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Fri Feb 22, 2013, 04:59 PM

DU darlings! Welcome to your Friday Afternoon Challenge. Today: “Hey, what’s Going On?”

These works have something going on, either in the picture itself or a circumstance involving the work. Your challenge is to figure that out! Hmm....

And without cheating, please...

1.


2.


3.


4.


5.


6.

108 replies, 8047 views

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Reply DU darlings! Welcome to your Friday Afternoon Challenge. Today: “Hey, what’s Going On?” (Original post)
CTyankee Feb 2013 OP
joeybee12 Feb 2013 #1
CTyankee Feb 2013 #3
joeybee12 Feb 2013 #5
CTyankee Feb 2013 #7
joeybee12 Feb 2013 #11
CTyankee Feb 2013 #13
Rhiannon12866 Feb 2013 #76
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #78
Rhiannon12866 Feb 2013 #79
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #80
Rhiannon12866 Feb 2013 #84
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #86
Rhiannon12866 Feb 2013 #93
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #102
Rhiannon12866 Feb 2013 #106
longship Feb 2013 #2
seabeyond Feb 2013 #10
Angry Dragon Feb 2013 #4
CTyankee Feb 2013 #6
seabeyond Feb 2013 #9
seabeyond Feb 2013 #8
CTyankee Feb 2013 #15
seabeyond Feb 2013 #16
CTyankee Feb 2013 #17
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #12
CTyankee Feb 2013 #14
countryjake Feb 2013 #81
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #82
countryjake Feb 2013 #87
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #88
countryjake Feb 2013 #90
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #91
countryjake Feb 2013 #95
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #97
countryjake Feb 2013 #99
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #103
CTyankee Feb 2013 #96
Call Me Wesley Feb 2013 #18
CTyankee Feb 2013 #19
Call Me Wesley Feb 2013 #26
CTyankee Feb 2013 #48
annabanana Feb 2013 #20
CTyankee Feb 2013 #23
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #45
DevonRex Feb 2013 #60
surrealAmerican Feb 2013 #21
Call Me Wesley Feb 2013 #22
CTyankee Feb 2013 #24
Call Me Wesley Feb 2013 #28
CTyankee Feb 2013 #58
X_Digger Feb 2013 #29
Call Me Wesley Feb 2013 #32
Go Vols Feb 2013 #25
CTyankee Feb 2013 #27
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #30
CTyankee Feb 2013 #36
countryjake Feb 2013 #83
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #85
countryjake Feb 2013 #92
Warpy Feb 2013 #31
X_Digger Feb 2013 #33
CTyankee Feb 2013 #37
countryjake Feb 2013 #44
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #46
CTyankee Feb 2013 #49
countryjake Feb 2013 #52
CTyankee Feb 2013 #54
countryjake Feb 2013 #61
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #47
countryjake Feb 2013 #50
jberryhill Feb 2013 #34
CTyankee Feb 2013 #38
Call Me Wesley Feb 2013 #39
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #89
Shrike47 Feb 2013 #35
CTyankee Feb 2013 #40
Call Me Wesley Feb 2013 #42
CTyankee Feb 2013 #59
CTyankee Feb 2013 #51
grantcart Feb 2013 #41
lapislzi Feb 2013 #43
CTyankee Feb 2013 #53
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #55
CTyankee Feb 2013 #56
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #62
CTyankee Feb 2013 #70
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #73
CTyankee Feb 2013 #94
CTyankee Feb 2013 #57
countryjake Feb 2013 #63
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #64
countryjake Feb 2013 #65
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #67
countryjake Feb 2013 #69
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #74
countryjake Feb 2013 #77
CTyankee Feb 2013 #98
countryjake Feb 2013 #107
CTyankee Feb 2013 #108
CTyankee Feb 2013 #71
countryjake Feb 2013 #72
CTyankee Feb 2013 #100
entanglement Feb 2013 #66
entanglement Feb 2013 #68
Manifestor_of_Light Feb 2013 #75
CTyankee Feb 2013 #101
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #104
CTyankee Feb 2013 #105

Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:04 PM

1. I think one is The Pieta, not THE Pieta,

but one of them, and it could even be one of Michelangelo's version, but, again, not the really famous one in St Peter's

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Response to joeybee12 (Reply #1)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:08 PM

3. Research!

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #3)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:13 PM

5. That confused me! nt

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Response to joeybee12 (Reply #5)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:15 PM

7. I shudda said, "what does your research show you?

just my little way of encouraging an art conversation...sorry I was a bit lame...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #7)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:21 PM

11. ut it this way, I've been to St Peter's, and the Pieta, even behind

glass is clearly much smoother than this, however, the face is looking down, like in the Pieta AND I know I saw another version somewhere else, and I was susprised, then read that Michelangelo did a few others...I'd have to cheat to see where those other versions are...maybe one is in Florence.

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Response to joeybee12 (Reply #11)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:22 PM

13. Oh, no, when I say cheat I mean the trick we can all do. I don't mean research on Google.

sorry that isn't clear...

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Response to joeybee12 (Reply #11)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 03:30 AM

76. I've seen The Pieta in real life, think it was when we went to a World's Fair when I was a kid

Even at that age, I was very impressed, could tell it was special. But didn't some lunatic attack it and do some serious damage?

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Response to Rhiannon12866 (Reply #76)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 03:38 AM

78. I saw it at St. Peter's Basilica in 1972

I'm an art dunce, but visiting ther Vatican, the Louvre and Florence were the art highlights of my long-ago European trip. Also, seeing some of the tombs of historical figures in England's churches brought me to tears... My emotional reaction was one I didn't expect.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #78)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 03:45 AM

79. I've forgotten when that was, but I remember being grateful that I saw it intact

I should look it up...

And I can understand your reaction. I haven't been to Italy (yet), but I've been to Ireland, England and Russia and just the age of the art and the buildings is mind boggling. In Russia, the Kremlin was built in 1492 (by Italian artisans) and I visited a 9th-century church. It's pretty overwhelming...

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Response to Rhiannon12866 (Reply #79)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 04:02 AM

80. I also had a very emotional reaction visiting the Smithsonian

I was a USC Junior doing their 'D.C. Semester' program in 1977. I had an internship with a dem congressman, and we did some USC field trips--including one to the Smithsonian on which one of their experts took us up to the Smithsonian "attic" for items not on current exhibit. Seeing Theodore Roosevelt's original Teddy Bear, Abraham Lincoln's desk, and JFK's rocking chair blew me away...

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #80)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 05:55 AM

84. Wow!

That must have been amazing! Both because of the experience in D.C. and seeing those amazing possessions. The Teddy Bear would been the one that would make me

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Response to Rhiannon12866 (Reply #84)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 06:00 AM

86. For me it wasn't the Teddy Bear--it was the desk and the rocking chair

It was Lincoln and Kennedy.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #86)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 06:55 AM

93. I can certainly identify with that

Had to be both emotional and amazing to actually see them. Have you seen the Lincoln movie? It's supposed to be pretty accurate at capturing the real person. I went to a book signing/lecture with Doris Kearns Goodwin and was pretty impressed with the depth of her knowledge, closest we'll ever come to the real thing, but you had a much more personal experience...

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Response to Rhiannon12866 (Reply #93)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 12:42 PM

102. No, I haven't seen the movie yet

Nice that you got to see Goodwin--I love hearing her when she comes up on the cable news shows.

I ended up staying in the D.C. area, living there for 16 years 10 miles from the Lincoln Memorial and, for a couple of years, working at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

It was only later, when I was on the Kerry campaign website, that I learned about the then-new FDR Memorial in D.C.--and one member of the couple who created the Kerry site took me to visit that Memorial on a visit to D.C. shortly after the '04 election. Another powerful and very moving place, especially seeing it at that time...after volunteering for Kerry for a couple of months in battleground Ohio and then seeing Bush declared the winner. If that won't bring you to tears, nothing will.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #102)

Sun Feb 24, 2013, 03:09 AM

106. She was really impressive in person, an encyclopedia of information

I knew that she'd also written on FDR and Johnson, but she knew LBJ personally, interned for him. Though she wasn't sure she'd still have the job, since she'd just written a piece against the Vietnam War...

I've only been to D.C. a couple of times, the second time spent mostly at Arlington. I plan to go again, possibly in the spring. How very cool that you spent so much time there, though it must have been heartbreaking working at the Vietnam Memorial. And the Lincoln Memorial can choke you up, just looking at photos...

I'll try to see the memorial to FDR, certainly a giant among our presidents. I was still somewhat new to politics in 2004, joined DU in 2003 after being scared witless by 9/11 and decided I'd better wake up. I know how I felt after Kerry "lost," felt physically sick for days since it made no sense, totally blindsided me, so that must have affected you so much more.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:05 PM

2. My new Friday diversion. R&K

Even though I am way out of element here. But it is yet another example of how on DU, education can be expansive.

on edit: I always google the answers.

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Response to longship (Reply #2)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:18 PM

10. i am always "outta my element" and it is always fun. nt

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:09 PM

4. #3 looks like the last republican national convention I went to

#6 Lewis and Clark

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Response to Angry Dragon (Reply #4)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:13 PM

6. Lewis and Clark, hmm...

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Response to Angry Dragon (Reply #4)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:17 PM

9. ha ha. lol. nt

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:16 PM

8. 3 is way interesting. nt

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Response to seabeyond (Reply #8)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:26 PM

15. The artist is way interesting, too...

He was kind of a DUer of his day...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #15)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:27 PM

16. well, you just gave it away. now i know. you made it TOOO easy. lol

i jest.

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Response to seabeyond (Reply #16)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:29 PM

17. well, maybe he was the Garry Trudeau of his day...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:21 PM

12. #2: Andrea Mantegna - Calvary (also called The Crucifixion)

Mantegna, Andrea (1431?-1506). An Italian painter and engraver, Mantegna painted heroic figures, often using a dramatic perspective that gives the viewer the illusion of looking up from below. The effect is somewhat the same as looking up from ground level at statues mounted on a pedestal.

http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/mantegna/



This is one of three panels that form the predella of the altarpiece Mantegna made for the San Zeno. The original painting is in the Louvre. The predella in the San Zeno currently shows a copy.

The painting is an example of Mantegna's excellent control of perspective, which is applied in two ways: atmospheric and linear.

The atmosperic perspective is created by the dark-to-light gradient in the sky. To our eyes light colors seem to be further away than dark colors. At the horizon the light blue of the sky merges with the light green of the landscape.

Linear perspective is applied in several ways. The crosses of the murderers (to the left and right of Jesus) have been turned slightly inwards, thus creating diagonal lines that lead to a point in the distance. So does the ridge of the mountain to the right. Even the cracks in the floor contribute to the composition of the painting.

http://www.artbible.info/art/large/26.html


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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #12)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:25 PM

14. whoa, Pinboy! Go back and google the Mantegna and then look again at what I posted.

P.S. I love your research on this!

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #14)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 05:02 AM

81. I've just been off on an Andrea Mantegna jag...

for the past hour or so and have now discovered his flair for the trompe l'oeil. Opening up a ceiling with an Oculus, complete with little cherubs looking down on the pious, in the "Camera Picta". Well, I never...in 1470!


Andrea Mantegna fresco on the ceiling of the The Bridal Chamber, Ducal Palace, Mantua, Italy c. 1465-1474

Who would have thunk it?

I did know what "Trompe l'oeil" meant before I discovered Mantegna, which is one of the reasons why I started digging into his works (actually, I started by looking at the comparison between the Degas copy and Mantegna's original).

We had an invasion of Giant Daddy Long Legs down at the Space Needle in Seattle last summer, when a young artist, Marlin Peterson, plopped two of them on the roof of the armory building, providing the neatest illusion for those looking down from our state's famous icon. Washington's own trompe l'oeil!

http://queenanne.komonews.com/news/arts-culture/775530-my-intention-was-not-make-innocent-patrons-space-needle-feel-prey

http://marlinpeterson.com/



Marlin Peterson's arachnid mural, as seen from the Space Needle. (Photo via Marlin Peterson)
http://blog.seattlepi.com/thebigblog/2012/08/31/why-giant-daddy-longlegs-are-attacking-the-seattle-center/

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Response to countryjake (Reply #81)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 05:14 AM

82. I know that ceiling well

Mainly from constantly running into it in my Friday challenge searches.

The Space Needle pics also are great--mainly for the shadows.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #82)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 06:03 AM

87. I can't believe how he's got those little cherub's heads...

even sticking out of the railings, some not even showing. I guess I just don't think of that sort of illusion so much when I imagine what those religious painter guys must have been like, their natures, I mean. Pretending that the room has a skylight...that room is a bridal chamber...it's too weird. But maybe that was the point, heaven was watching...cue the twilight zone music, heh.

Those spiders are neat when you look at them flat in his pictures on his web page...how he produced the effect and all. I'd love to see them, but we don't go down to Seattle much, anymore.

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Response to countryjake (Reply #87)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 06:13 AM

88. The most striking thing is the bird

I haven't researched what it is or why it's there, but it just strikes me as very weird.

The spider shadows, on the other hand, are intriguing. But my interest may just stem from my long-ago boyhood experience of catching Black Widows in my garage.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #88)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 06:29 AM

90. Isn't that a peacock?

I'm pretty sure that they would symbolize Jesus or immortality, maybe not in that picture, but lots of other religious paintings have them.

We used to have daddy long legs everywhere, on the outside walls of our house when I was a kid (noticed that they are no longer all over the place, last time I was back in Ohio). I used to enjoy holding them and letting them wander up my arms, when I had my little friends over to visit...guess I was a mean girl at heart who liked making people scream. Daddy Long Legs and June Bugs, gave those city slickers the willies.

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Response to countryjake (Reply #90)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 06:38 AM

91. You're probably right

But it still looks weird.

I grew up in SoCal, where Black Widows in the garages were normal. I once collected 36 in a jar.

In those days, a girl who could deal with spiders would be our hero.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #91)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 07:03 AM

95. All of us country kids liked to get the goats of our school friends...

I was also famous for losing people in the cornfields that surrounded us...I could never understand why they couldn't figure to just follow a row out.

Last time I was back home, I found a black Wolf Spider in my ancient old mother's bedroom. I put that in a jar to identify it and my brother had a conniption fit later when he found out that I'd released it back out in the woods. I guess they aren't supposed to be in that area but I sure wouldn't have harmed it. I don't kill spiders, never have. He was bigger than the mouth of the mayonnaise jar I stuck him in...body alone was humongous and his long hairy legs made him formidable, jumping at me when I tried to get him into it. I must admit, it kind of gave me the willies, too, but that's because of where I found him.

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Response to countryjake (Reply #95)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 07:10 AM

97. To this day, I consider spiders a blessing

They eliminate insects that can be problematic. I agree with the old axiom that spiders are good luck. Not to mention that their shadows are pretty.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #97)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 07:25 AM

99. Ya, me too, raised on a farm, we weren't allowed to kill spiders.

Then, when I left home, I fell in love with a fellow who believed in reincarnation and he always said that he wanted to come back as one, since he knew that I liked and respected spiders. I lost him to the Colorado River in 1972 and since then, I have rescued every single spider I've ever run across. That's not an easy thing to do, considering what I've done for a living thru most of my life...cleaning lady, here, and I've got to get going right now. (I always keep a jar in my bucket, just in case)

I wonder if that Bridal Chamber has shadows from the people peeking in, painted on the floor? That would be cool.

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Response to countryjake (Reply #99)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 01:01 PM

103. I'm sorry you lost your guy to the river



That was the same year I was touring Europe and seeing many of its art treasures. The monastery at Orvieto, in Italy, was a real treat. Not only for the art there, but also because the monks served us dinner, with some of the wine they made. I had a couple of cases shipped home.

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Response to countryjake (Reply #81)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 07:04 AM

96. Mantegna was considered a master of "foreshortening" which is done in abundance with those

cherubs...it was a big deal back in the day...so I guess the better you are at doing something that people expect and like, the more you'll do it...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:43 PM

18. 1st one, Madonna with child ...

Not sure where you're getting, but it was very unusual for displaying the 'virgin mother' not to look at her child nor to really hold it tightly but mostly in a manner of 'letting him go.' That's what I remember, though.

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Response to Call Me Wesley (Reply #18)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:46 PM

19. good, good...but where I am getting is what is or has gone on with this particular work of art?

HINT: do you notice the damage?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #19)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:56 PM

26. The Pietà was attacked,

this one was not. But it was put behind bulletproof glass. That's 'The Madonna of Bruges,' not the Pietà. She was moved around a bit, but I don't think she was damaged.

Did you mean the 'Pietà?'

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Response to Call Me Wesley (Reply #26)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 07:16 PM

48. Great! You are right! It is the Bruges Madonna! Hooray!

First, Napoleon, after his conquest, demanded that the Bruges Madonna be sent to Paris. It was and when Napoleon was defeated it was sent back. Then, in 1944, the Allies Monument Men raced to Bruges after the D Day invasion to save the Madonna but, in a heartbreaker, they arrived only a couple of days too late...the Madonna had been taken by the German Army. It was later found in a mine in Austria and then restored to its rightful place.

I saw the Bruges Madonna in 2012. It is fabulous. There are two sculptures above it flanking each side and they are of such poor quality it is embarassing...

Michelangelo sculpted this work in the same year he was working on the David and after he had done the Pieta. There are art historians who claim that he had originally planned the work for the Pope but got a better offer from Bruges...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:49 PM

20. If you squish your eye right next to #4

there is memento mori.. (this I recall from decades ago Art History class)

There are tricks here & there I suspect.

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Response to annabanana (Reply #20)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:52 PM

23. I saw it called "anapomorphosis." But it is a famous work of art in addition to that...

and by an absolute master...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #23)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:57 PM

45. The title is 'The Ambassadors'

I found a detailed discussion of it:

The characters found in the work are presumably Jean Dinteville, a French ambassador, and Georges de Selve, a bishop, who also served as Ambassador of the Republic of Venice and the Holy See. Although there is debate about the identity of the characters, the National Gallery in London seems to have no doubts.

As you can see, Holbein fused portrait and still life in The Ambassadors. To interpret it, is necessary to understand the artist’s obsession with symbols. Both the two ambassadors and the objects can be interpreted symbolically.

If we look carefully, the costumes of the ambassadors are radically different. While the French ambassador on the left uses couture, mundane clothing; the bishop wears a religious garb.

The objects included are clearly differentiated from each other. On the shelf, in the upper level, we see elements that refer to heaven: a celestial globe (to study the stars), a quadrant, a Torquetum (an astronomical calculator) and more. On the lowest level, objects that refer to earth: a globe, books and musical instruments. In the foreground, we see a strange diagonal, which is one of the most interesting features of the painting: a skull painted by anamorphosis, a technique where you draw a figure that can’t be identified when viewed from the front. It is only visible when it’s looked from another perspective. The ambassadors was supposed to be hung on the landing of a staircase, so the skull could be seen as you lower the stairs. Symbolically, the skull universally represents death.

With these indicators, Holbein shows us the spiritual world at different levels of the painting: heaven, earth and hell. Men, between them, are among the eternal conflict of belief in a higher power or not.



http://silverandexact.com/2012/05/18/the-ambassadors-hans-holbein-the-younger-1533/



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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #45)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 08:12 PM

60. There are a lot of interesting things about it. nt

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:51 PM

21. Number 4 is, I believe, ...

... a detail from a Hans Holbein portrait, which shows a skull if seen from an unusual angle.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:51 PM

22. The 4th is really intriguing.

I know it, so I don't say, but it's fun to see that this technique is coming back in various urban and architectural places. You just need the perfect spot.

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Response to Call Me Wesley (Reply #22)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:54 PM

24. where do you see this in urban and architectural places? I'd love to research that!!!

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Response to Call Me Wesley (Reply #28)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 07:59 PM

58. thank you for giving me more things to research in an area I love!

this is wonderful...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #24)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:05 PM

29. Sidewalk art that only 'works' from one perspective..

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Response to X_Digger (Reply #29)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:10 PM

32. That is amazing, too!

Really cool!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 05:54 PM

25. #3

is the Humors of an Election painting by William Hogarth.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:William_Hogarth_028.jpg

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Response to Go Vols (Reply #25)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:00 PM

27. It is Hogarthl I have found a different title, however...with an explanation as to what it means..

That information is in the work itself...but a bit obscure today...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #27)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:06 PM

30. 'An Election Entertainment'

Painting by William Hogarth, ca. 1755; original title: "An Election Entertainment", from the series known as "The Humours of an Election" or (when engraved) "Four Prints of an Election".

Includes famous "Give us our Eleven Days" protest slogan against the Gregorian calendar at lower right (on black banner on floor under foot).

According to Hogarth: A Life and a World by Jenny Uglow, this was loosely based on the 1754 Oxfordshire elections, in which the 1752 calendar change was one of a number of issues brought up by Tory opponents to the Whig candidate for MP (the son of George Parker, 2nd Earl of Macclesfield, who had been influential in passing the calendar law). The painting shows a Whig banquet, and "Give us our Eleven Days" is a stolen Tory campaign banner.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:William_Hogarth_028.jpg

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #30)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:15 PM

36. Excellent! Funny how this stuff really agitated folks back in the day...

I think part of it centered around rents becoming due 11 days earlier with the new calendar. Nothing like doing something like that to piss people off!

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #36)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 05:43 AM

83. Can't believe this is the same guy who did "The Shrimp Girl"!

I love looking at all that's going on in that Hogarth painting you've provided here, (quite the entertainment) but then I thought that I remembered his name and checked for him in a print book. It says that Shrimp Girl was unfinished, but what a difference between the vivid figures in "An Election Entertainment" and her image.


The Shrimp Girl by William Hogarth c. 1740–1745

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Response to countryjake (Reply #83)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 05:56 AM

85. I see similarities there in his depictions of people

That seems pretty consistent.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #85)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 06:45 AM

92. Did you notice the lobster down in the corner?

Looks like he's eating the meat off of the plate. I really love that painting!

I guess it's because the shrimp girl was never completed, but it looks so much more fuzzy to me. I'll have to google that one now and Hogarth, cause my book says he was a political satirist. (and CTyankee called him the Garry Trudeau of his day)

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:08 PM

31. 6 looks like an early Spanish map of the New World

which concentrated on some of the territory they'd conquered and were stating to exploit and ending the continent above and below early New Spain and the Caribbean.

It's not the 17th century Moll map most of us are familiar with. It has either drawn Cuba very large and misplaced or has put the Yucatan east of Florida, suggesting it's extreme earliness.

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Response to Warpy (Reply #31)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:13 PM

33. I wonder if that's a clue.. perspective.. n/t

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Response to Warpy (Reply #31)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:18 PM

37. This IS an early map certainly, but it appears in a painting by a non-Hispanic genius who was

working in this era...and it's one of two (as I recall)...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #37)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:56 PM

44. Is it a Vemeer?

I see the word "Holland" up there at the top of that world map, (and West Friesland right above Greenland).

Oops, found it!

Jan Vermeer, 1658, "Soldier and a Laughing Girl"


Detail of both the painting and the world map, within:
http://www.essentialvermeer.com/catalogue/officer_and_laughing_girl.html


And here's another one he did, of the same map:


"Woman in Blue Reading a Letter"

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Response to countryjake (Reply #44)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 07:10 PM

46. Nice! And it looks like the story behind this one is the 'Golden Rectangle.'

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Response to countryjake (Reply #44)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 07:19 PM

49. Yes, indeed! Here is a quote from an art historian:

Brooks departs from the painting on numerous other angles, but none as rich as his venture from the map hanging on the wall in the background. Using the painting both literally and as a metaphor for an unknown world, Brooks explores the history of Samuel de Champlain's campaigns against the various indigenous tribes of the St Lawrence River area. Notice that the in the map, the colors are reversed with the oceans in brown earth tones and the land in blue. Brooks suggests this play by Vermeer was a symbolic recognition of the uncertainty of geography at the time and likewise depicts Champlain's ventures as guided by geographic uncertainty.

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #49)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 07:41 PM

52. Remember the Vermeer with the globe, The Astronomer, I think it's called...

I'm pretty sure that one also has a map on it, too.

In searching Jan Vermeer for the one you've challenged us with, I found numerous others on the Google images page that I ended up on.

Vermeer's all containing painted maps:

Lute Player
Young Woman with Water Pitcher
Love Letter
Allegory of Painting
Girl Asleep at Table


I think the guy just really dug cool maps, ha!

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Response to countryjake (Reply #52)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 07:44 PM

54. You are such a dear, countryjake! Love you!

And I particularly love your research into the Vermeer's! You do notice, of course, how he reversed the blue water and the earth colored land in this painting, didn't you? THAT is the real answer to this one question!

so much of the New World intrigued and mystified the guy...incredible...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #54)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 08:17 PM

61. There's an intriguing explanation of that reversal...

at the link I originally posted when I discovered the painting, about the yellow-over-blue glazes used by some Dutch painters.

Hover over the map on the painting to bring up the detail of it, then left click again, so that you are able to scroll down and read all of the analysis that's to the right. It's just a speculation, of course.

I am amazed at the details he labored on, in all of the wall hangings he's presented within his work. Also, the map hanging in "Woman in Blue Reading a Letter" doesn't exactly have the "blue land" like it does in your challenge one, even tho it appears to be the same map.

Very cool challenge this week and neat questions! Thank you, CTyankee!

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #37)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 07:15 PM

47. I think this is the other one:

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #47)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 07:20 PM

50. Heh, note my update...

Last edited Fri Feb 22, 2013, 08:42 PM - Edit history (2)

I don't know about that "golden rectangle", will have to read up on it, but see the link I also "updated" with on my original post. There's some interesting background on Vermeer and his map depictions on that page.

Here's another that looks like it may be the very same map, too. In the foreground, on left.


"The Love Letter" c. 1670

http://www.navigo.com/wm/paint/auth/vermeer/

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:13 PM

34. I FOUND WALDO IN #3!!!!!!!!!

Finally got one!

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #34)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:19 PM

38. Oh, thank god, jberryhill! I didn't want you to be all out of sorts here...

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #34)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:21 PM

39. LOL! (nt)

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #34)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 06:26 AM

89. While completeley missing Carmen Sandiego in #2

Some art researcher you are!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:14 PM

35. I'm thinking they all have tricks of perspective but don't understand the Madonna at all.

Some of the links are fascinating. Thank you.

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Response to Shrike47 (Reply #35)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:23 PM

40. No, there is not one overarching theme here. Just individual stories about them...

no grand theme.

The Madonna has a fascinating history, IOW. What is it and where is it and why? It is not a crazy story nor is it very surprising given world events .

HINT FOR #1: This work was stolen by two conquering nations in its history. It is now where it should be...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #40)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:34 PM

42. That's what I was asking.

She got moved a few times. First during the French Revolution, later moved back, then the Nazis stole it. But I still don't think it was damaged.

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Response to Call Me Wesley (Reply #42)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 08:05 PM

59. I'm not sure it could be moved at all without the damage you can see.

If it sat in a church all these years, it would probably be pristine unless someone attacked it. But being moved (it weighs a couple of tons) is risky at best. In the 18th century it would have been pretty dicey. During WW2 with the retreating German Army it could have been hastily and not easily removed in a rush to get out. Then it was placed in a salt mine in Austria . Ya think it could get a few nicks in those experiences? I do...

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Response to Shrike47 (Reply #35)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 07:30 PM

51. OK, here's the thing. It doesn't have to be just ONE trick of anything...it was meant to

discuss some of the stories behind these different works of art.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:26 PM

41. Outtakes from Monty Python's "A Life of Brian"


He shoots, he scores!!

Finally a Friday Challenge I can play.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 06:46 PM

43. #4--a memento morii

Grossly foreshortened by Holbein the Younger I won't give the spoiler away so others can figure out what it is.

Thanks for the fun challenge!

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Response to lapislzi (Reply #43)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 07:42 PM

53. Here is a major hint...

HINT on #2: a 19th century "registered copyist" at a famous museum did this work.

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #53)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 07:48 PM

55. Then it has to be the copy placed in the San Zeno, done by a Louvre copyist

The original panels are in the Louvre.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #55)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 07:51 PM

56. No, it is by a famous artist. His work is also in the Louvre. He is French.

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #56)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 08:24 PM

62. Is it Edgar Degas?

Last edited Fri Feb 22, 2013, 10:01 PM - Edit history (1)

He was a copyist in the Louvre when he was young.

Edited to add:

Degas "copied the works of the old masters in the Louvre, a practice he kept up for many years."

Degas's Techniques

In copying the Old Masters, Degas sometimes attempted to uncover their techniques. For example, when he copied Andrea Mantegna and some of the Venetians, Degas tried to simulate the Venetian method of building up the canvas with layers of cool and warm tones by a series of glazes. From the mid-1870s he worked increasingly in pastel; and in his last years, when his sight was failing, he abandoned oil completely in favor of pastel, which he handled more broadly and with greater freedom than before.

Hilaire Germain Edgar Degas Biography
http://biography.yourdictionary.com/hilaire-germain-edgar-degas


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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #62)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:57 PM

70. thereyou go, Pinboy! You can tell there is an Impressionist afoot in the execution of his copy.

Intriguing that he did it "his way."

Nice research...you get an A plus...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #70)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 02:30 AM

73. You may be less impressed with my research skills when I tell you...

...that in my initial searches I skipped over all the "Calvary, after a painting by Andrea Mantegna" entries that swamped my results--because I thought they were just retail sites hawking repros.

But there are NO takebacks on class grades.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #73)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 07:01 AM

94. I learned about Degas doing this in an essay I mentioned during the Challenge two weeks ago...

the one with the two versions of "Agony in the Garden." It was a nice article on why Mantegna matters. I had just obtained at book from the library on the Impressionists so I looked it up in that book and there was no mention! So a Google search brought it right up with lots of info. A search for "impressionist version of The Crucifixion by Mantegna" would probably bring it up, too.

Before that, I had no clue...who knew???

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 07:58 PM

57. HINT on #5: It is part of one of the most famous works of art in Western Europe.

And it is extremely important in the development of Western European art.

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #57)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 08:32 PM

63. Is it a tapestry?

Reminds me of the Unicorn works up at the Cloisters.

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #57)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 09:06 PM

64. Jan van Eyck - (a panel of) the Ghent Altarpiece nt

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #64)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 09:07 PM

65. You are too fast!

I just found it, too!

It's the size of a barn door, weighs more than an elephant, and is one of the most famous and coveted paintings in the world.

http://www.npr.org/2010/12/25/132283848/is-this-the-worlds-most-coveted-painting


"Adoration of the Mystic Lamb"


Oh my god!

Then, in 1566, all hell broke loose. Protestant militants broke down the cathedral doors with an improvised battering ram, intending to burn the altarpiece, which they considered to be an example of Catholic idolatry and excess. But alert Catholic guards had disassembled the enormous work and hidden it in the cathedral tower, where it survived unscathed.

And here is the answer to CTyankee's question:

Enduring Mystery

The Ghent Altarpiece didn't stay safe for long. Thieves broke into the cathedral one night in 1934 and made off with the lower left panel.

"This is the enduring mystery that really is part of the popular cultural awareness of the people of Ghent still to this day," Charney says.

The theft has never been solved. Visitors to St. Bavo Cathedral today will see a copy of the missing panel, painted during World War II. The copy is so good that many people thought it might be the original, hidden in plain sight, though recent conservation work has disproved that theory.

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Response to countryjake (Reply #65)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 09:19 PM

67. LOL! Also--A minor panel of the masterpiece was stolen in 1934:

Art's perfect theft: the 'Ghent Altarpiece'
By RAF CASERT | Associated Press – Mon, Nov 19, 2012

GHENT, Belgium (AP) — The main suspect in the legendary art heist is said to have whispered with his dying breath: "Only I know where the 'Adoration' is..."

More than seven decades later, the whereabouts of a panel belonging to one of Western art's defining works, the "Adoration of the Mystic Lamb," also known as the "Ghent Altarpiece," remains a mystery.

If the stunning heist of Picasso, Monet and Matisse paintings in Rotterdam, Netherlands, last month focused attention on the murky world of art theft, the gothic Saint Bavo cathedral in Ghent has been at the center of a crime that has bedeviled the art world for decades.

"The Just Judges" panel of the Van Eyck brothers' multi-panel Gothic masterpiece hasn't been seen since 1934, when chief suspect Arsene Goedertier suffered a stroke at a political rally and died after murmuring those fateful words to a confidant.

...


Ghent was hit by two thefts on the night of April 10, 1934: "One was a wheel of cheese," said detective Jan De Kesel. "The other was the panel."

...


http://news.yahoo.com/arts-perfect-theft-ghent-altarpiece-075958588.html



The story notes that investigation of the art theft was slowed down because the cheese theft case was given priority.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #67)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 09:27 PM

69. Neener neeners...see my update to #65!

Man, wouldn't ya love to actually be searching for that one in Belgium? A real treasure hunt! Thanks for that link and article, pinboy.

From pinboy's link:

Ever since, Belgium has been in the grip of a decades-long treasure hunt, one that has drawn detectives of every ilk: cab drivers, computer scientists, lawyers, retired police inspectors, among others.

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Response to countryjake (Reply #69)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 02:47 AM

74. Nice again!

You beat me and I didn't know it because it was an edit to a post I'd already seen.

Our weekly challenge is more a collaborative effort than an individual competition. I may race to find a work, but Im happy to see others finding them, too--even when I'm aced out. We learn things and bring them back to share for the benefit of all. Plus it's a kick seeing CTyankee having a chance to indulge in the discussions she enjoys so much!

And, as a final saving grace--at least I'm slightly less of an art dunce than I used to be.


Nice working with you!

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #74)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 03:36 AM

77. Maybe you can help me with this...

I've been unable to compare that Mantegna, the original of the one from which Degas painted his copy. What was the Mantegna titled?

I've quietly enjoyed this challenge for some time now, but haven't ever felt able to participate because I really am a bona fide art dunce. I do always google the paintings after-the-fact and read all of the links you and CTyankee and some of the others have normally provided and that has been pretty much my entire education where the art world is concerned. I did skim off of the learning that my daughter managed when she went to college (saved all of her textbooks and read them) and did the same as a kid when my big brother studied Art History, but other than that, as CTyankee has probably figured by now, I know absolutely nothing and I couldn't tell a Mannerist from a Realist just by looking. But I've always been interested.

You must excuse my glee of discovery, for I'm aware that you are no "dunce", at all, and I was pretty pleased with that research I did earlier.

It was a fun afternoon! My man passed by the computer while I was fixing supper and wanted to know what all those weird pictures were on the google page that I'd left it at, ha! (a stubborn guy who wouldn't enter a museum if it was the last building on earth)

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Response to countryjake (Reply #77)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 07:21 AM

98. It is from the St. Zeno Altarpiece in Verona, Italy (one of my fave places!).

Last edited Sat Feb 23, 2013, 08:42 AM - Edit history (1)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Zeno_Altarpiece_%28Mantegna%29

It is the second of three smaller pieces running along the bottom of the altarpiece (called a predella). You'll see how he does the Agony in the early evening, the Crucifixion at high noon, and the Resurrection at dawn. Predelle were commonly done to tell points in the story above.

Napoleon's army stole the altarpiece and brought it back to France. When Napoleon was defeated, the people of Verona wanted it back. They got it, but not before the French peeled off the predelle (bastids!). This one is in the Louvre....and the other in a museum in Tours.

There are more stories about St. Zeno and WW2, some SAD about what was lost during bombing. I will share the article with you a bit later as I will be tutoring ESL here this morning. I'll find that essay and post it "for all the new Mantegna fans!"


Isn't it gorgeous?





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Response to CTyankee (Reply #98)

Sun Feb 24, 2013, 08:17 PM

107. Thanks, CTyankee!

As you can see from my other replies, I had managed to find Mantegna's altar paintings (by just scrolling up the thread and finding pinboy's early guess on what turned out to be the Degas copy). Anyhow, after my "duh" moment, I spent a goodly amount of time Friday night (and into Sat. morning) viewing and enjoying so much of his work, drawn in by what many pages had said of his treatment of perspective and that "foreshortening" which you've mentioned, also. I like his ability to pull a person right into one of his paintings with the details and angling, but the off-color ones which almost resemble carved statues are pretty cool, too.

The stuff that has gone on thru the ages regarding so many artworks, like with that massive Jan van Eyck altar piece, doesn't surprise me at all (the desire to possess "beauty" might be in us all), but the damage done to them by conflict, despots, and wars is sad and disgusting, to put it mildly. As with the looting of Iraq, that raid on wondrous creations from the very beginnings of civilization, treasures of Mesopotamia, which we all were made aware of early on during our country's Invasion, nations never do stop to think much of the consequences of aggression.

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Response to countryjake (Reply #107)

Sun Feb 24, 2013, 08:25 PM

108. Oh, I am so glad you like this stuff. I am a hard core case so it's hopeless with me!

But you are a great and ardent fan and I am so glad!

Please do get "The Rape of Europa" by Lynn Nichols out of your library and read it (it is also a PBS special if you can find the video). It catalogs the theft of the art of Western europe by HItler and is just eye opening! What an amazing book! I was enthralled the entire time reading it.

But I'm afraid that once you get started you will, like me, get somewhat "addicted" to this art study...it's a nice addiction, of course, but still...pretty time consuming...

Cheers!

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Response to countryjake (Reply #65)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 12:08 AM

71. there is a copy on the main floor of St. Bavo's and the real deal is in a basement room where

you pay a little extra to see it. It's pretty huge, 12 feet high (it must have been a pain in the arse to steal that panel).

It has been undergoing some restoration over the past year. Fascinating article in the New YOrker by art critic Peter Schjeldahl on that process, several months ago.

I saw the Ghent Altarpiece in October of last year. Incredible work.

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #71)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 12:33 AM

72. Did you read pinboy's yahoo article?

The local bishop produced only a fraction of the ransom demand and more extortion letters followed.

Then Goedertier died, yielding another clue in his apparent confession: "In my office ... drawer ... closet." There, copies of the old extortion letters and the draft of a new one were found.

Adding to the theft's mystique, this last one read: "'The Just Judges' are in a place where neither I nor anyone else can take it without drawing the public's attention." Police also found indecipherable drawings possibly pointing to a hiding place...


One of the more popular theories is that Goedertier, a stockbroker, may never have taken the panel out of the cathedral, but hidden it somewhere inside. But lifting every pane or tile in the massive St. Bavo would carry a prohibitive cost and risk damaging the historic edifice.


You are so lucky to have seen it! I can imagine myself poking around in the St. Bavo, tapping on things, peering behind stuff looking for secret hiding places; they'd throw my butt outta there quick! The most stolen artwork of all time, tho, amazing. I can't help but wonder if that mob of Calvinists had succeeded in burning it, early on, would we ever have even heard of it?

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Response to countryjake (Reply #72)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 08:53 AM

100. St. Bavo is pretty large and I think you'd be as overwhelmed by it as I was, walking around...

The room where the real altarpiece is kept (a copy is on the main floor but you can see the real one for a few extra euros) is tiny and you are chock a block with all the other people viewing it. Ghent is actually a big city (I had this funny idea that it was a little town).

We managed to "art tour" that region of Belgium entirely on public transportation and on foot. It was a sort of "pilgrimage" (nonreligious, however)...Bruges, Ghent, Antwerp (Rubens!) and of course Brussels itself. I nearly busted my arse quite literally, pulling a gluteal muscle I didn't even know I had...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 09:08 PM

66. Made sure to check this today. #4

#4 is from the "Ambassadors" by Hans Holbein the Younger. The white thing in the center is an anamorphically distorted image of a human skull. The undistorted image may be recovered using a cylindrical mirror of the correct radius.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 09:21 PM

68. Guessing #5

I see faint impressions of Fleurs-de-Lys on the horse's caparison in #5. From that and the rider's mien, it is probably a King of France. From the 14th-15th centuries. So Charles the Mad? Is this before he attacked his own knights in a fit of madness?

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 03:15 AM

75. In #4, The Ambassadors, the skull has a special meaning.

"Holbein" means "hollow bone" and the skull is a hollow bone!!!

Fabulous art history prof at the University of Houston told us that, Dr. Peter Wolfgang Guenther.
Supposedly his parents were art dealers in Berlin, and he played on Paul Klee's knee.



His daughter Irene wrote a book on fashion during the Nazi era.


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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 12:29 PM

101. For all you newly minted Mantegna fans!

Here is a great piece from The New Republic of Dec. 31, 2008: http://www.newrepublic.com/article/books/why-mantegna-matters#

The author is the curator of European Paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #101)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 03:43 PM

104. A great review!


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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #104)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 04:05 PM

105. thanks, pinboy! Ya done good on this Challenge (altho you always do).

We'll do it all again next week...

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