HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » What Are Some of Your Fav...
Introducing Discussionist: A new forum by the creators of DU

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 06:51 PM

What Are Some of Your Favorite Spy Movies


The Bourne series
The Manchurian Candidate - both
The Interpreter

86 replies, 2671 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 86 replies Author Time Post
Reply What Are Some of Your Favorite Spy Movies (Original post)
otohara Aug 2013 OP
Initech Aug 2013 #1
kentauros Aug 2013 #32
Adam051188 Aug 2013 #2
Initech Aug 2013 #16
liberal_at_heart Aug 2013 #26
Initech Aug 2013 #65
Name removed Aug 2013 #70
rdharma Aug 2013 #3
msanthrope Aug 2013 #60
demosincebirth Aug 2013 #4
DevonRex Aug 2013 #13
demosincebirth Aug 2013 #19
DevonRex Aug 2013 #35
DCBob Aug 2013 #20
DevonRex Aug 2013 #37
KoKo Aug 2013 #61
FSogol Aug 2013 #5
reflection Aug 2013 #67
TlalocW Aug 2013 #6
kentauros Aug 2013 #10
CrispyQ Aug 2013 #7
kentauros Aug 2013 #15
CrispyQ Aug 2013 #21
brewens Aug 2013 #8
DevonRex Aug 2013 #9
DCBob Aug 2013 #25
DevonRex Aug 2013 #39
quinnox Aug 2013 #11
liberal_at_heart Aug 2013 #17
quinnox Aug 2013 #18
The Second Stone Aug 2013 #12
kentauros Aug 2013 #14
orpupilofnature57 Aug 2013 #29
NightWatcher Aug 2013 #22
DCBob Aug 2013 #23
Warpy Aug 2013 #24
Egalitarian Thug Aug 2013 #41
BOG PERSON Aug 2013 #45
brewens Aug 2013 #78
orpupilofnature57 Aug 2013 #27
quinnox Aug 2013 #30
KoKo Aug 2013 #75
burnodo Aug 2013 #38
East Coast Pirate Aug 2013 #50
WinkyDink Aug 2013 #28
DCBob Aug 2013 #31
chervilant Aug 2013 #33
quinnox Aug 2013 #34
lumberjack_jeff Aug 2013 #36
greytdemocrat Aug 2013 #40
Egalitarian Thug Aug 2013 #42
railsback Aug 2013 #47
rdharma Aug 2013 #82
ornotna Aug 2013 #64
B Calm Aug 2013 #43
otohara Aug 2013 #44
BOG PERSON Aug 2013 #46
TexasProgresive Aug 2013 #48
longship Aug 2013 #49
otohara Aug 2013 #72
longship Aug 2013 #74
KoKo Aug 2013 #77
The Velveteen Ocelot Aug 2013 #51
FarCenter Aug 2013 #52
Graybeard Aug 2013 #66
Revanchist Aug 2013 #53
GreatCaesarsGhost Aug 2013 #54
rrneck Aug 2013 #55
Demo_Chris Aug 2013 #56
Mc Mike Aug 2013 #73
East Coast Pirate Aug 2013 #57
Recursion Aug 2013 #80
Graybeard Aug 2013 #58
Art_from_Ark Aug 2013 #59
no_hypocrisy Aug 2013 #62
Nay Aug 2013 #63
CrispyQ Aug 2013 #68
ananda Aug 2013 #69
Name removed Aug 2013 #71
Marr Aug 2013 #76
Recursion Aug 2013 #79
Zorra Aug 2013 #81
bhcodem Aug 2013 #83
CBGLuthier Aug 2013 #84
KoKo Aug 2013 #85
KoKo Aug 2013 #86

Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 06:57 PM

1. If you like TV shows I highly recommend Archer and Burn Notice.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Initech (Reply #1)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:36 PM

32. Oh come on!

You've got to include Brock Samson!





Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)


Response to Adam051188 (Reply #2)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:19 PM

16. The Daniel Craig films have all been great as well.

Say what you want about Quantum Of Solace, but I thought it was enjoyable, but Casino Royal and Skyfall are among the best Bond movies I've seen, and I've seen them all.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Initech (Reply #16)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:28 PM

26. I agree. Casino Royal and especially Skyfall were wonderful. I have a crush on Daniel Craig.

I've always had a thing for men with broad shoulders and blue eyes.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to liberal_at_heart (Reply #26)

Tue Aug 20, 2013, 12:35 AM

65. Skyfall really makes me want to visit Beijing and Macau.


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Adam051188 (Reply #2)


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:03 PM

3. "Erased"

 

Smart, realistic, and suspenseful. Good soundtrack too (same guy that did The Interpreter soundtrack).

I only saw the first in the Bourne series. Pretty good too.

I haven't seen The Interpreter yet.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to rdharma (Reply #3)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 10:31 PM

60. I just saw that on Netflix...and liked it. nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:04 PM

4. "The Man who came in from the cold." Many here too young to remember that one.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to demosincebirth (Reply #4)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:15 PM

13. It's The Spy Who... Also a novel by the real spy, le Carre.

Real name, David John Moore Cornwell.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DevonRex (Reply #13)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:21 PM

19. Thanks for the correction. Richard Burton. Right?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to demosincebirth (Reply #19)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 08:04 PM

35. Yes. Such a handsome Alex Leamas.

Le Carre's novels are so very real. They deserve great actors. Burton. Such a talent.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DevonRex (Reply #13)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:22 PM

20. Yep... that was a real spy movie.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DCBob (Reply #20)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 08:07 PM

37. Yes. *sigh*

And here we're headed right back into the thick of it. Fucking Putin. I've despised him since the 80s.

Oh well. Le Carre will have new material.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to demosincebirth (Reply #4)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 10:42 PM

61. Any Michael Cain Spy Movie...Harry Palmer etc. LINK for his Good Stuff:

http://spywise.blogspot.com/2007/06/spy-ography-of-michael-caine.html

A Spy-ography of Michael Caine
From Harry Palmer to Austin Powers: A Spy-ography of Michael Caine


By Wesley Britton

Who's the Number One Film Spy of all time? Without question, Bond, James Bond. But who's the Number One Spy ACTOR of All Time? Ah, that's a different question.

Hmm. Sean Connery immediately springs to mind. Seven Bond films alone. He also had significant roles in Tom Clancey's Hunt for Red October and John Le Carre's Russia House (both 1990). He didn’t fare as well in outings like The Avengers (1998) and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (2003). All this places him in the first rank of moviehouse spies, far ahead of Roger Moore who also starred in seven 007 films along with a few "Saint" outings, only one of which can be considered espionage-oriented (being The Fiction Makers in 1966). Anyone else?

For my ticket price, one name stands out as being the man unquestionably involved in more quality spy projects than anyone else. Michael Caine. He turned out to be the spy for all seasons based on determination, talent, and a bit of luck. And perfect timing.

The Season for Spies

As every spy buff knows, the mid-60s was the zenith of interest in cinematic espionage. So actors like Sean Connery, Roger Moore, and Michael Caine were part of a generation of actors caught up in the wave of Bond and Bond-inspired films that began with Dr. No (1962). As a result, Caine had 007 connections even before the spy boom. For example, he made friends with Sean Connery before either of them had film success, the two meeting and dining together when Connery sang in a chorus line for a production of South Pacific. According to Caine's autobiography, the producer Josh Logan wanted burly men for realism in the men singing "There is Nothing Like a Dame.” So the call went out for bodybuilders, which is what Connery was doing at the time. Shortly after, Caine and Connery worked together on a British TV film, Requiem for a Heavyweight.

Then, Caine recalled meeting Roger Moore in 1960 on a street outside a theatre. At the time, Caine was starring in the single drama for the BBC, The Compartment. According to Caine, the slightly older Moore, then famous in England for his leading role in the TV series, Ivanhoe, approached him and complimented his work in The Compartment. "After 30 years of friendship with Roger," Caine wrote in 1992, "I can still count the differences between us on one hand, several of which were apparent that first time we met. He was famous, handsome, elegant, and generous. I was obscure, ugly, scruffy, and mean. I have caught up with him since on at least two counts. And two out of four is not bad." (Caine 45) (note 1)

Several other Bond connections occurred that helped Caine's start in films. In 1964, he appeared in his first movie, Zulu, a film scored by Bond composer John Barry. Shortly after Zulu's premiere, Caine went to dinner at the London Pickwick restaurant. He later wrote that, "in the two minutes that changed my life," Bond producer Harry Saltzman was also in the Pickwick. Saltzman, of course, was half of the production team that had brought us Dr. No, From Russia With Love, and the next film then in the pipeline, Goldfinger. Looking for another project, Saltzman had bought the rights to the novels of Len Deighton and made it clear he wanted a spy quite different from Sean Connery. A thinking man's spy, a character who doesn't always get the girls, a secret agent nervous around guns. A spy who doesn't want to be a spy at all. Who would be this new secret agent?

Well, Saltzman had seen Zulu and called Caine over to his table. Saltzman--no master of small talk, in Caine's opinion--liked the acting in Zulu. He asked Caine not only to star in his forthcoming The Ipcress File, but if Caine was interested in a seven year contract. Yes, were Caine's answers. Had he read Deighton's first novel, The Ipcress File? Yes, Caine answered, halfway through the novel. Short answers to small talk that changed his life.

THE "WORKING CLASS" SPY

As it happened, Caine hadn't been Saltzman's first choice. That honor had gone to Christopher Plummer who'd opted to co-star with Julie Andrews in The Sound of Music instead. (later, Plummer worked with Caine and Sean Connery in 1975s The Man Who Would Be King.) After getting the nod, Caine found becoming Harry Palmer an exciting opportunity. During early preparations for The Ipcress File, Caine briefly roomed with composer John Barry. He remembers one night when he heard Barry banging on the piano all night, keeping him awake. In the morning, the actor learned he was the first person to hear the theme to Goldfinger.

Another roommate was actor Terence Stamp who had a friend who had a friend who stopped by with a noticeable Russian accent. Several days later, agents of MI5 came calling to find out if Caine was a friend of the Russian. Turned out, he was a Soviet agent involved in the notorious Profumo affaire. Caine learned the Communist spy returned to the Soviet Union where he was shot a few weeks later. Caine thought this interesting if unintentional research for his upcoming role. (note 2)

In many ways, The Ipcress File, the first "Harry Palmer” film released in 1965, established the formula for much of the success of Michael Caine. As discussed in my Beyond Bond: Spies in Film and Fiction (2005):

"Palmer was a working class hero pulled into the world of intrigue, Responsible to people outside of his class and whom he did not trust. According to Lars Sauerberg, Palmer's character was miles apart from those of both Fleming and Le Carre who both used gentlemen of one breed or another; Deighton used a spy with an ironic attitude about the world around him (1984 65).

“Palmer didn't wish to operate like a gentleman and said he didn't like chess as he preferred games in which it was easier to cheat. Unlike Commander Bond of the British Royal Navy, Palmer was a Sergeant in the Army. He preferred tea to alcohol. He didn't report to an Admiral but rather Colonel Ross who saw his agent as `insubordinate, insolent, and prone to criminal tendencies.' 007 and Palmer shared one interest--gourmet food, although Palmer was as interested in cooking as eating. One secret meeting with his boss was in a grocery store, the one area he showed mastery of. His one high-brow taste was for classical music, a devotion Bond never showed interest in." (note 3)

While he didn't make the connection himself, this role was an extension of what Michael Caine felt about the "Swinging London" of the 1960s. According to his 1992 memoirs, in every endeavor from music to fashion to film, the '60s was a time when the British working class came into its own--"We are here." The Cockney Michael Caine (born in south London in 1933) was ideal to play the rebellious "Everyman" undercover agent. He too came from the poorer working class and, at the age of 31, had waited a long time for success in acting. Describing himself as ambitious and tough (he'd seen London bombed in World War II as a child and had seen combat in North Korea), Caine had both a drive and experience that gave depth to his on-screen performances. During a turbulent decade when one generation openly resented what was known as "The Establishment," a fictional secret agent who reflected similar attitudes easily struck a cord in movie goers. As Harry Palmer, and in later spy films, Caine thrived as an intelligent loner who, while not happy about being pulled into nasty business, often outthought and outmaneuvered adversaries and superiors alike. In short, at the beginning of his spy career, Caine was perfectly cast for a certain kind of spy.

As all readers of Len Deighton novels know, the character in the "Harry Palmer" books had no name in the novels. According to the actor, Saltzman, Caine, and others working on the film sat around one evening thinking of a name for the film version. Saltzman wanted the spy to be an ordinary man able to disappear in crowds, so he should have an ordinary name. "Harry," suggested Caine--before realizing he might have offended his new boss. But Saltzman quickly agreed, saying the most boring person he'd ever known was named Palmer. So Harry Palmer began to shape.

Again in the early stages, Caine's own attributes helped define the character. Saltzman liked the fact he wore eyeglasses, saying most actors don't and didn't know how to use them in film. In addition, eyeglasses made people look more ordinary. Caine liked the idea of wearing eyeglasses as this was something that would be part of the character of Harry Palmer and would help the actor not be too closely identified with Palmer, like Connery was becoming with Bond. In future roles, Caine could simply take off his eyeware to be someone different.

In discussions with Len Deighton, it was decided to make Palmer a spy who seduced women by cooking for them. Combining the eyeglass image with cooking, the girl (Sue Lloyd) would take the glasses off--making Palmer a sexual male. Palmer's creator, Len Deighton, also helped influence the movie incarnation of the narrator of his books. As Deighton was writing a cooking strip appearing in the London Observer, copies of this strip were plastered on the walls of Harry Palmer's kitchen. One trick the spy used, cracking two eggs together with one-hand, was beyond Caine's ability. Viewers of the film might notice Palmer's hands have dark hairs in that shot and not the blond follicles of Michael Caine--they were the hands of Len Deighton.


The Harry Palmer Sequels

After the dual success of The Ipcress File and the comedy Alfie, 32 year old Caine returned to playing Harry Palmer in Funeral in Berlin (1966). (Alfie, surprisingly, had two Bond connections. Harry Saltzman helped get Caine the role and the director was Lewis Gilbert, later responsible for one Connery and two Roger Moore 007 outings.) The director for Berlin was Guy Hamilton, a former intelligence officer fresh off with his success with Goldfinger. In Caine's view, Hamilton was more at home with the shaken cocktails of Bond than the gritty realism of Berlin. (note 4) Caine thought the actual German city had a special, mysterious ambiance which wasn't captured in the movie. During filming, he recalled, East German guards deliberately flashed lights into the camera lens, forcing the crew to move from Berlin Wall locations. As Checkpoint Charlie wasn't available to the company, a set had to be built nearby.

Location shooting was a different challenge for the third Harry Palmer project, Billion Dollar Brain (1967). Directed by the more spectacle-oriented Ken Russell, some scenes were shot in Helsinki, Finland, and the crew had to be careful on the ice on the waters. Caine felt the plot was obscure and, by the time the film was finished, the story would befuddle Einstein. Still, the movie had its moments and one clever twist. In the 1950s, anti-Red films had red-blooded Yanks as valiant heroes fighting the Soviet tide. In Brain, the deranged American general was spouting the same old rhetoric, but was now a nutcase battled by the British and Russians together. Times were changing.

“A nice polish, but getting old. Just like you.”
(Michael Caine’s Harry Palmer describing a fellow spy’s car in Funeral In Berlin.)

In subsequent decades, Caine starred in other important spy films, even if he didn't always like the results. Without question, Caine's on-screen film success as a secret agent has been uneven. In 1974, he starred in director Don Siegel's The Black Windmill. Audience and critical response has been mixed regarding this tale of an espionage agent (Caine) who finds his government won't help when his son is kidnapped and the ransom is diamonds. The script was based on a book by Clive Egleton, Seven Days to a Killing.

In the same decade, Caine was part of the ensemble cast in The Eagle Has Landed (1976), a film based on the important Jack Higgins' novel. (The cast included Donald Sutherland, another actor who has a legacy of many memorable roles in spy films.) (note 5) While Eagle earned high praise when it debuted, time has not been kind to a script that left out much that made the source material a landmark in espionage fiction. In Caine's opinion, the movie, filmed on the banks of the Themes, wasn’t bad, but suffered from a disinterested director, John Sturges. Apparently, Sturges only accepted work when he needed funds to go deep sea fishing. He didn't stick around to help with the editing and post-production process, an important task for directors.

The Jigsaw Man

Of course, as the years went by, the roles had to change. In the '60s, Caine could be the "angry young man": by films such as The Jigsaw Man (1983), Caine was becoming an elder statesman in spycraft. In this lackluster film, Caine co-starred with fellow veteran Laurence Olivier in a story about a British-Russian double-agent sent to England to retrieve a list of Soviet agents he'd left behind years before. According to Pete Stampede, “one of the reasons why The Jigsaw Man turned out to be such a mess was that it ran out of money halfway through, one of the principal investors being Johnson Matthey, a subsequently disgraced merchant banking corporation. In Britain it went straight to video, one of the first
films to do so despite the cast, and I think this may have been to write it
down as a tax loss or something. Laurence Olivier collapsed during its
making and had a team of nurses on hand throughout.”

http://spywise.blogspot.com/2007/06/spy-ography-of-michael-caine.html
But even in the '80s, Caine could still be an "Everyman" secret agent. In the excellent The Holcroft Covenant (1985), Caine played a naďve architect who found himself in the middle of a plot to re-invigorate the Nazi movement. Again starring in a role created by a master story-teller--in this case, Robert Ludlum--Caine contributed to a project distinguished by fast-paced direction, witty dialogue, and largely fine performances by the supporting cast. He played the innocent civilian who triumphs by guile, a savvy knack for reading human behavior, and a clear streak of decency and belief in just moral values.

However, Caine didn't like the film. He signed on as the director was to be John Frankenheimer, the man behind one of Caine's favorite films, The Manchurian Canidate. At first, James Caan was to play Holcroft but pulled out at the last minute. Caine was in wardrobe before he ever saw the script which he found incomprehensible. Well, sometimes actors aren't the best judge of their work.

Even when Caine played a professional spy, he typically demonstrated human dimensions in his characters. Such a classic performance was in novelist Frederick Forsythe's The Fourth Protocol (1987) in which Caine was pitted against future 007 Pierce Brosnan. Directed by John Mackenzie, who'd worked with Caine in Graham Greene's Honorary Consul, this suspenseful duel between professionals had Caine as the defender of his English homeland against the amoral plot by the Russians to heat up the Cold War. Again, Caine's character was more investigator than action-adventure hero who, in the last minutes, protests when Bronsan's KGB killer is shot and accuses his superiors of mixed motives. Even though he was associate producer for the film, Caine dismissed it in his memoirs precisely because it was a British film which "talked too much" and lacked the big-screen action so important to Hollywood success. Nothing else in his career could be more ironic--the James Bond films had long since been turned into special effects, minimal dialogue action escapism. Caine, the "thinking man's spy" in the guise of Harry Palmer, now wanted more Bond in his scripts.

Return of Harry Palmer

But nowhere was change more evident than in two 1995 films, Bullet to Beijing and Midnight in St. Petersburg where Caine's Harry Palmer returned. Once, Palmer had been blackmailed into spying for Her Majesty's Government and he didn't like spying on weekends. Now, post-Cold War downsizing forced Palmer into early retirement. In Bullet, Palmer set up his own private investigation agency in Moscow, turns down the seductive wiles of a younger female spy, and mentors a young protegee played by Jason Connnery, son of Sean. (And possibly the son of Palmer, if Connery's on-screen supposition is correct). (note 7) Not quite the big-splash type of movies Caine mentioned in his discussion of The Fourth Protocol, but quite decent fare for spy buffs interested in plot, character development, and good casting.

The Quiet American

Far from the Bond breed of spy, Caine starred in the highly regarded 2002 remake of The Quiet American, the first Hollywood movie to be filmed in Vietnam with the blessings of the Communist government. In this second adaptation of Graham Greene's 1955 novel, Caine played the jaded journalist Fowler "in a performance that seems to descend perfectly formed. There is no artifice in it, no unneeded energy, no tricks, no effort. It is there." (Ebert) According to critic Roger Ebert, "The film is narrated by Caine's character, in that conversational voice weary with wisdom; we are reminded of the tired cynicism of the opening narration in the great film of Greene's The Third Man."

In commentary for the DVD release, director Philip Noyce said Caine was cast as Fowler because he was an actor who could bring humanity and trust to a character that could be a potential problem for audiences. After all, Fowler was an older, married man involved with a much younger girl (19 years old). Casting Brenden Fraser as the third part of the romantic triangle was problematic as, in the novel, Alden Pyle was largely a polemic figure who spouted off idealistic phrases without much character depth. When a bomb he plants kills innocent civilians instead of a military parade, Greene's Pyle simply believes the cause of democracy must include such "collateral damage." All involved said this was the major change between novel and film, giving Fraser a more rounded character so he could be something of an equal with Caine for dramatic purposes. Actual CIA agents were brought in to make him more flesh-and-blood. (note 8)

As it turned out, the first test screenings of the movie in New York took place the night before 9/11. Not surprisingly, Merrimax distributors became reluctant to release a film with violence that would turn off movie goers in the U.S. (In Viet Nam, ticket sales were destroyed not because of public disfavor, but because so many bootleg copies became available with poor quality videos being sold outside of theatres.) But Michael Caine intervened with Harvey Weinstein at Merrimax to show The Quiet American at film festivals where critical response was high.



What is the formula for Michael Caine's success in spy films? For one matter, he's had the luck to work in movies based on books by some of espionage's finest storytellers--Len Deighton, Graham Greene, Robert Ludlum, Frederick Forsythe, Jack Higgins. He's worked with top directors and stellar co-stars from Robert Duvall to Laurence Olivier. And, while not a classically trained actor, Caine has been a consummate professional praised by his co-workers, critics, and audiences.

That is, when the films were good, and they often were. But beyond the seemingly obvious, Michael Caine has been fortunate to find roles geared for an actor more suitable for believable, accessible characters instead of movies relying more on spectacle and stunts than scripts. Beyond those eyeglasses, a mind was at work whether ferreting out traitors in his own department in The Ipcress File or learning he was a pawn in a larger game as in The Holcroft Covenant. So I nominate him for the "All-Time Movie Star Spy" and hearby swear him to secrecy about this award. I wouldn't want to blow his cover. Mike Myers might be plotting a sequel.


http://spywise.blogspot.com/2007/06/spy-ography-of-michael-caine.html

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:07 PM

5. The Eiger Sanction. n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to FSogol (Reply #5)

Tue Aug 20, 2013, 09:58 AM

67. Yes.

Outstanding film.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:07 PM

6. Sneakers

It's on the edge of the genre, but it's there.

Mother (Dan Aykroyd) "Cattle mutilations are up."
Donald (Sidney Poitier) "Don't..."

TlalocW

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to TlalocW (Reply #6)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:12 PM

10. That's a great one!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:07 PM

7. Not sure all these qualify as spy movies.

Three Days of the Condor
Spy Games
Hit Man
Suspect Zero

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to CrispyQ (Reply #7)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:18 PM

15. I'd say if it involves any of the "secret services" as part of the main plot,

then those movies qualify.

I know a lot of people can't stand Kevin Costner, but I loved the movie "No Way Out"

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kentauros (Reply #15)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:23 PM

21. Thanks, I'll check it out.

I'm not crazy about him, but he was great in Mr. Brooks, not a spy movie.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:08 PM

8. Hopscotch with Walter Mathau and Ned Beattey. Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy. the mini series

is better than the movie. There are lots but those two are great.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:11 PM

9. Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy. Written by a spy - le Carre.

The Honorable Schoolboy. Smiley's People. The Night Manager. Our Kind of Traitor. You have to read the books.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DevonRex (Reply #9)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:27 PM

25. Thats one of my favorites.

I love the references to "Moscow Rules".

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DCBob (Reply #25)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 08:10 PM

39. Oh, so do I!!

Someone good needs to remake Tailor of Panama. Just to get that horrific cast out of my brain. But I hereby veto the new Bond guy. No no no. <-- English, Spanish, Italian, etc. Nyet nyet nyet.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:13 PM

11. I also love the Bourne movies, especially the Bourne ultimatum, which I consider to be a masterpiece

 

I also really liked the more recent "Salt" (2010) with Angelina Jolie.

How could I forget, I also absolutely loved the more recent spy thriller "Hanna" (2011). Check it out if you haven't seen it.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to quinnox (Reply #11)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:20 PM

17. oh, my gosh I completey forgot about Hanna. I loved that movie.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to liberal_at_heart (Reply #17)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:21 PM

18. same here, amazing film

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:13 PM

12. Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy

Both the BBC version with Alec Guiness and the recent Gary Oldman movie are fantastic. Another one I really like for spy material is the movie Midway, which has a bit of spy stuff in it.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:16 PM

14. Spy parodies with James Coburn:

Our Man Flint
In Like Flint
The President's Analyst


And a British parody with Sir Alec Guinness, Our Man in Havana (it's got Ernie Kovaks in it, too!)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kentauros (Reply #14)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:33 PM

29. Love James Coburn in those movies !!!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:23 PM

22. The Falcon and the Snowman, Sneakers, Spygame, The Recruit was ok

When I got my first security clearance, they showed our class the Falcon and the Snowman. I think they did it with a wink wink

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:25 PM

23. The Russia House.

Another le Carre.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:26 PM

24. "Hopscotch"

Hands down, best spy movie ever.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0080889/

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Warpy (Reply #24)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 08:13 PM

41. Oh hell yes. n/t

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Warpy (Reply #24)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 08:25 PM

45. good one n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Warpy (Reply #24)

Tue Aug 20, 2013, 10:31 PM

78. Watch it again if you've only seen it once. Ned Beattys office kills me! On one wall

he's got a huge picture of himself with his revolver drawing a bead. Directly opposite a target from the practice range with a tight grouping! Then the pictures of himself with different big shots. He's awesome in that!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:32 PM

27. ' Three Days of the Condor ' 1975

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to orpupilofnature57 (Reply #27)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:33 PM

30. good one, I think I saw it a long time ago when I was a kid

 

I am going to have to rent it again.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to quinnox (Reply #30)

Tue Aug 20, 2013, 10:05 PM

75. Definitely...there's much that fits our time!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to orpupilofnature57 (Reply #27)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 08:08 PM

38. +1

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to orpupilofnature57 (Reply #27)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 09:09 PM

50. My choice

 

The end of the movie where Cliff Robertson talks about it all being about oil is classic.

Max Von Sydow and Faye Dunaway were very good in this movie.

Well worth watching again.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:33 PM

28. All SC Bonds; "Stalag 17"; "North By Northwest"; "Eye of the Needle."

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:34 PM

31. Breach.

Just saw this last weekend. This is about John Hanssen, the FBI mole for the Soviet Union. Its pretty good.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:42 PM

33. Enemy of the State

Somewhat prescient, methinks.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to chervilant (Reply #33)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 07:42 PM

34. that is a pretty good one too

 

I forgot about that one.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 08:05 PM

36. Bourne movies for sure. n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 08:13 PM

40. You forget...




Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to greytdemocrat (Reply #40)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 08:17 PM

42. I never forget the coolest guy who ever lived. He used to give cool lessons

 

to Frank & Sammy both.

He's so cool, they didn't even have to put his picture in the dictionary under cool.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to greytdemocrat (Reply #40)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 08:30 PM

47. Flint would have kicked Helm's ass

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to railsback (Reply #47)

Tue Aug 20, 2013, 11:16 PM

82. You've got mail......

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to greytdemocrat (Reply #40)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 11:31 PM

64. The coolest spy

With the coolest ladies. Dalia Lavi and Stella Stevens

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 08:19 PM

43. My favorite are the Bourne series

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 08:24 PM

44. Breach, The Robert Hanson Story

Last edited Mon Aug 19, 2013, 10:17 PM - Edit history (1)

selling secrets to the Russians ...
Chris Cooper was amazing

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 08:28 PM

46. "The Conversation" (1974)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 08:41 PM

48. Ipcress File (1965)— and sequels with Michael Caine n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 08:59 PM

49. Lots of good posts here.

From Russia, With Love. My favorite Bond: no doubt about it. All other Bonds pale in comparison. It has Robert Shaw as a particularly devious baddy. Lotte Lenya as Rosa Krebs! A voice dubbed Daniela Bianchi as Tatiana Romanova. Then there's Pedro Armendáriz, dying of cancer, as Karem Bey, the Turkish station chief. (Terrance Young rushed his scenes in deference to his nearly always painful condition. He was replaced by stand-ins in some scenes and shortly took his own life to avoid a painful death.) This is classic Bond. It has never been surpassed, IMHO. The Istanbul filmed scenes are wonderful. The gypsy camp scene is the film's only arguable fault. Introduced many iconic Bond idioms. Ernst Blofeld. Q. The iconic romantic epilogue. Plus, it has an iconic tangled plot.

North by Northwest. What can one say about this one? It's a movie without a plot. That alone makes it iconic in the spy genre. It also is an iconic example of a MacGuffin, a plot device of absolutely no importance to the narrative, but around which the plot revolves. This is a Seinfeldian flick, a movie about nothing. It's how one gets there that matters. Many stand-outs in the cast, Martin Landau is chilling as James Mason's character gay secretary. Of course, it has Cary Grant and an awesome Eva Marie Saint. And yes, it has a Hitchcockian kiss scene. Beautifully filmed and with a dynamite climax. The measure of good cinema is when one can watch a movie over and over again. This is one of those desert island movies.

Hopscotch. Ronald Neame's wonderful spy spoof, the best of that genre. Brought off brilliantly by Walter Matthau and Glenda Jackson with a good supporting cast, especially Sam Waterston, Ned Beatty, and Herbert Lom. This is an unabashed vehicle for Matthau/Jackson who had acted together previously and have an obvious chemistry. One never knows how much of the dialog is scripted. (This is Eleanor Roosevelt.) This is a fun romp from beginning to end in spite of the fact that one has the feeling that it's going off the rails. Maybe that what makes it so much fun. Director Neame wisely lets it go off the rails.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to longship (Reply #49)

Tue Aug 20, 2013, 05:25 PM

72. Looking Forward to Hopscotch

it's on Netflix

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Reply #72)

Tue Aug 20, 2013, 07:25 PM

74. It was released by Criterion Collection.

Which I snapped up when they did that.

Love that Mozart is a supporting character, if only in audio. Matthau's character -- and apparently Matthau himself -- likes Wolfgang Amadeus.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Reply #72)

Tue Aug 20, 2013, 10:14 PM

77. It's delightful...and upbeat ....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 09:20 PM

51. No Way Out

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 09:28 PM

52. North by Northwest and Notorious

and Gorky Park

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to FarCenter (Reply #52)

Tue Aug 20, 2013, 09:50 AM

66. More Hitchcock spy flicks.

Saboteur
Foreign Correspondent
Torn Curtain
Topaz
The Man Who Knew Too Much
.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 09:36 PM

53. Not a movie but the FX series The Americans

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 09:38 PM

54. The Quiller Memorandum

George Segal. Alec Guiness, Max Von Sydow, Senta Berger 1966

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 09:48 PM

55. Agree on the Bourne series.

Although the whole Greengrass shakey cam gets annoying.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 09:49 PM

56. The Man Who Knew Too Little nt

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Demo_Chris (Reply #56)

Tue Aug 20, 2013, 05:56 PM

73. +1, nt.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 10:00 PM

57. The Parallax View

 

Not sure if this fits but it sure is a good movie.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Parallax_View

-snip-

Frady recognizes a Parallax man from a photo that Austin Tucker showed him: the man was a waiter in the Space Needle restaurant the day Senator Carroll was murdered. He follows the man and watches him retrieve a bag from the trunk of a car, then drive to an airport and check it as baggage on a plane. Frady boards the plane himself. He notices a Senator aboard, but not the Parallax man. Frady writes a warning on a napkin and slips it into the drink service cart. The warning is found and the plane returns to Los Angeles. Everybody is evacuated moments before a bomb explodes on the plane.

Frady's generally skeptical editor Bill Rintels (Hume Cronyn) listens to a secretly recorded tape of a conversation Frady had with Jack Younger. A disguised Parallax operative delivers coffee and food to Rintels' office. Rintels is poisoned and the tape disappears.

Frady follows the Parallax assassins to the dress rehearsal for a political rally for Senator George Hammond (Jim Davis). Frady hides in the auditorium's rafters to secretly observe the Parallax men, who are posing as security personnel. Frady realizes too late he has been set up as a scapegoat, and Hammond is shot dead by an unseen gunman. As Frady is trying to escape, he is seen in the rafters and a Parallax agent kills Frady with a shotgun.

The same committee that determined a lone gunman killed Senator Carroll now reports that Frady, acting alone, killed Senator Hammond. The committee further expresses the hope that their verdict will end political assassination conspiracy theories. They do not take questions from the press.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to East Coast Pirate (Reply #57)


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 10:10 PM

58. 13 Rue Madeleine

This James Cagney film of 1947 is one of my favorite
World War II era spy movies. Others:

Ministry Of Fear (1944)
Saboteur (1942)
Foreign Correspondent (1940)
Copnfessions Of A Nazi Spy (1939)
The House On 92nd Street (1945)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 10:29 PM

59. Not exactly spy movies, but...

My favorite spy programs were Get Smart and its Saturday morning counterpart, Lancelot Link, Secret Chimp. Bernie Kopell played Siegfried from KAOS on Get Smart, and was also the voice of several of the evil chimps from CHUMP.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 11:09 PM

62. Hopscotch with Walter Matthau and Glenda Jackson

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Mon Aug 19, 2013, 11:28 PM

63. Burn After Reading, Red, 3 Days of the Condor

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Tue Aug 20, 2013, 10:07 AM

68. Morning kick for great a fab movie list.

:kick:

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Tue Aug 20, 2013, 10:10 AM

69. The Smiley series...

... with Alec Guiness.

Oh, and Reilly: Ace of Spies with Sam Neill.

Those were great!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)


Response to otohara (Original post)

Tue Aug 20, 2013, 10:06 PM

76. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

Man, that's a great spy movie. Lots of intrigue.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Tue Aug 20, 2013, 10:33 PM

79. Argo. Sneakers. Wag the Dog. (nt)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Tue Aug 20, 2013, 10:41 PM

81. Shining Through, The Black Book, Salt, The Long Kiss Goodnight,

The Manchurian Candidate, and Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Wed Aug 21, 2013, 05:05 PM

83. Another TV series...

MI-5 aka Spooks in Great Britain. You never knew if main characters were going to survive tight situations, as they were sometime killed off mid-season.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Wed Aug 21, 2013, 05:14 PM

84. The MacKintosh Man,

North by Northwest
The Spy who Came in from the Cold
All of the proper Connery Bond films
Hopscotch


I almost forgot The Ipcress Files which is my favorite of all with a score to die for.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Wed Aug 21, 2013, 08:13 PM

85. Kick...because it's End of August...and it's Time to Catch Up...before September.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to otohara (Original post)

Fri Aug 23, 2013, 07:42 PM

86. SPY Weekend on DU....Seriously...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread