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Thu Mar 22, 2012, 01:45 PM

A year later, Libya is still a mess

A year later, Libya is still a mess
After the West's much-ballyhood intervention, Libya is dominated by a complex tangle of violent militias — and the chaos is spilling into neighboring countries
POSTED ON MARCH 21, 2012, AT 6:25 PM

One year after the U.S., Britain, and France began their war in Libya, the harmful consequences of Western intervention are readily apparent. The internal disorder and regional instability that the West's assault created were foreseen by many critics. And yet, Western governments made no meaningful efforts to prepare for them. No one planned to stabilize Libya once Moammar Gadhafi was overthrown, and the National Transitional Council (NTC) rejected the idea of an outside stabilization force, which has left Libya at serious risk of fragmentation and renewed conflict. Intervention "on the cheap" may be more politically palatable in the West because of the low cost to Western nations, but it can still be quite destructive for the countries affected by it.

. . .

But the Libyan war's worst impact may have occurred outside of Libya. The neighboring country of Mali, which also happens to support U.S. counter-terrorist efforts in western Africa, has been roiled by a new Tuareg insurgency fueled by the influx of men and weapons after Gadhafi's defeat, providing the Tuareg rebels with much more sophisticated weaponry than they had before. This new upheaval benefits al Qaeda in the Maghreb (AQIM), and the Tuareg uprising threatens the territorial integrity of Mali. The rebellion has also displaced nearly 200,000 civilians in a region that is already at risk of famine, and refugees from Mali are beginning to strain local resources in Niger, where most of them have fled. "Success" in Libya is creating a political and humanitarian disaster in Mali and Niger.

Paradoxically, the Libyan war and its aftermath have had the unintended consequence of undermining the doctrine of "responsibility to protect" (R2P) that was originally used to justify the intervention. Many advocates of intervention believed Western involvement would strengthen the norm that sovereignty may be limited to protect a civilian population from large-scale loss of life. Instead, the Libyan intervention helped discredit that idea.

A key requirement of the "responsibility to protect" is that intervening governments assume the "responsibility to rebuild" in the wake of military action, but this was a responsibility that the intervening governments never wanted and haven't accepted. All of this has proven to skeptical governments, including emerging democratic powers such as Brazil and India, that the doctrine can and will be abused to legitimize military intervention while ignoring its other requirements. The Libyan experience has soured many major governments around the world on R2P, and without their support in the future, it will become little more than a façade for the preferred policies of Western governments.

http://theweek.com/bullpen/column/225833/a-year-later-libya-is-still-a-mess

12 replies, 1168 views

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Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
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Arrow 12 replies Author Time Post
Reply A year later, Libya is still a mess (Original post)
TomClash Mar 2012 OP
KG Mar 2012 #1
TomClash Mar 2012 #2
Puzzledtraveller Mar 2012 #8
Amonester Mar 2012 #9
riverwalker Mar 2012 #3
EFerrari Mar 2012 #5
SoCalDem Mar 2012 #4
EFerrari Mar 2012 #7
Swamp Lover Mar 2012 #12
Snake Alchemist Mar 2012 #6
Shankapotomus Mar 2012 #10
EFerrari Mar 2012 #11

Response to TomClash (Original post)

Thu Mar 22, 2012, 01:46 PM

1. who could've known?

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Response to KG (Reply #1)

Thu Mar 22, 2012, 02:30 PM

2. Not the DU Cheerleaders

They lusted for war and now they are gone.

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Response to TomClash (Reply #2)

Thu Mar 22, 2012, 02:43 PM

8. To some, being antiwar only applies..

when a republican is on office. You should know that by now.

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Response to TomClash (Reply #2)

Thu Mar 22, 2012, 02:43 PM

9. Waiting for 'after' the 'elections' there.

We'll see.

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Response to TomClash (Original post)

Thu Mar 22, 2012, 02:30 PM

3. common sense 101

1. The author, Daniel Larison, is not Libyan. 2. Do I give any credence to what a guy in Chicago feels about the situation in Libya? No. If I want to learn about the the situation in Libya, I will listen to those who live there now, and under Gaddafi.
Larison seems to be concerned as well with Russia losing influence in Syria. Hardly an objective observer.

"Daniel Larison is a Ph.D. graduate from the University of Chicago, where he recently completed his dissertation on the sixth ecumenical council and the monothelete controversy. A convert to Orthodox Christianity since 2003, he serves as a reader at a local Russian Orthodox parish in the Chicago area. He is contributing editor at The American Conservative and writes a column for The Week online. His work has also appeared in The Dallas Morning News, The New Pantagruel and at Takimag.com. He writes on the blog Eunomia."

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Response to riverwalker (Reply #3)

Thu Mar 22, 2012, 02:34 PM

5. Aside from attacking the author, have you any counter evidence

that Libya is not a mess in the hands of militias, that torture is systemic there and that it is exporting weapons all over the region?

I'd like to see that.

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Response to TomClash (Original post)

Thu Mar 22, 2012, 02:33 PM

4. In 1812, the USA was not in great shape

and in many other years after the war of independence

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Response to SoCalDem (Reply #4)

Thu Mar 22, 2012, 02:39 PM

7. In 1812, the US was not in the hands of Britain's puppets

and the sale of its resources wasn't taking precedence over the welfare of the populace.

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Response to SoCalDem (Reply #4)

Thu Mar 22, 2012, 03:48 PM

12. Good point.

 

Wasted on those who will not hear.

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Response to TomClash (Original post)

Thu Mar 22, 2012, 02:34 PM

6. But oil is flowing. nt

 

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Response to TomClash (Original post)

Thu Mar 22, 2012, 02:45 PM

10. You mean, they haven't reached the moon yet?

What the hell is taking them? The Gahdaffi regime was ended months ago.

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Response to Shankapotomus (Reply #10)

Thu Mar 22, 2012, 02:57 PM

11. Libya ruler speaks out against militia power

Libya ruler speaks out against militia power

TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) — The head of Libya's interim government said Sunday that militias should not control government buildings or institutions, speaking on a day that clashes between a powerful militia and Tripoli residents killed at least one person.

Mustafa Abdul-Jalil told The Associated Press that the country's many militias must be disarmed and said his government does not want them in control of state facilities.

His plea could not be backed up by action. The central government in Libya has proved incapable of governing or protecting the country's vital institutions since the capture and killing of longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi in October.

With the collapse of central authority in Libya, militias and tribes have been acting on their own, exacting revenge on foes and enforcing security in their areas with little coordination or accountability to the Tripoli government.

Associated PressBy RAMI AL-SHAHEIBI | Associated Press – Sun, Mar 18, 2012
http://news.yahoo.com/libya-ruler-speaks-against-militia-power-202142800.html

What's the matter with this guy? Why won't he give the revolution a chance?

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