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Sat Feb 23, 2013, 11:32 PM

Today Is Bradley Manning's 1,000th Day Without a Trial

Saturday, February 23, marks Bradley Manning's 1,000th day in prison without a trial. In 2010, he was arrested for allegedly passing a trove of diplomatic cables and military reports to WikiLeaks, a nonprofit sunshine organization that publishes state secrets. Manning has been charged with everything from bringing discredit upon the armed forces to "aiding the enemy." Much of his first year of confinement was spent in humiliating suicide watch and Prevention of Injury conditions.

The actions of Bradley Manning offer a moment to reflect on the meaning of secrecy in the information age. Regardless of one's opinion of the young private (traitor or hero, disturbed or determined, ideological or idiotic), he put the entire secrecy apparatus to the test. Manning downloaded a perfect geologic slice of what we don't know, and presented that information to the world. He took the catastrophic loss of "secret" information out of the theoretical and into the real world. He initiated the government secrecy industry's worst-case scenario.

What is perhaps most astonishing is that the U.S. government had no substantive contingency plans or response mechanisms in place for such an event, aside from a shameful mistreatment of a harmless, if unwell, twenty-three year old. And though Manning's actions have proven to be a black swan event, when one considers that 2.4 million people have access to sensitive material, coupled with the decisive societal shift away from privacy and toward openness and "oversharing," it's astonishing that we're not seeing Manning-like incidents every day. Bradley Manning is also the true -- and admirable -- ideological case. He wasn't cashing in. He wasn't attempting to overthrow the Republic. He wasn't blackmailed. He had no firsthand knowledge of torture. He wasn't an agent for foreign intelligence. Instead, he released the information for the cause of openness itself.

It seems clear that what everyone expected to find in the diplomatic cables were unspeakable horrors committed by the tentacles of the U.S. government. It is therefore interesting that instead, most of what came to light was fairly laudable -- a State Department that actually tries to do what it says it will do. Insofar as there were surprises, they typically came in the form missing puzzle pieces and instances of "I knew it!" A clear-eyed reading of much of the classified material suggests a more accountable government than WikiLeaks's Julian Assange -- or anyone, really -- ever imagined.

http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2013/02/today-is-bradley-mannings-1-000th-day-without-a-trial/273430/

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Arrow 14 replies Author Time Post
Reply Today Is Bradley Manning's 1,000th Day Without a Trial (Original post)
morningfog Feb 2013 OP
hrmjustin Feb 2013 #1
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #2
struggle4progress Feb 2013 #9
KoKo Feb 2013 #11
struggle4progress Feb 2013 #14
1983law Feb 2013 #4
WillyT Feb 2013 #3
struggle4progress Feb 2013 #5
Player_One Feb 2013 #7
woo me with science Feb 2013 #6
msanthrope Feb 2013 #8
KoKo Feb 2013 #10
treestar Feb 2013 #12
Octafish Feb 2013 #13

Response to morningfog (Original post)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 11:34 PM

1. So much for a speedy trial.

I pray for him all the time.

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Response to hrmjustin (Reply #1)

Sun Feb 24, 2013, 01:27 AM

2. seems not too many give a damn - nearly 3 years of detention without trial

 

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #2)

Sun Feb 24, 2013, 06:51 PM

9. Manning's counsel requested a 706 hearing, shortly after Manning's arrest, in hopes of

developing evidence that Manning was not fit to stand trial (perhaps on counsel's hypothesis that Manning's behavior resulted from "gender dysphoria"). That single request accounts for at least of quarter of the delay, and it wasn't the only dilatory request. Counsel's broad discovery requests from large agencies for documents, not immediately relevant to the alleged crime, but potentially relevant to sentencing in the case of a guilty verdict or plea, have produced further substantial delays, due to the search effort required and to the classification issues that must be resolved. In addition, counsel has filed frivolous motions that can only delay the trial further, such as the demand that Lt. Col. Paul Almanza should recuse himself from the case on the grounds that he works with the Justice Department

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Response to struggle4progress (Reply #9)

Sun Feb 24, 2013, 07:07 PM

11. "frivilous motions..HUH?" So they are working against their client?

You go on to say "...In addition, counsel has filed frivolous motions that can only delay the trial further, such as the demand that Lt. Col. Paul Almanza should recuse himself from the case on the grounds that he works with the Justice Department.

Did you ever stop to think that Manning's Lawyers are working day and night to protect him from the US GOVERNMENT? You think they should be "slackers" and not bring in every bit of evidence they can discover as the FULL WEIGHT OF USA comes down on them and forces them to counter? It takes time for personal lawyers to "do DISCOVERY" against the US GOVT. who has the BEST AND BRIGHTEST at their Disposal on our Tax Payer Dollars.

You never can give Manning's defense a break. Why is that...and why do always think that he is wrong...along with Assange? Why not wait to see the Evidence Discovered and also realize the differences between the "average person" and the full weight of the US Govt. on them.

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Response to KoKo (Reply #11)

Sun Feb 24, 2013, 07:46 PM

14. To date, Coombs' filings have suggested that Manning's acts resulted from mental problems, that the

military was aware of Manning's mental problems and hence was negligent in allowing Manning access to sensitive data, that Manning's acts caused no real harm, and that Manning was amenable to a plea bargain that would result in a twenty year sentence in order to simplify the court martial on the other remaining charges

These facts do not lead towards a conclusion that Manning is a poor innocent being railroaded by vindictive government forces but rather seem to indicate that the government has good evidence against Manning and that a conviction on serious charges is likely, so that that Manning's position is very dicey indeed

I expect Coombs is a competent advocate and is indeed doing his best for his client in a difficult case. Deliberately slowing the proceedings to a snail's pace and then complaining of the slowness of everything, in the hopes that somebody will make a serious mistake, may indeed be the only hope Coombs has for obtaining the best possible outcome for Manning under the circumstances, but (frankly) I'm never filled with admiration at such performances

YMMV, I suppose

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Response to hrmjustin (Reply #1)

Sun Feb 24, 2013, 02:50 AM

4. There really is much behind these delays

 

I wouldn't place all the blame on the govt. Just sayin, and not taking any position.

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Response to morningfog (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2013, 02:09 AM

3. K & R !!!


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Response to morningfog (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2013, 10:36 AM

5. The delays largely result from defense motions, including defense requests for delay

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Response to struggle4progress (Reply #5)

Sun Feb 24, 2013, 10:44 AM

7. Agreed...

 

They came from both sides... Each looking for a weakness...

http://www.courthousenews.com/2012/11/09/52140.htm

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Response to morningfog (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2013, 10:41 AM

6. K&R

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Response to morningfog (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2013, 10:50 AM

8. The defense strategy is to delay trial, for very good reason.

It's pretty simple--Manning was moved to medium-security detention in Leavenworth after Quantico.

After conviction, he moves across the street to max security.

Every single day he spends in pre-trial med sec is a day he DOESN'T spend in max sec.

So, his defense attorney has been very smart--constantly delaying trial by filing pre-trial motions in clusters, usually in the month or two before the scheduled trial date. This then mandates another delay of trial, which is to Manning's benefit.

I think it's a good strategy, and at this point, the government hasn't offered them a deal they like. So staying in med sec is the best for all involved.

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Response to morningfog (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2013, 06:58 PM

10. Recommend

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Response to morningfog (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2013, 07:08 PM

12. Defendants have the right to ask for delay

To be prepared. As other posts in this thread show, the defense asked for delays in motions, etc. Very unfair to blame it all on the government as if they are doing it all themselves on purpose. If the rules are not followed, then quote which rules they are.

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Response to morningfog (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2013, 07:33 PM

13. His crime? Telling the truth about the national security state's crimes.

While exposing government criminality always wasn't a crime, the guy is lucky he didn't get a drone sent up his way.

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