. I don't really know, but I do think Putin is making a huge mistake

if the thinks Obama is a weak leader like George Bush Jr. was.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geek tragedy (Reply #1)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:06 PM

18. Sanctioning the plutocrats won't work -- they have too many friends in the West.

Plus, a lot of them are not Russian, if you look up their family backgrounds.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to FarCenter (Reply #18)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:08 PM

20. I think it was an attempt at Western Justice.

Sanctioning plutocrats in THIS COUNTRY would be a death nail for said uber rich people. I have no idea if the dynamics are the same in Russia...but I doubt it.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to FarCenter (Reply #18)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:16 PM

27. So it would work if they didn't have "too many friends in the West"?

I mean, what kind of statement is that? You think people in the "West" are going to risk their standing to protect a Russian plutocrats?

Anyone who would likely be a "friend" is advocating war.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Reply #27)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:36 PM

33. You could look them up yourself, and assess how vulnerable they are.

Russian Ranking, World Ranking, Name, Age, Personal Fortune (billions), Associated Companies
#1 #34 Alisher Usmanov 59 $17.6 Metalloinvest
#2 #41 Mikhail Fridman 48 $16.5 TNK-BP
#3 #47 Leonid Mikhelson 57 $15.4 Novatek
#4 #52 Vicktor Vekselberg 56 $15.1 Renova, Skolkovo Fund
#5 #55 Vagit Alekperov 62 $14.8 Lukoil
#6 #56 Andrey Melnichenko 57 $14.4 Novatek, Sibur Holding, First United Bank
#7 #58 Vladimir Potanin 52 $14.3 Interros, ProfMedia
#8 #62 Vladimir Lisin 56 $14.1 First Cargo Novolipetsk
#9 #62 Gennady Timchenko 60 $14.1 Gunvor Group, Novatek
#10 #69 Mikhail Prokhorov 47 $13.0 Onexim


I, for one, would like to see the US Treasury owning the Brooklyn Nets.

Note that some of them live outside of Russia, and Putin would probably take the opportunity to seize their assets in Russia.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to FarCenter (Reply #33)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 02:09 PM

43. What is that supposed to be a list of: friends in the "West"? n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Reply #43)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 02:12 PM

44. It is the list of the top 10 Russian billionaires, i.e. the leading oligarchs.

Billionaire Fridman’s L1 Buys RWE Unit for $7.1 Billion

L1 Energy, the investment vehicle of Russia’s fourth-richest man Mikhail Fridman, agreed to buy RWE AG (RWE)’s Dea oil and gas unit, gaining assets in the U.K., Germany and the North Sea.

The sale values Dea at about 5.1 billion euros ($7.1 billion), including debt, Germany’s largest power generator said in a statement yesterday. The deal is the first for LetterOne, the group set up by Fridman, 49, and co-investor German Khan last year to invest part of $14 billion they gained from selling a stake in the Moscow-based TNK-BP oil venture.

The agreement helps Fridman and Khan move their energy investment abroad as RWE, which reported its first full-year loss since the foundation of the Federal Republic of Germany in 1949, looks to raise cash from asset sales.

LetterOne has earmarked as much as $10 billion for investment in the global oil and gas business over the next five years and attracted a number of high-profile energy executives to its advisory board, including former BP Plc (BP/) Chief Executive Officer John Browne and Anadarko Petroleum Corp.’s Jim Hackett.

The transaction must still win final approval from RWE’s supervisory board and regulators in several countries, the utility said. Dea pumps oil and gas in the U.K., Germany and Norway and is “no longer” of strategic importance, RWE CEO Peter Terium said in April last year.


http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-03-16/rwe-agrees-to-sell-7-1-billion-dea-division-to-letterone-group.html

Seems to be business as usual today for the oligarchs.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geek tragedy (Reply #1)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 03:15 PM

50. Nuke 'em! Nuke 'em! Nuke 'em! YeeHaw!!!!!



How 'bout we stop fostering revolutions for the neo-cons, instead.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Original post)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:30 PM

29. Needs a little more teeth, though if this is just a preview, that's good.

It's really the EU's job now. Boycotting Russian energy is probably one of the most effective sanctions that can be mustered.

Not to say I don't approve, I absolutely do, but there needs to be much more and much harsher.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Original post)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:32 PM

30. Big fucking deal. Weak-assed bullshit. That ought to teach Puti! nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ChisolmTrailDem (Reply #30)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:34 PM

31. Yeah, but look at the reaction it got from you. n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ChisolmTrailDem (Reply #30)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:35 PM

32. Oh, forgot to ask, what would you consider not "weak-assed bullshit"? n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Reply #32)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:40 PM

35. Well, the sanctions could have included Puti, Medvedev, and other deputies. Also,

remember the sanctions on Saddam, or So. Africa? It could have been stronger than those.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Original post)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:37 PM

34. The singling out of individuals seems really petty - and a little weird, imo.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to reformist2 (Reply #34)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:41 PM

37. Weak, is the word. nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ChisolmTrailDem (Reply #37)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:44 PM

39. Didn't you just single out individuals above? n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Reply #39)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:47 PM

40. With Puti and Medvedev, etc, it would be less weak, but still weak. Anything less than a total

shut-off of all trade and Russia's expulsion from the UN Security Council is W-E-A-K ... WEAK!

I'm usually with you, Prosense, but not in cheerleading these jokes of sanctions.

You aren't going to change my mind, either.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ChisolmTrailDem (Reply #40)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 02:07 PM

42. Well,

"Anything less than a total shut-off of all trade and Russia's expulsion from the UN Security Council is W-E-A-K ... WEAK!"

...it's not like the sanctions can't be expanded, and not everyone agrees with your assessment.

<...>

Sanction Traction

“In order to get any traction with sanctions you have to bring the EU in and I think that will be a difficult task because of their dependence on Russian oil and gas resources,” Gunitsky said.

The EU’s bill for Russian oil and gas amounted to $156.5 billion in 2012, 38 times what the U.S. spent for Russian energy, according to the International Trade Centre’s Trade Map, a venture sponsored by the World Trade Organization and the United Nations.

Sanctions that crimp the lifestyles of Putin’s billionaire friends, such as visa restrictions and bank account freezes, might “be more effective and easier for Europe to stomach than sanctions on Russian gas,” Gunitsky said.

And energy sanctions may backfire if cutting off Russian shipments raises prices and triggers a backlash from angry European consumers.

- more -

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-03-17/russia-s-160-billion-stick-hinders-crimean-sanctions.html


The EU is targeting 21 individuals.

EU imposes sanctions after Crimea moves to join Russia

By Aleksandar Vasovic and Adrian Croft

(Reuters) - The European Union is to impose sanctions including asset freezes and travel bans on 21 officials from Russia and Ukraine after Crimea applied to join Russia on Monday following a weekend referendum, Lithuania's foreign minister said.

Crimea's leaders declared a Soviet-style 97-percent result in favor of seceding from Ukraine in a vote condemned as illegal by Kiev and the West.

After a meeting lasting around three hours, the EU's 28 foreign ministers agreed on a list of those to be sanctioned for their part in Russia's seizure of Crimea and Sunday's referendum on joining Russia.

The ministers had "just agreed on sanctions - travel restrictions & assets freeze against 21 officials from Ukraine & Russia," Lithuanian foreign minister Linan Linkevicius wrote in a message on Twitter.

- more -

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/03/17/us-ukraine-crisis-idUSBREA1Q1E820140317


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ChisolmTrailDem (Reply #40)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 02:15 PM

46. What is the procedure for expulsion from the UN Security Council?

Sounds easier said than done.

Total shut off of all trade.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to reformist2 (Reply #34)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:43 PM

38. It's typical. n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Reply #38)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 01:50 PM

41. It's weak. nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Original post)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 02:15 PM

47. Kick & highly recommended!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Original post)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 03:19 PM

51. K&R

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Original post)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 03:21 PM

52. Thanks for posting and passing this on. We'll see what develops.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to pinto (Reply #52)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 03:47 PM

53. You're welcome. n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ProSense (Original post)

Mon Mar 17, 2014, 08:17 PM

54. Londongrad Dealmakers Face Sanctions Hit After $180 Billion Boom

Londongrad Dealmakers Face Sanctions Hit After $180 Billion Boom
http://www.democraticunderground.com/10024680947

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread