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Mon Mar 4, 2013, 10:52 PM

It was 80 years ago today...

"A widow, who used to do housework and laundry but who was finally left without any work, fed herself and her fourteen-year-old son on garbage. Before she picked up the meat, she would always take off her glasses so that she would not be able to see the maggots; but it sometimes made the boy so sick to look at this offal and smell it that he could not bring himself to eat."

- Edmund Wilson, Hull House (1932)

This is the America that Franklin Roosevelt took the helm of 80 years ago today. After decades of increasing income disparity, the bottom had fallen out under Hoover's watch. Hoover worked mightily to right the ship by bailing out banks and business, but to his great surprise, his trickle-down efforts never worked. The job creators wouldn't create jobs.

FDR entered the White House determined to create a New Deal for Americans - a deal where all Americans, not just the wealthy, could get a leg up and lead a decent life. And since 1933, that New Deal has been the very lifeblood of working Americans: As the New Deal grew and expanded, the 99% did better. As the New Deal has been unceasingly attacked and beaten back by America's elite since 1981, the lot of the 99% has fallen, fallen.

It has become fashionable lately to bash FDR. Even Democrats have joined in the fun, including our President, who claims (erroneously) that FDR let the previous depression get terrible on purpose. And while FDR had his faults, the bottom line is this: he made sure that the working class got a fair break, and he set the stage for almost 50 years of growing prosperity for all Americans.

As we listen to the growing bipartisan demand to take bigger and bigger chunks out of the New Deal, to whittle it down until it's small enough to be drowned in a bathtub, remember this: we are the New Deal, and the New Deal is us. If it dies, we die with it.


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Arrow 76 replies Author Time Post
Reply It was 80 years ago today... (Original post)
MannyGoldstein Mar 2013 OP
Sekhmets Daughter Mar 2013 #1
TDale313 Mar 2013 #4
lark Mar 2013 #59
rhett o rick Mar 2013 #2
jsr Mar 2013 #9
2naSalit Mar 2013 #3
840high Mar 2013 #10
defacto7 Mar 2013 #5
Heather MC Mar 2013 #6
AnotherMcIntosh Mar 2013 #7
BuelahWitch Mar 2013 #16
Dragonfli Mar 2013 #31
HiPointDem Mar 2013 #48
AnotherMcIntosh Mar 2013 #53
Babel_17 Mar 2013 #57
Doctor_J Mar 2013 #66
jazzimov Mar 2013 #8
rhett o rick Mar 2013 #11
jazzimov Mar 2013 #13
BuelahWitch Mar 2013 #17
EOTE Mar 2013 #37
Sheepshank Mar 2013 #36
MannyGoldstein Mar 2013 #12
jazzimov Mar 2013 #14
MannyGoldstein Mar 2013 #15
jazzimov Mar 2013 #18
abelenkpe Mar 2013 #19
sabrina 1 Mar 2013 #28
AnotherMcIntosh Mar 2013 #32
WillyT Mar 2013 #34
jsr Mar 2013 #45
raouldukelives Mar 2013 #63
shcrane71 Mar 2013 #68
woo me with science Mar 2013 #71
EOTE Mar 2013 #40
AnotherMcIntosh Mar 2013 #54
HiPointDem Mar 2013 #50
pampango Mar 2013 #35
JoePhilly Mar 2013 #62
harkonen Mar 2013 #20
John2 Mar 2013 #21
midnight Mar 2013 #22
mountain grammy Mar 2013 #23
MannyGoldstein Mar 2013 #65
mountain grammy Mar 2013 #69
I Cant Dance Mar 2013 #24
MannyGoldstein Mar 2013 #29
annabanana Mar 2013 #38
CountAllVotes Mar 2013 #76
JDPriestly Mar 2013 #25
TDale313 Mar 2013 #26
Octafish Mar 2013 #41
woo me with science Mar 2013 #72
Hulk Smash Mar 2013 #27
MannyGoldstein Mar 2013 #30
ProSense Mar 2013 #33
Octafish Mar 2013 #39
ProSense Mar 2013 #42
Octafish Mar 2013 #43
ProSense Mar 2013 #44
Octafish Mar 2013 #46
ProSense Mar 2013 #47
Octafish Mar 2013 #51
ProSense Mar 2013 #52
Octafish Mar 2013 #55
ieoeja Mar 2013 #56
MannyGoldstein Mar 2013 #58
Doctor_J Mar 2013 #67
AnotherMcIntosh Mar 2013 #73
Ishoutandscream2 Mar 2013 #49
kentuck Mar 2013 #60
MannyGoldstein Mar 2013 #61
hay rick Mar 2013 #74
limpyhobbler Mar 2013 #64
woo me with science Mar 2013 #70
woo me with science Mar 2013 #75

Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)

Mon Mar 4, 2013, 10:55 PM

1. "...we are the New Deal, and the New deal is us. If it dies, we die with it."

It needs to said, over and over again until people everywhere, 'get it'

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Response to Sekhmets Daughter (Reply #1)

Mon Mar 4, 2013, 11:31 PM

4. + 1,000,000

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Response to Sekhmets Daughter (Reply #1)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 06:08 PM

59. Too bad that Obama doesn't care.

Since he's not running again, he's totally willing to do grave damage to the Democratic party for many years to come by whacking SSI. He's acting as Jeb Bush's best friend in doing all possible to make sure that R is the next president.

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)


Response to rhett o rick (Reply #2)

Mon Mar 4, 2013, 11:55 PM

9. Perfect and Sensible Logic

We all know four out of five dentists agree FDR was a lazy bum.

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)

Mon Mar 4, 2013, 11:08 PM

3. Absolutely

and as quoted and stated by Sekhmets Daughter above, over and over and over and over... on billboards and full page newspaper ads and all over the cell phone universe and everywhere else...

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Response to 2naSalit (Reply #3)

Mon Mar 4, 2013, 11:55 PM

10. Loud and clear -

over and over and over - sending this to my whole email list.

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)

Mon Mar 4, 2013, 11:38 PM

5. Here's to FDR!




Even with his few mistakes or the misgivings of others, FDR was still one of the greatest presidents we ever had. We need an FDR now, but the political climate and the powers that underlie it are not the same.

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)

Mon Mar 4, 2013, 11:48 PM

6. I am proud to say i own one of FDR new deal condos

Well it was built to be military housing in 1948, but it's mine now!

Correction i am Home buyer not a home owner

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)

Mon Mar 4, 2013, 11:52 PM

7. The statement re Obama peaked my curiosity:

 

"It has become fashionable lately to bash FDR. Even Democrats have joined in the fun, including our President, who claims that FDR let the previous depression get terrible on purpose."

The included link leads to this quote from Obama:

"We didn't actually, I think, do what Franklin Delano Roosevelt did, which was basically wait for six months until the thing had gotten so bad that it became an easier sell politically because we thought that was irresponsible. We had to act quickly." - President Obama

http://www.nextnewdeal.net/story-behind-obamas-remarks-fdr

Which leads to a HuffPo post:
To this point, just a week ago, on November 8, {2010} President Obama very mistakenly said that he and his administration "didn't do what Franklin Delano Roosevelt did, which was basically wait for six months until the thing had gotten so bad that it became an easier sell politically." The truth is that FDR took office on Saturday, March 4, 1933, called Congress into special session to meet five days later on March 9th, and by June 15th, at the end of the "Hundred Days", had seen almost all of the early New Deal financial legislation passed.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leo-hindery-jr/political-malpractice-in_b_784108.html

Amazing. With all the resources behind him, and with his long interest in becoming the President of the United States, President Obama actually has a belief that FDR waited
"for six months until the thing had gotten so bad that it became an easier sell politically."

Where does he get his information? From Fox News?

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Response to AnotherMcIntosh (Reply #7)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 12:18 AM

16. Thank you for clearing that up

I thought I remembered FDR going right to work on the New Deal after his inauguration. I hate it when people try to re-write history, whether it be a Republican or a Democrat.

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Response to AnotherMcIntosh (Reply #7)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 12:49 PM

31. I had no idea that he is so ignorant of 20th century American history

One wonders why there wasn't even an aid around that passed High School to clarify it for him, hell if I recall properly they even taught about FDR's first 100 days when I was in grammar school.

No wonder he has no understanding of Keynesian economics, he appears to have missed those high school years entirely.

I am now rather embarrassed for him.

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Response to AnotherMcIntosh (Reply #7)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 03:54 PM

48. It looks like this is an official new meme of the Council on Foreign Relations crowd, actually.

 

But as President Obama took office, the Council on Foreign Relations was cranking up a remarkably one-sided conference purporting to be a "Second Look at the Great Depression and the New Deal." Ms. Shlaes was a prominent participant, as was the Council's co-chair, one Robert Rubin, whose myriad protégés thronged the Obama Treasury and economic councils.

Whether our highly intellectual president picked up the idea by reading it or hearing somebody else say it, it was, and is, in the air. And you can be sure that his words will now be rattling around for years to come and likely cited as proof of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "irresponsibility."

http://www.nextnewdeal.net/story-behind-obamas-remarks-fdr


Hard to believe those big shots could have forgotten "The first 100 days". In fact, I don't believe they did; I believe they're purposefully revising history for their own reasons.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #48)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 04:18 PM

53. It makes a perfect cover for what the take-it-slow-I've-got-mine crowd has been doing.

 

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Response to AnotherMcIntosh (Reply #7)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 06:02 PM

57. Thanks for the added details!

We really need to on our toes and to stay on top of the media to do so as well.

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Response to AnotherMcIntosh (Reply #7)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 09:57 PM

66. Obama hates FDR, hates liberals, hates real Dems

His fan club all hate us too. He has also, through Carney, said that the New Deal is an anachronism that needs to be done away with.

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)

Mon Mar 4, 2013, 11:54 PM

8. Wait a minute - WTF?

It was a nice tribute, until you had to bash Obama.

Maybe it's just me, but it seems to me that you use every opportunity to bash Obama as some here used to bash Bush.

Is it just me that you are constantly bashing Obama for any reason?

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Response to jazzimov (Reply #8)

Mon Mar 4, 2013, 11:56 PM

11. "Is it just me that you are constantly bashing Obama for any reason?" Since you asked,

it's just you.

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Response to rhett o rick (Reply #11)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 12:07 AM

13. wierd, because

it seems that every post the OP does actually DOES bash Obama in one way or another.

Maybe you don't see it.

The "is it just me" part was a rhetorical question. Maybe you should look "rhetorical" up.

Just a suggestion!

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Response to jazzimov (Reply #13)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 12:20 AM

17. When President Obama decides to lie about historical fact

in order to make his own administration look better, he most certainly needs to be called on it.

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Response to jazzimov (Reply #13)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 02:58 PM

37. A rhetorical question is not one whose answer you don't want to hear.

In case that's what you thought it was. And considering that it's a question whose answer many here would disagree upon, you should perhaps label it to be rhetorical if that's what you intend it to be.

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Response to rhett o rick (Reply #11)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 02:56 PM

36. Seriously, after your previous post on this thread

you lack any credibility to judge anyone anytime. Too bad, 25,000+ posts all down the toilet, I'll never read another one. buh bye.

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Response to jazzimov (Reply #8)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 12:04 AM

12. If I've posted something that's not correct, please let me know

Thanks in advance.

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Reply #12)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 12:08 AM

14. Please look up the definition of "spin".

ty.

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Response to jazzimov (Reply #14)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 12:15 AM

15. Are you claiming that Obama never said that FDR purposely prolonged the Depression? nt

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Reply #15)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 12:26 AM

18. Framkly, Sir, I am claiming that after reading many of your posts

that I am of the opinion that you are a very self-centered individual. You have already decided what "should be done" in your own mind without consideration of any outside influences and climate.

Therefore, anyone who does not "do as you think proper" or who does not meet the fantasy of your desired "results" is therefore unfit - at least in your mind.

Honestly, I do not think that you have any type of logic and you rely on pushing people's emotional "buttons" in order to get a response.

I think that you will take any opportunity or twist the words of any candidate to justify your ends.

But, that is just my personal opinion. Which precludes me from taking anything you have to say "seriously".

Good night!

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Response to jazzimov (Reply #18)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 12:46 AM

19. lol!

It's like something out of a cartoon

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Response to jazzimov (Reply #18)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 04:09 AM

28. Manny asked you a question. You did not answer, so let me help. President Obama

bashed FDR by incorrectly stating that FDR 'waited six months' before he decided to do something to help people when took office. That was incorrect.

'Bashing' means attacking someone for something they did not do. If you can find something in Manny's posts that refer to the President that is deliberately incorrect and intended to create a false impression, then post them. Otherwise you have incorrectly used the word 'bashing'. The word you should have used is 'criticized' which it is the duty of citizens to do regarding elected officials, so long as they are accurate in their criticism.

This President is a Democrat. We give him the respect we do not give Republican president, which is we expect him to act like a Democrat. That includes not bashing one of the best Democratic presidents on Social Issues in the last century. And not even considering dismantling the Social Network that is the cornerstone of the Democratic Party, not even a teeny, weeny bit to satisfy Republicans. And when he does suggest doing such a thing, which he has, it is not just Manny who will criticize him, it is ALL Democrats.

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Response to sabrina 1 (Reply #28)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 01:22 PM

32. Well said. Thank you for saying it so clearly and forcefully.

 

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Response to sabrina 1 (Reply #28)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 02:32 PM

34. + 1,000,000,000 !!! - Bravo !!! - K & R !!!






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Response to sabrina 1 (Reply #28)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 03:32 PM

45. No truer words

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Response to sabrina 1 (Reply #28)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 07:29 PM

63. +1 for the truth.

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Response to sabrina 1 (Reply #28)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 10:02 PM

68. Well said!

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Response to sabrina 1 (Reply #28)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 10:23 PM

71. Thank you,

for that well deserved smackdown of a shameless post.

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Response to jazzimov (Reply #18)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 03:01 PM

40. First, you can stop pretending to be The Magistrate.

Second, your attitude is pretty damned poor and your logic is even worse. So, that would preclude a great bulk of us here from taking anything you have to say "seriously". If you have an issue with the SUBSTANCE of a particular post, you can address that substance. You are utterly incapable of doing that, so you shoot the messenger. Shooting the messenger is for the intellectually lazy.

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Response to EOTE (Reply #40)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 04:22 PM

54. x2. Yes, in particular, he does seem to be channeling The Magistrate's style.

 

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Response to jazzimov (Reply #14)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 03:58 PM

50. 'spin' is when the CFR & the president put out memes about how FDR took 6 months to do anything

 

about the depression.


"Americans of all political persuasions were demanding immediate action, and Roosevelt responded with a remarkable series of new programs in the “first hundred days” of the administration, in which he met with Congress for 100 days. During those 100 days of lawmaking, Congress granted every request Roosevelt asked, and passed a few programs (such as the FDIC to insure bank accounts) that he opposed. Ever since, presidents have been judged against FDR for what they accomplished in their first 100 days. Walter Lippmann famously noted:

At the end of February we were a congeries of disorderly panic-stricken mobs and factions. In the hundred days from March to June we became again an organized nation confident of our power to provide for our own security and to control our own destiny.

The economy had hit bottom in March 1933 and then started to expand. Economic indicators show the economy reached nadir in the first days of March, then began a steady, sharp upward recovery. Thus the Federal Reserve Index of Industrial Production sank to its lowest point of 52.8 in July 1932 (with 1935–39 = 100) and was practically unchanged at 54.3 in March 1933; however by July 1933, it reached 85.5, a dramatic rebound of 57% in four months. Recovery was steady and strong until 1937. Except for employment, the economy by 1937 surpassed the levels of the late 1920s. The Recession of 1937 was a temporary downturn. Private sector employment, especially in manufacturing, recovered to the level of the 1920s but failed to advance further until the war. Chart 2 shows the growth in employment without adjusting for population growth. The U.S. population was 124,840,471 in 1932 and 128,824,829 in 1937, an increase of 3,984,468. The ratio of these numbers, times the number of jobs in 1932, means there was a need for 938,000 more 1937 jobs to maintain the same employment level.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Deal

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Response to jazzimov (Reply #8)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 02:51 PM

35. It was a nice and worthy tribute to a great man. The Obama bash seemed gratuitious

but not surprising.

Although perhaps the Obama-bash was the real point of the OP and the praise for FDR was just the setup for that. You never know. And it's not just you.

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Response to jazzimov (Reply #8)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 07:08 PM

62. It's not you.

The OP is the leading producer of manufactured outrage widgets here on DU.

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 12:58 AM

20. Obama is no FDR

 

and never will be. Deal with it.

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 01:04 AM

21. President Obama is the least of our worries.

 

Six months or one month is irrelevant. What matters is he do the right thing and the end result. He cannot do anything without the Democratic Party or us. That is the big mistake the Republicans are making. They forget that we are constituents also just like their constituents. That is why they loss the Election. They also insult our intelligence. They actually believe we voted for President Obama because of the color of his skin. Well I got news for them. We actually have the capacity to think for ourselves.

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 01:19 AM

22. One of the breaks the working class received was a job.... Let's get Americans working...

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 01:19 AM

23. I worry that my generation may be the last to truly appreciate the New Deal, or even Civil Rights

Certainly the labor movement doesn't seem to resonate with younger folks. They know they're being screwed by employers, but they don't seem to see unions as the answer.
When I was young, my family stressed over what to do with Grandma and Grandpa, who couldn't pay for their doctors and pay the rent too. Medicare to the rescue. Two generations later and Grandma and Grandpa are better off than their kids, but the kids don't seem to understand why. It's Medicare, dummy! It's Social Security, dummy! It's Civil Rights, dummy! It's the ERA... oops, didn't get that one, and we've been slowed down ever since.
I remember, watching history being made almost every day in the 60's, and we had a news industry just dying to tell us all about it on the teevee. Now, we get crap.
I'm 65 and can't understand why anyone my age (whose not Rmoney) could be anything but a liberal, FDR loving, Democrat, and why we haven't instilled that in the younger generations.

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Response to mountain grammy (Reply #23)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 08:54 PM

65. I hope that you're wrong!

But it's certainly true that most people today don't appreciate what we have, how we got here, and where we're going.

It should be taught, the same as we teach the Revolution and the Civil War. It's a big deal!

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Reply #65)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 10:19 PM

69. I hope I'm wrong too, I sure don't want to be right, but the schools aren't teaching it.

I can tell you what my three kids didn't learn in school, we made sure they learned from us and from the books we gave them to read. The first place we visited in Colorado was Ludlow. I believe in public schools, but as parents we have to do our jobs too.

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 02:26 AM

24. Let me warn you

 

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Response to I Cant Dance (Reply #24)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 09:15 AM

29. Nothing changes, does it?

Great video.

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Response to I Cant Dance (Reply #24)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 02:59 PM

38. Boy Howdy THAT'S A KEEPER! . . . .n/t

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Response to I Cant Dance (Reply #24)

Wed Mar 6, 2013, 11:03 AM

76. +1,000

n/t

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 03:56 AM

25. So, so, so glad you are on DU, Manny Goldstein.

A voice of reason. Thanks.

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Response to JDPriestly (Reply #25)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 04:01 AM

26. +1

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Response to JDPriestly (Reply #25)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 03:01 PM

41. +2

More Manny, for democratic discussion.

More FDR, for democratic progress.

Less phonies, for a saner polity.

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Response to JDPriestly (Reply #25)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 10:23 PM

72. Hear, hear! nt

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 04:08 AM

27. What he did to the Japanese Americans is unforgivable.

 

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Response to Hulk Smash (Reply #27)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 09:21 AM

30. It was wrong.

Not to excuse it, but in the context of a world war, it's somewhat more forgivable to me. Millions of people were being slaughtered each month - things may have gotten confusing.

And somehow we won that war without torture as a policy.

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Reply #30)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 01:29 PM

33. "Not to excuse it, but in the context of a world war, it's somewhat more forgivable to me."

So glad that denying people's civil rights is "forgivable."

Here's your excuse for the Dresden bombing: http://sync.democraticunderground.com/?com=view_post&forum=1002&pid=2348318

"And somehow we won that war without torture as a policy."

Are you suggesting that President Obama has a "torture" policy?

Japanese American internment

President Franklin D. Roosevelt authorized the internment with Executive Order 9066, issued February 19, 1942, which allowed local military commanders to designate "military areas" as "exclusion zones," from which "any or all persons may be excluded." This power was used to declare that all people of Japanese ancestry were excluded from the entire Pacific coast, including all of California and much of Oregon, Washington and Arizona, except for those in internment camps. In 1944, the Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the exclusion orders, while noting that the provisions that singled out people of Japanese ancestry were a separate issue outside the scope of the proceedings. The United States Census Bureau assisted the internment efforts by providing confidential neighborhood information on Japanese Americans. The Bureau's role was denied for decades, but was finally proven in 2007.

In 1980, President Jimmy Carter conducted an investigation to determine whether putting Japanese Americans into internment camps was justified well enough by the government. He appointed the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians to investigate the camps. The commission's report, named “Personal Justice Denied,” found little evidence of Japanese disloyalty at the time and recommended the government pay reparations to the survivors. They formed a payment of $20,000 to each individual internment camp survivor. These were the reparations passed by President Ronald Reagan.

In 1988, Congress passed and President Ronald Reagan signed legislation which apologized for the internment on behalf of the U.S. government. The legislation said that government actions were based on "race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership". The U.S. government eventually disbursed more than $1.6 billion in reparations to Japanese Americans who had been interned and their heirs.

<...>

Many internees lost irreplaceable personal property due to the restrictions on what could be taken into the camps. These losses were compounded by theft and destruction of items placed in governmental storage. A number of persons died or suffered for lack of medical care, and several were killed by sentries; James Wakasa, for instance, was killed at Topaz War Relocation Center, near the perimeter wire. Nikkei were prohibited from leaving the Military Zones during the last few weeks before internment, and only able to leave the camps by permission of the camp administrators.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_American_internment

We Japanese Americans must not forget our wartime internment

The degrading treatment of Japanese American families like mine is the theme of my new musical, Allegiance

Seventy years ago, US soldiers bearing bayoneted rifles came marching up to the front door of our family's home in Los Angeles, ordering us out. Our crime was looking like the people who had bombed Pearl Harbor a few months before. I'll never forget that day, nor the tears streaming down my mother's face as we were forcibly removed, herded off like animals, to a nearby race track. There, for weeks, we would live in a filthy horse stable while our "permanent" relocation camp was being constructed thousands of miles away in Arkansas, in a place called Rohwer.

I recently revisited Rohwer. Gone were the sentry towers, armed guards, barbed wire and crudely constructed barracks that defined our lives for many years. The swamp had been drained, the trees chopped down. Only miles and miles of cotton fields. The only thing remaining was the cemetery with two tall monuments.

Because I was a child, I didn't understand the depth of the degradation and deprivation my parents suffered, or how courageous and foresighted my mother had been to smuggle a sewing machine into camp, which permitted her to make modest curtains for our bare quarters. I didn't grasp what a blow the ordeal was to my father's role as provider, as he struggled to keep our family together. The family ate, bathed and did chores along with a whole community, pressed together in the confines of a makeshift camp, in the oppressive heat and mosquito-infested swamps of Arkansas.

Later my family would be shipped to a high-security camp in Tule Lake, California, constructed in a desolate, dry lake bed in the north of the state. Three layers of barbed-wire fences now confined us. Out of principle, my parents had refused to answer yes to a "loyalty" questionnaire the government had promulgated. It had asked whether they would serve in the US army and go wherever ordered, and whether they would swear allegiance to the US government and "forswear" loyalty to the Japanese emperor – as if any had ever sworn such loyalty in the first instance.

- more -

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/apr/27/we-japanese-americans-wartime-internment

WWII had brutal consequences on U.S. soil.

During World War II, six German saboteurs who secretly entered the United States on a mission to attack its civil infrastructure are executed by the United States for spying. Two other saboteurs who disclosed the plot to the FBI and aided U.S. authorities in their manhunt for their collaborators were imprisoned.

<...>

Burger and the rest of the Long Island team were picked up by June 22, and by June 27 the whole of the Florida team was arrested. To preserve wartime secrecy, President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered a special military tribunal consisting of seven generals to try the saboteurs. At the end of July, Dasch was sentenced to 30 years in prison, Burger was sentenced to hard labor for life, and the other six Germans were sentenced to die. The six condemned saboteurs were executed by electric chair in Washington, D.C., on August 8. In 1944, two other German spies were caught after a landing in Maine. No other instances of German sabotage within wartime America has come to light.

- more -

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/german-saboteurs-executed-in-washington


"It has become fashionable lately to bash FDR. Even Democrats have joined in the fun, including our President, who claims that FDR let the previous depression get terrible on purpose. And while FDR had his faults, the bottom line is this: he made sure that the working class got a fair break, and he set the stage for almost 50 years of growing prosperity for all Americans. "

It almost seems like you're harboring some deep animosity of President Obama.

Ever get the feeling that virtually nobody with power gives a crap about your life?
http://www.democraticunderground.com/10022438850

We need a new Democratic Party
http://www.democraticunderground.com/10022453600

Here's some perspective:

FYI: America's problems predate 2009, and President Obama is working to improve the country.
http://www.democraticunderground.com/10022461547

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Response to ProSense (Reply #33)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 02:59 PM

39. Monitor much?

Can't someone have a POV without being made into an object of, oh, I don't know, contempt?

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Response to Octafish (Reply #39)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 03:08 PM

42. Are you

"Can't someone have a POV without being made into an object of, oh, I don't know, contempt?"

...upset about the hypocrisy?

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Response to ProSense (Reply #42)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 03:16 PM

43. Yes.

Aren't you?

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Response to Octafish (Reply #43)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 03:19 PM

44. Yes, which was the point of my comment.

Yet you seem offended that someone would point it out.

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Response to ProSense (Reply #44)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 03:34 PM

46. I don't seem anything. I don't like you monitoring another DUer.

It creates an impression that what Manny is writing about deserves less respect than say someone who disagrees with him or her. Once one person can be derided, it leads to marginalization. That is most un-democratic.

All Manny Goldstein's about is being a democrat: One who believes that all people are equal under the law and the powers of government should be used to make life better for all. Like Manny, I wish the leadership of the Democratic Party would remember that, whether through a New New Deal or verified paper trails at the ballot box.

Something else we have noticed: the banks and corporations aren't in that equation, yet they are central to the problem in Washington and in the Democratic Party.

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Response to Octafish (Reply #46)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 03:45 PM

47. I really don't care

"I don't seem anything. I don't like you monitoring another DUer.

It creates an impression that what Manny is writing about deserves less respect than say someone who disagrees with him or her. Once one person can be derided, it leads to marginalization. That is most un-democratic. "

... for your spin. I mean, please go police someone else, and take your own advice. I responded to his comment, which apparently is eating away at you.



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Response to ProSense (Reply #47)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 03:58 PM

51. No, it isn't 'eating away' at me.

What does bother me is the hypocrisy.

An example: FDR was less than perfect because of the un-Constitutional internment of Japanese Americans during the war.

Thus, FDR is a flawed model for Obama to follow, making it good Democratic policy to support his Wall Street-first economic policy.

Hypocrisy: That's trickle-down, when the GOP does it.


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Response to Octafish (Reply #51)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 04:06 PM

52. What utter

"An example: FDR was less than perfect because of the un-Constitutional internment of Japanese Americans during the war.

Thus, FDR is a flawed model for Obama to follow, making it good Democratic policy to support his Wall Street-first economic policy."

...nonsense.

The Wall Street reform law would have a significant impact if implementation is sped up.
http://www.democraticunderground.com/10022441546

Report: Wall Street’s Opposition to Dodd-Frank Reforms Echoes Its Resistance to New Deal Financial Safeguards

Bedrock Consumer Protections Once Were Flogged as ‘Exceedingly Dangerous,’ ‘Monstrous Systems’ That Would ‘Cripple’ the Economy

WASHINGTON, D.C. – As the nation approaches the first anniversary of the Dodd-Frank financial reform law, opponents are claiming that the new measure is extraordinarily damaging, especially to Main Street. But industry’s alarmist rhetoric bears striking resemblance to the last time it faced sweeping new safeguards: during the New Deal reforms. The parallels between the language used both then and now are detailed in a report released today by Public Citizen and the Cry Wolf Project.

In the decades since the Great Depression, Americans acknowledged the necessity of having safeguards in place to prevent another crash of the financial markets, including the creation of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), and laws requiring public companies to accurately disclose their financial affairs. Although these are now seen as bedrock protections when they were first introduced, Wall Street cried foul, the new report, “Industry Repeats Itself: The Financial Reform Fight,” found.

“The business community’s wildly inaccurate forecasts about the New Deal reforms devalue the credibility of the ominous predictions they are making today,” said Taylor Lincoln, research director of Public Citizen’s Congress Watch division and author of the report. “If history comes close to repeating itself, industry is going to look very silly for its hand-wringing over Dodd-Frank when people look back.”


<...>

In fact, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act is designed to prevent another Wall Street crash, which really made it tough on everyone by causing massive job loss and severely hurting corner butchers and bakers, as well as retirees, families with mortgages and others. The Dodd-Frank law increases transparency (particularly in derivatives markets); creates a new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to ensure that consumers receive straightforward information about financial products and to police abusive practices; improves corporate governance; increases capital requirements for banks; deters particularly large financial institutions from providing incentives for employees to take undue risks; and gives the government the ability to take failed investment institutions into receivership, similar to the FDIC’s authority regarding commercial banks. Much of it has yet to be implemented.

- more -

http://www.commondreams.org/newswire/2011/07/12-0


Does Dodd-Frank really end ‘too big to fail’?

Posted by Mike Konczal

<...>

Dodd-Frank tries to deal with these issues by creating the rules for a crisis in advance. It requires stricter regulations on capital and activities for the largest and riskiest financial firms, to make them less likely to fail in a crisis. Dodd-Frank also grants the FDIC a special new power called resolution authority. This allows the government to run a bridge company to keep essential operations running at a failed firm that needs to be liquidated, with losses put on those who deserve them, rather than putting taxpayers at risk.

So what do critics have to say? The first objection is that all of this is unnecessary – there’s no such thing as systemic risk. Bank runs usually don’t happen, but when they do they are necessary, and they don’t threaten the surrounding financial system. This laissez-faire approach doesn’t carry much weight among scholars.

The second criticism — he one Hensarling is making — is that resolution authority is a permanent, unfair bailout. Some argue that the FDIC will use their powers to bailout creditors instead of imposing losses on them. Others worry that the FDIC’s ability to borrow money and provide bridge money is an unfair practice that puts taxpayers at risk of losses. The underlying concern is that stakeholders in the financial firm won’t care if they go through resolution authority, and as such, resolution authority makes them a safer bet and acts as a kind of permanent bailout promise to the markets.

However, the structure of Dodd-Frank’s resolution authority is explicitly designed to avoid bailouts. Numerous regulators must approve the activation of this process, and they have to argue that either the bankruptcy code or “a private sector alternative to prevent the default” aren’t available or appropriate instead...if a firm goes into resolution the FDIC has to wipe out shareholders and hit creditors in a way designed to mimic bankruptcy. It is blocked from buying equity in the firm, like in TARP or AIG, and can’t act for “the purpose of preserving the covered financial company.” It also has to fire management, board members, and has the option to claw back previous compensation. It’s difficult to imagine a firm wanting to go through this process. If any taxpayer money is put on the line, it has to be recouped from the financial sector as a whole; this is appropriate, because the government is acting to preserve the financial sector as a whole.

- more -

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/03/02/does-dodd-frank-really-end-too-big-to-fail/

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Response to ProSense (Reply #52)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 04:24 PM

55. Obama Commits Unilateral Disarmament as a Debt Ceiling Negotiator

William K. Black
Assoc. Professor, Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City; Sr. regulator during S&L debacle

President Obama is getting ready to negotiate (or, if you believe him, not negotiate) an extension of the debt limit. The Republicans control the House and are promising to follow Donald Trump's suggestion that they use what he called the "nuclear weapon" to terrorize the U.S. economy and people in order to gain negotiating leverage over Obama. That act of treachery was designed to produce two other acts of betrayal of the American people. First, Trump urged the Republicans to use their "nuclear weapon" to force Obama to inflict austerity on our Nation and force us back into recession. Second, Trump urged the Republicans to use their leverage to force Obama to gut the safety net. It is somehow fitting that Trump's advice to act in unprincipled manner was designed to produce policies that would enrich the wealthy and cause immense harm to the nation.

Naturally, the Republican Party has decided to adopt Trump's "nuclear weapon" strategy in its entirety. A party that takes its policy advice from Donald Trump -- advice to use a "nuclear weapon" on our economy in order to extort policy changes that will enrich the 1 percent at the expense of the nation -- has become a self-parody and the enemy of the American people.

I wrote to warn about how to disarm Trump's treacherous threat to use a nuclear weapon against America.

Like many readers, I have been a negotiator in important matters. This was one of my functions as litigation director of a federal agency. In my column, I showed multiple ways in which Obama could eliminate permanently the ability of any party to use the debt limit as a means of terror and extortion against America. We can defuse Trump's "nuclear weapon."

Obama, however, has systematically thrown away the means to defuse the weapon. He has unilaterally disarmed as he prepares to confront Speaker Boehner. He has unilaterally refused to do his duty under the 14th amendment and he has unilaterally refused to use the platinum-clad coin to defuse Trump's nuclear weapon. Indeed, he has ginned up and put in the public record the absurd legal position that Treasury has no authority to issue such a platinum-clad coin and made the even more preposterous claim that the Federal Reserve would violate instructions from the Treasury to accept such a coin. If Obama had wanted to use the platinum-clad coin or the 14th amendment, the Treasury opinion would have been said the opposite, and the opinion could have been written without torturing the language of the statute. By torturing the language of the statute to create a negative legal opinion, Obama has cast doubt on the legal ability of future presidents who would have the courage to defuse Trump's nuclear weapon to do so. Obama's actions either indicate that he does not know how to negotiate or wishes to be "forced" by the Republicans to make deep cuts to social programs and begin to unravel the safety net.

CONTINUED...

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/william-k-black/obama-debt-ceiling_b_2478191.html

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Reply #30)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 05:32 PM

56. What bothers me about the Japanese interrment complaint, is that they tried *not* to inter so many.


The FBI was tasked with the job of finding suspects among the Japanese. Problem is, the FBI did not have much expertise where Japanese language and culture was concerned. Italian and German they had a handle on. So a very small percentage of Italians and Germans were sent to the camps. Not understanding the Japanese, the FBI defaulted on the side of caution.

As a result the Japanese ended up treated better in the camps than did the Italians and Germans. And post-war the Japanese were released pretty quickly. While it took years to sort out the Italians and Germans.

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Response to ieoeja (Reply #56)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 06:04 PM

58. That's really interesting.

I hadn't heard about that, thanks.

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Response to Hulk Smash (Reply #27)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 10:01 PM

67. Here comes a 30-poster to hijack the thread

the KoolAid drinkers will be along to help you soon

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Response to Doctor_J (Reply #67)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 11:56 PM

73. x2

 

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 03:55 PM

49. K and R for the greatest president in the last century

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 06:28 PM

60. Sgt Pepper taught the band to play...

was my first thought from your title.

Yes, government is shrinking. We no longer have the tax base to pay for it.

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Response to kentuck (Reply #60)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 06:31 PM

61. This is weird. I'm just listening to Sgt. Pepper now.

I guess the title did it to both of us!

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Response to kentuck (Reply #60)

Wed Mar 6, 2013, 12:47 AM

74. We have the tax base.

A major problem is that a disproportionate share of taxable income is going to the very, very rich- and they have successfully avoided paying additional taxes in proportion to their increased incomes.

Social Security as an example- link: http://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/policybriefs/pb2011-02.html
"The percentage of earnings covered by the tax max has fallen since the early 1980s because earnings among above-max earners have grown faster than earnings among the rest of the working population."





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Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 07:59 PM

64. Great post. The New Deal transformed America. It's our heritage and we can all be proud of it.

Democrats should be working to defend and expand the New Deal programs.

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Original post)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 10:22 PM

70. HUGE K&R,

as always.

Thank you, Manny.

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