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Fri Sep 20, 2013, 02:02 AM

 

The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery

The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery

The map, which shades counties based on the percentage of total inhabitants who were enslaved, shows what a range there was in levels of Southern enslavement. Some counties, the map explains, “appear comparatively light … this arises from the preponderance of whites and free blacks in the large towns in these counties.” The population of Orleans Parish, La., in one example, was 8.9 percent enslaved. Places that were rural but were located in mountainous areas devoid of plantations were similarly light-shaded: The people of Harlan County, Ky., were 2.3 percent enslaved.

Meanwhile, a dark belt of counties bordering the Mississippi River held more than 70 percent of their residents in slavery, with Tensas Parish, La., at 90.8 percent and Washington County, Miss., at 92.3 percent.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_vault/2013/09/04/abraham_lincoln_the_president_used_this_map_to_see_where_slavery_was_strongest.html?wpisrc=obnetwork


30 replies, 2027 views

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Reply The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery (Original post)
coldmountain Sep 2013 OP
cthulu2016 Sep 2013 #1
coldmountain Sep 2013 #2
truebluegreen Sep 2013 #10
nadinbrzezinski Sep 2013 #3
Art_from_Ark Sep 2013 #4
Spitfire of ATJ Sep 2013 #5
JustAnotherGen Sep 2013 #7
truebluegreen Sep 2013 #11
Veruca Salt Sep 2013 #13
Spitfire of ATJ Sep 2013 #16
Spitfire of ATJ Sep 2013 #14
McDiggy Sep 2013 #17
Spitfire of ATJ Sep 2013 #18
McDiggy Sep 2013 #19
Spitfire of ATJ Sep 2013 #20
theHandpuppet Sep 2013 #23
hfojvt Sep 2013 #25
MFM008 Sep 2013 #27
Spitfire of ATJ Sep 2013 #28
BumRushDaShow Sep 2013 #6
HereSince1628 Sep 2013 #8
theHandpuppet Sep 2013 #9
Adsos Letter Sep 2013 #24
NCTraveler Sep 2013 #12
McDiggy Sep 2013 #15
MineralMan Sep 2013 #21
MineralMan Sep 2013 #22
gopiscrap Sep 2013 #26
KamaAina Sep 2013 #29
Hayabusa Sep 2013 #30

Response to coldmountain (Original post)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 02:07 AM

1. Interesting. thanks

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Response to cthulu2016 (Reply #1)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 02:20 AM

2. Here's the chilling part

 

"Schulten writes that President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map even appears in the familiar Francis Bicknell Carpenter portrait First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln, visible leaning against a wall in the lower right-hand corner of the room."

http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_vault/2013/09/04/abraham_lincoln_the_president_used_this_map_to_see_where_slavery_was_strongest.html?wpisrc=obnetwork

It always is infuriating when apologists for the Confederacy say the war was about states rights, instead of about slavery when it was a county by county battle against slavery.

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Response to coldmountain (Reply #2)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 08:53 AM

10. The War of Northern Aggression

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Response to coldmountain (Original post)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 02:47 AM

3. Look at this from the 2012 election



The heavy slave counties are these days heavier blue counties.

There are reasons for that. Cultural geography is one thing that fascinates me.

(I need sleep I think)

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Response to coldmountain (Original post)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 03:24 AM

4. That is a fascinating map

Especially as it pertains to Arkansas. I'm surprised there were any slaves at all in Newton, Searcy, Carroll, and Madison counties, which are all in the Ozarks. The only Arkansas state legislator who voted not to secede in 1861 was from Madison County.

It's also interesting to see how county boundaries have changed, and how new ones were added after that map was made. After the Civil War, Arkansas got Grant and Lincoln counties, and to offset those, I guess, a Lee County as well. There was also a new county added called Baxter, in honor of the Reconstruction governor who was Arkansas's last Republican governor until Winthrop Rockefeller was elected in 1966.

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Response to coldmountain (Original post)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 04:29 AM

5. This map explains the panic to gerrymander the South in particular...

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Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #5)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 06:50 AM

7. Very interesting

Thanks for this. Lays it out pretty clearly eh? Hope folks who have poo pooed our concerns over the first step in dismantling the VRA are paying attention now.

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Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #5)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 08:59 AM

11. Who knew there were so many Germans?

And where are the Scots? And what are "Americans"?

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Response to truebluegreen (Reply #11)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 09:46 AM

13. I too want to know what Americans are

at first I thought Native Americans until I saw the listing for them.

Ah found the article that's from. Some people commented that the large swath of "Americans" are likely Scots and Irish. The article notes these are people who claimed this for political reasons or due to not knowing their ethnicity. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2408591/American-ethnicity-map-shows-melting-pot-ethnicities-make-USA-today.html

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Response to Veruca Salt (Reply #13)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 11:34 AM

16. That's not all that they don't know....

Some who come here don't know if they have carpeting.

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Response to truebluegreen (Reply #11)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 11:16 AM

14. "what are "Americans"?"

Dumbasses who think Jesus was a local product.

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Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #14)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 11:39 AM

17. Want to know the real reason?

A lot of people in Appalachia just don't put any importance on their ancestry. When I grew up, I had no concept of "ancestry." Sure, I knew the Europeans came over, etc, etc. But nobody put any importance on it. Nobody went around saying "I'm Irish" or "I'm Italian." An Irish person was born and raised in Ireland to us. Born and raised in America? Well, you're an American. I didn't know my last name was Scottish until I moved to the Philadelphia area and someone told me it was. I just never cared.

To be quite honest, I find it incredibly odd that people on the East Coast put so much emphasis on where their great great great grandparents came from.

If you read Jim Webb's book about the American Scots-Irish, Born Fighting, he actually explains this mentality a lot.

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Response to McDiggy (Reply #17)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 11:46 AM

18. Uh huh. But everybody knew "those people" came from Africa.

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Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #18)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 11:49 AM

19. ...?

Yeah, I'm pretty sure most people know white folks predominately had ancestors that came from Europe. Black folks had ancestors from predominately Africa. And your point is?

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Response to McDiggy (Reply #19)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 12:05 PM

20. There was a level of exclusion.

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Response to truebluegreen (Reply #11)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 12:15 PM

23. Many of what you might call "Ulster Scots" are listed as Irish

Not making a political statement here, that's just the way it is. The waves of Scots-Irish who immigrated from Ulster, especially in the early part of the 18th century, are not oft listed as an identity. There were also a lot of early immigrants from Scotland but not as many as those who came from Ulster.

Yep, there are a LOT of folks who come from German stock. I think many downplayed their German ancestry after the world wars. Some even Anglicized their names.

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Response to truebluegreen (Reply #11)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 12:21 PM

25. I would bet that most of the Germans are really mixed

I always claimed German myself, because my last name is German, or sometimes Jewish.

But my dad would be half German and half Swiss. And then his father would be half German and half English, and his mother would be half Swiss and half German. And his German grandfather would be half German and half Scot.

And then my mom would be half Irish and half German. And her father would be half Irish and half English. And her mother all German. And her paternal grandfather all Irish and paternal grandmother half English and half Irish.

So for dad (without going further back and finding some Irish and some French huegenot) 3/8 German, 1/4 English, 1/4 Swiss (German speaking), 1/8 Scot

and for mom 1/2 German, 3/8 Irish, 1/8 English

Thus for me 7/16 German, 3/16 English, 3/16 Irish, 1/8 Swiss, 1/16 Scot. Mostly German, but not all.

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Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #5)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 02:16 PM

27. thats funny

I know very few germans or german ancestors here in WA, most are from UK.

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Response to MFM008 (Reply #27)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 02:23 PM

28. You mean those that don't say, "American"?

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Response to coldmountain (Original post)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 05:53 AM

6. Wow.

Thank you for posting!

Very enlightening in a sad way.

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Response to coldmountain (Original post)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 07:16 AM

8. And sold to the public 'for the benefit of the sick and wounded soldiers'

A map with many uses.

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Response to coldmountain (Original post)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 07:19 AM

9. Fascinating. Thanks for posting this.

There are many reasons this map should be part of textbooks everywhere, especially because it illustrates quite clearly that despite neo-confederate efforts to revise history, the Civil War was driven by a plantation economy that could not be sustained without the evils of slavery -- and it was an economy they very much wanted to spread into the western territories.
You'll note that the light areas in the map are located along the Appalachians, where the plantation economy did not exist. Despite negative stereotyping of Appalachians, they were the most opposed to secession, regarding it as war of wealthy, slave-owning plantation owners, or "flatlanders". In fact, Appalachia was the home for Southern Unionists, where tens of thousands of men from Virginia to Alabama fought as Union troops.
So the next time someone waves the Stars and Bars and defends it as "Southern heritage", this map is a good reminder that the flag of traitors only represents one segment of Southerners and not the millions who were slaves, nor some 100,000 Southern men who fought under the banner of the Stars & Stripes.

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Response to theHandpuppet (Reply #9)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 12:18 PM

24. "The South vs. the South."

The South vs. the South: How Anti-Confederate Southerners Shaped the Course of the Civil War by William W. Freehling

http://www.amazon.com/The-South-Vs-Anti-Confederate-Southerners/dp/0195156293

Excellent book on this very topic. Also a subject in Freehling's Road to Disunion set.

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Response to coldmountain (Original post)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 09:21 AM

12. That is very cool.

I collect maps and have an original 1855 Map by Augustus Petermann Showing the growth of the US according to the 1850 Census. One of the insets is of the slave and non-slave states. I don't have a way to post pics but here is the map I purchased.

http://www.raremaps.com/gallery/detail/30056?view=print

Maps tell such a story of our history.

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Response to coldmountain (Original post)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 11:31 AM

15. You can pretty clearly see why West Virginia broke away from Virginia.

nm

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Response to coldmountain (Original post)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 12:10 PM

21. Thanks for posting that.

First time I'd seen that map. It's telling, especially when compared to current maps in many ways.

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Response to coldmountain (Original post)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 12:11 PM

22. The Map itself:

It's in the public domain, and so can be posted freely.

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Response to coldmountain (Original post)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 12:22 PM

26. wow that was interesting

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Response to coldmountain (Original post)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 02:27 PM

29. See how few counties there were in southern Florida

also, you can trace today's I-81 through Virginia down into Tennessee.

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Response to coldmountain (Original post)

Fri Sep 20, 2013, 02:32 PM

30. Boone County, MO 35%...

Wow...

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