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Fri Feb 22, 2013, 10:34 AM

The babies who nap in sub-zero temperatures

Daytime temperatures this winter in Stockholm have regularly dropped to -5C (23F) but it's still common to see children left outside by their parents for a sleep in the pram.

Wander through the snowy city and you'll see buggies lined up outside coffee shops while parents sip on lattes inside.

And if you are visiting friends and your child needs a nap, you may be offered the garden or balcony instead of a bedroom.

"I think it's good for them to be in the fresh air as soon as possible," says Lisa Mardon, a mother-of-three from Stockholm, who works for a food distribution company.

"Especially in the winter when there's lots of diseases going around... the kids seem healthier."

Her children have been sleeping outside since they were born.

The youngest, Alfred, is two and she puts him outside in the pram to nap once a day, for an hour and a half. When he was younger he slept outside twice a day.

This isn't a recent fashion. Lisa's mother, Gunilla, now 61, says she also did it with Lisa when she was a baby.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21537988

uhhhh....WHUT

Doesn't exposed flesh freeze after a certain amount of time outside??

60 replies, 4898 views

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Arrow 60 replies Author Time Post
Reply The babies who nap in sub-zero temperatures (Original post)
Blue_Tires Feb 2013 OP
TwilightGardener Feb 2013 #1
Duer 157099 Feb 2013 #46
Recursion Feb 2013 #2
bettyellen Feb 2013 #8
laundry_queen Feb 2013 #3
Kalidurga Feb 2013 #4
Yo_Mama Feb 2013 #34
Brickbat Feb 2013 #5
Blue_Tires Feb 2013 #13
Brickbat Feb 2013 #17
Angry Dragon Feb 2013 #20
sad-cafe Feb 2013 #21
Marrah_G Feb 2013 #41
karynnj Feb 2013 #60
RC Feb 2013 #33
Marrah_G Feb 2013 #6
BlancheSplanchnik Feb 2013 #48
FarCenter Feb 2013 #7
Tikki Feb 2013 #11
Marrah_G Feb 2013 #14
dixiegrrrrl Feb 2013 #49
Recursion Feb 2013 #9
siligut Feb 2013 #12
Marrah_G Feb 2013 #16
siligut Feb 2013 #18
Marrah_G Feb 2013 #19
RC Feb 2013 #35
siligut Feb 2013 #39
RC Feb 2013 #43
siligut Feb 2013 #45
Marrah_G Feb 2013 #15
Fearless Feb 2013 #26
politicat Feb 2013 #37
siligut Feb 2013 #10
FSogol Feb 2013 #22
BlancheSplanchnik Feb 2013 #51
kestrel91316 Feb 2013 #23
hedgehog Feb 2013 #24
marybourg Feb 2013 #28
siligut Feb 2013 #32
Tsiyu Feb 2013 #57
hunter Feb 2013 #36
FarCenter Feb 2013 #44
MrsMatt Feb 2013 #25
Skittles Feb 2013 #52
IdaBriggs Feb 2013 #27
gollygee Feb 2013 #29
The Straight Story Feb 2013 #30
BlancheSplanchnik Feb 2013 #54
year of the cat Feb 2013 #31
surrealAmerican Feb 2013 #38
year of the cat Feb 2013 #42
Mopar151 Feb 2013 #40
Buns_of_Fire Feb 2013 #47
JaneyVee Feb 2013 #50
Taverner Feb 2013 #53
littlewolf Feb 2013 #55
Javaman Feb 2013 #56
LittleBlue Feb 2013 #58
pansypoo53219 Feb 2013 #59

Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 10:37 AM

1. Bundle 'em up, shove 'em outside. Good for ya, builds character.

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Response to TwilightGardener (Reply #1)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 01:08 PM

46. Yep. Just make sure they have a diaper on.

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 10:39 AM

2. Don't they have like the highest suicide rate in the industrialized world?

Another piece of the puzzle...

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Response to Recursion (Reply #2)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:04 AM

8. and mega drinking problems abound.

I know some people who have relocated, big drinkers and all say that in the winter, it's just too much boozing and stir craziness.

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 10:41 AM

3. LOL

Only at extreme temperatures. -5C is not extreme. If a child is bundled up and shielded from the wind, they will be fine. My mom used to take me on walks in a sled when I was small for an hour or so at a time when it was colder than -5C.

Here in Canada, my daughters' schools make the kids go outside up until it's -20C. The schools believe the fresh air is better for the kids and the kids need it especially in the winter. Indoor days at school are rare.

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 10:51 AM

4. I thought this was going to be a story about penguins.

I really don't know what to think about this except that we shouldn't try it in the US. First off you can't just leave your child outside a place of business any business. Secondly most wouldn't have a clue on how to do it properly.

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Response to Kalidurga (Reply #4)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:23 PM

34. It's the custom over there

People go in restaurants and shops and leave their kids outside in buggies.

There was a big uproar about a Danish tourist who did this in NYC and had her child removed:
http://www.nytimes.com/1997/05/15/nyregion/danish-mother-is-reunited-with-her-baby.html

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 10:53 AM

5. 23F is actually a really nice day, if you're used to it.

I live in Minnesota; I never kept my babies inside when it was cold. They have to learn sometime!

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Response to Brickbat (Reply #5)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:11 AM

13. No way in hell...

I'll take 103F over 23F all day, every day...

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Response to Blue_Tires (Reply #13)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:14 AM

17. Haaa, I'm totally the opposite. I go to pieces once it gets above 80.

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Response to Blue_Tires (Reply #13)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:31 AM

20. 23F with sun and no wind is a warm day

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Response to Blue_Tires (Reply #13)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:45 AM

21. I agree

 

I hate the cold

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Response to Blue_Tires (Reply #13)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:53 PM

41. I think alot of it has to do with what you are used to

I would be VERY sick in 103 degrees, but 23 degress, unless its really windy, I probably won't have on a coat.

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Response to Blue_Tires (Reply #13)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 04:26 PM

60. Not me - that's why we retired to Burlington VT rather than Florida.

My husband, dog and I have gone on long walks at 23 degrees, bundled appropriately and it was beautiful in the fresh air. 103 degrees - and I would not even think of going out - way too hot.

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Response to Brickbat (Reply #5)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:22 PM

33. I've shoveled snow in temperatures colder than that, in my short shirt sleeves.

 

And was still sweating. Cold is when you have to zip up your jacked, like when it is -20F (-29C) or more.
Gloves are needed at -30.

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 10:55 AM

6. Unless there is some epidemic there of kids freezing to death...

... then why worry? Their ancestors have lived there since people have lived there.

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Response to Marrah_G (Reply #6)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 01:15 PM

48. thank you!

Geez, gasping over customs that no one there has a problem with....

I WISH people here would leave their kids outside of restaurants! Ha. Ha. Just kidding. Sort of.

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:04 AM

7. The key technological breakthrough was the invention of needles and sewing

About 35,000 years ago the needle and sewing was invented. This allowed making of multilayer, tailored clothing. Eurasians were able to move north when glacial conditions during the last ice age allowed it, following herds of mammoth, musk ox, reindeer, etc.

As the article concludes:

There is a Swedish saying that encapsulates this thought - "There is no bad weather, only bad clothing."

Another saying sums up what Swedes are likely to think when toddlers in other countries are kept indoors in sub-zero temperatures: "A little fresh air never hurt anyone."


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Response to FarCenter (Reply #7)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:08 AM

11. ..and here some say.."It is better to look good than to feel good, darling"




Tikki

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Response to FarCenter (Reply #7)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:12 AM

14. hehe!

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Response to FarCenter (Reply #7)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 01:16 PM

49. Why are babies left outside and the parents are INSIDE?

If freezing weather is so good for a person, why not sit outside and drink your coffee, eat your food, etc.
whatever the parents are doing inside...

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:06 AM

9. After a couple of years in Boston I thought of 20s as shirtsleeve weather

*shrug*

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Response to Recursion (Reply #9)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:09 AM

12. In Alaska, I was surprised to see people in shorts in 40 degree weather

It's relative

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Response to siligut (Reply #12)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:13 AM

16. We used to ski in shorts an Tee's in the early, spring in New England

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Response to Marrah_G (Reply #16)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:20 AM

18. Ahhh and if you fell?

Same thing riding a bike without protective clothing, everything is wonderful until you lose your balance.

Still, I understand that shouldn't stop the fun.

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Response to siligut (Reply #18)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:24 AM

19. Yup- we fell

The snow melts right off.

Sometimes we even got a scrape or two, no big deal.

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Response to siligut (Reply #18)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:25 PM

35. We didn't have body armor for bike riding when I was a kid.

 

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Response to RC (Reply #35)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:51 PM

39. Motor bikes?

I know I wasn't specific, but I still have the scars from road rash on my arms, very faint.

That was when I was young. There is a good reason bikers wear leather.

I am not a killjoy.

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Response to siligut (Reply #39)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:58 PM

43. Oh, them things.

 

I was thinking of pedal bikes.

I had street bike at one time. ALWAYS word a helmet. The only time dropped it was when my passenger shifted their weight when I was going around a corner.

Edited to add - The bottom of both pegs were scrapped from the pavement from leaning in the turns. I likes to see the horizon tip back and forth.

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Response to RC (Reply #43)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 01:05 PM

45. We were going through road construction, at night, after drinks

It was all weaving fun until that median miraculously jumped out too far. Skidded, I remember the sparks, I rolled, but the landing gave me the rash. Had to get back on and out of there before the police came.

Had a helmet on though, always wore a helmet.

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Response to Recursion (Reply #9)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:13 AM

15. I regularly go out it freezing temps without a coat

It has to be REALLY cold for me to wear one.

I also wear sandals most of the time

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Response to Recursion (Reply #9)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:04 PM

26. Yup.

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Response to Recursion (Reply #9)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:27 PM

37. Yep, in Colorado, too.

Shirt sleeves or a light cardigan is good to about 20. Under 20F? Grab a hoodie. It's gotta be in the low teens before I break out the wool coat.

I assume the babies are properly dressed - wool or technical fleece hat, layers of non-cotton and extremities kept covered. Keep the feet, hands and head warm and everything else is usually good.

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:07 AM

10. Mammals create their own heat

Keep them well bundled and out of the wind, no problem. May even contribute to improved physiologic adaptation.

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Response to siligut (Reply #10)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:46 AM

22. Same here. As a fellow mammal I generate my own heat, but I don't usually brag about it.

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Response to FSogol (Reply #22)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 01:19 PM

51. radiant's not so bad, but that's probably best...

If you're talkin about forced air.











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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:50 AM

23. Doesn't exposed flesh freeze after a certain amount of time outside??

Er, not at 23F it doesn't.

Sub-zero in Sweden would be in Celcius rather than Fahrenheit.

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:56 AM

24. I suspect this practice developed years ago when tuberculosis qwas a serious problem.

The other possibility is that it's an effort to get some exposure to sunlight.

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Response to hedgehog (Reply #24)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:09 PM

28. I suspect this practice developed tens of thousands of years

ago, when humans had to labor much of the day to provide food and there was little or no indoor heating anyway.











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Response to hedgehog (Reply #24)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:16 PM

32. I'm thinking those babies stink

All that wrapping to go through to change the little tikes, so just leave them outside while mom catches lunch.

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Response to siligut (Reply #32)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 03:30 PM

57. Well, all that fresh air probably does

"blow the stink off 'em" as the saying goes.

Better than the hothouse flowers American kids are - never let outdoors in some families.




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Response to hedgehog (Reply #24)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:26 PM

36. Or before fireplaces and chimneys...

...when fires were lit on the floor and smoke escaped through a hole in the roof.

Smokey air is unhealthy.

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Response to hunter (Reply #36)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 01:03 PM

44. Hearths are for cooking, not for heating

The purpose of shelter is to keep you dry and out of the wind.

Heating is a matter of comfort, rather than health, in all but the coldest climates. Did Native Americans have insulated and heated buildings? Yet they were living in somewhat colder times than now.

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:02 PM

25. not a big deal

my son's elementary school makes the students go outside for recess (2X per day) every day. Unless it is below 0 F. Or there is a wind chill advisory issued.

0 C is not that cold - only 32 F.

But, I'm a Minnesotan of Swedish ancestry, so perhaps I'm biased.

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Response to MrsMatt (Reply #25)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 01:24 PM

52. I'm Brit/Norwegain

and I love cold and rainy weather - I think a lot of it is indeed ancestry

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:09 PM

27. Vitamin D is good for you. Most of us in the US are deficient

because of our "work inside" lifestyle. Best way to avoid cold and flu is vitamin D.

Interesting story about different norms. Thank you for sharing!

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:11 PM

29. I saw "sub-zero" and was thinking F

23F isn't all that cold. People are warm blooded.

0F and I'd agree with you.

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:14 PM

30. Sub Zero approves of this message

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Response to The Straight Story (Reply #30)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 01:31 PM

54. groan

Can we get an ANTI award here, or something?

Keyboard Cat?


I mean, that was putrid.






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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)


Response to year of the cat (Reply #31)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:36 PM

38. Welcome to DU.

Those things do have vents, but I've wondered about them too. I thought they were made for rain, but I see some parents use them on cold days.

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Response to surrealAmerican (Reply #38)


Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:52 PM

40. When I was a toddler

My Mom would let me take naps on the front porch in the winter - bundled up fit for Antartica. Dad said it wasn't any colder than his bedroom in childhood. I still like a cool bedroom and a little fresh air - once I'm in bed.

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 01:11 PM

47. Ah, the medicinal qualities of lutefisk!

(Or "lutfisk" in Sweden.) A diet containing one serving of Beech Nut Strained Lutefisk every day ensures good health for the little nippers! (I guess because you don't have time to get cold or sick while you're retching. )

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 01:19 PM

50. Most of our ancestors also slept in the cold as did Eskimos & Native Americans.

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 01:27 PM

53. Those Norsemen have Neandertal blood in their veins...

 

Ever seen the 13th warrior?



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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 01:57 PM

55. when I first saw he headline I was expecting wolf cubs or something

but as long as they are out of the wind, they will be fine.
grew up in MI and -20 with the wind chill was semi normal
that Canada clipper coming across Lake Michigan oh boy.

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 02:55 PM

56. Not this again...

this pops up every few years.

then it splitters into two camps: those who are appalled and those who it as good.

I'm going to add a third camp because this is the 3rd time I have seen this story come around: the Meh camp.

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 03:35 PM

58. These are the descendants of the Vikings

The cold probably doesn't bother them much.

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Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 04:03 PM

59. things are relative. babies tend to be warm little things. i am barefoot all year in WI for several

years. i do not like snow so much tho. your work up to colder + colder. good for the feet's blood circulation. and hands. no gloves on til maybe 10f.

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