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Wed Feb 20, 2013, 07:51 PM

Why, when someone dies, are they spoken of as a "body" or "corpse"?

It really bothers me. Why not just say the name of the person and let it be? Why dissociate the person from their body, by saying things like "A corpse was found" rather than "So-and-so was found dead" etc?

"The body of..." WTF? Why not just "Jane Doe" or whatever their name was.

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Reply Why, when someone dies, are they spoken of as a "body" or "corpse"? (Original post)
Duer 157099 Feb 2013 OP
Callmecrazy Feb 2013 #1
Katashi_itto Feb 2013 #15
defacto7 Feb 2013 #34
corneliamcgillicutty Feb 2013 #76
defacto7 Feb 2013 #88
Warpy Feb 2013 #2
markpkessinger Feb 2013 #6
midwest irish Feb 2013 #28
orleans Feb 2013 #38
midwest irish Feb 2013 #46
Sekhmets Daughter Feb 2013 #52
orleans Feb 2013 #64
midwest irish Feb 2013 #67
midnight Feb 2013 #83
midwest irish Feb 2013 #84
midnight Feb 2013 #87
rustydog Feb 2013 #53
Warpy Feb 2013 #54
rustydog Feb 2013 #58
CTyankee Feb 2013 #59
Spider Jerusalem Feb 2013 #3
Bad Thoughts Feb 2013 #41
Benton D Struckcheon Feb 2013 #4
newfie11 Feb 2013 #8
ChoppinBroccoli Feb 2013 #22
elleng Feb 2013 #5
gcomeau Feb 2013 #7
SoCalDem Feb 2013 #19
wickerwoman Feb 2013 #35
orleans Feb 2013 #39
gcomeau Feb 2013 #45
orleans Feb 2013 #55
gcomeau Feb 2013 #57
orleans Feb 2013 #63
gcomeau Feb 2013 #66
Duer 157099 Feb 2013 #69
Cleita Feb 2013 #9
REP Feb 2013 #10
Ruby the Liberal Feb 2013 #11
MineralMan Feb 2013 #12
Auntie Bush Feb 2013 #13
lonestarnot Feb 2013 #14
Honeycombe8 Feb 2013 #16
surrealAmerican Feb 2013 #17
Duer 157099 Feb 2013 #18
SoCalDem Feb 2013 #20
loudsue Feb 2013 #29
LeftInTX Feb 2013 #33
CTyankee Feb 2013 #62
Zephie Feb 2013 #21
Jennicut Feb 2013 #23
alarimer Feb 2013 #24
randome Feb 2013 #25
Taverner Feb 2013 #50
Recursion Feb 2013 #26
marshall Feb 2013 #27
Yo_Mama Feb 2013 #30
Vinnie From Indy Feb 2013 #31
RedCappedBandit Feb 2013 #32
applegrove Feb 2013 #36
MADem Feb 2013 #37
orleans Feb 2013 #40
LongTomH Feb 2013 #85
dipsydoodle Feb 2013 #42
NNN0LHI Feb 2013 #43
malaise Feb 2013 #44
Taverner Feb 2013 #49
malaise Feb 2013 #65
BigDemVoter Feb 2013 #47
Duer 157099 Feb 2013 #61
Taverner Feb 2013 #48
Paladin Feb 2013 #51
Dreamer Tatum Feb 2013 #56
Duer 157099 Feb 2013 #60
TheKentuckian Feb 2013 #68
year of the cat Feb 2013 #70
Duer 157099 Feb 2013 #71
year of the cat Feb 2013 #72
Duer 157099 Feb 2013 #73
year of the cat Feb 2013 #74
Duer 157099 Feb 2013 #78
year of the cat Feb 2013 #79
Duer 157099 Feb 2013 #80
year of the cat Feb 2013 #82
etherealtruth Feb 2013 #75
Hugabear Feb 2013 #77
Duer 157099 Feb 2013 #81
NYC Liberal Feb 2013 #86

Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 07:56 PM

1. I've thought about that myself...

Maybe it carries back to the Christian belief that the you are the soul and the body is only a vessel.

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Response to Callmecrazy (Reply #1)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 08:17 PM

15. I usually refer to them as "the stiff"

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Response to Katashi_itto (Reply #15)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 02:28 AM

34. When I was doing mountain rescue on the cascades we called them gumbys.

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Response to defacto7 (Reply #34)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 02:23 PM

76. mt. hood?

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Response to corneliamcgillicutty (Reply #76)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 11:37 PM

88. Rainier

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 07:56 PM

2. Maybe they don't want to raise false hopes or prematurely

identify the body of the wrong person.

I was a nurse and I've seen a lot of death. After death, the person is gone, even though some individual body cells can remain alive for hours. If you've ever seen it, you know what I'm talking about. All that's there is a shell, whether the person has floated up to a heaven with a harp or just out of existence on a tide of happy hormones. They're gone. All that's left is an inert thing that was once a person.

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Response to Warpy (Reply #2)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 08:05 PM

6. Thank you!

I was at the bedside of both of my parents when each of them died, and I do indeed know exactly what you are talking about.

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Response to Warpy (Reply #2)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 11:49 PM

28. My mother was a nurse

 

Last edited Thu Feb 21, 2013, 12:41 PM - Edit history (1)

and tagged plenty of toes (incuding the father of a very very very notable journalist). She had the same view about death. I suppose its different when you have been around it and see it every day.

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Response to midwest irish (Reply #28)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 04:19 AM

38. okay, you got 3 verys in there so spill the beans! who's the "notable journalist" n/t

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Response to orleans (Reply #38)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 12:37 PM

46. Id Rather not say

 

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Response to midwest irish (Reply #46)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 01:02 PM

52. Cute.

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Response to midwest irish (Reply #46)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 02:46 AM

64. that's okay--i didn't really care anyway. i was just teasing you. n/t

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Response to orleans (Reply #64)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 09:20 AM

67. Read my answer again.

 

You may find a clue.

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Response to midwest irish (Reply #67)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 02:50 PM

83. Good clue.. My mother and my Irish twin are nurses.... When my Irish twin was in nursing school

she told me she would never tag a toe, because none of her patients would die.... Bless her...

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Response to midnight (Reply #83)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 03:00 PM

84. Im sorry

 

but I just died laughing because you wrote 'irish twin.' Good stuff.

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Response to midwest irish (Reply #84)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 03:44 PM

87. It is good stuff... Right now my Irish twin and I are the same age.... We have lots of fun with this

until St. Patricks day eve when I become the older twin...

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Response to Warpy (Reply #2)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 01:45 PM

53. Bingo!

That is what our church wants us to believe, this is the vessel the soul used during it's "earthly visit" and now the vessel is no longer needed.
That is the shell, not the person you loved so dearly...

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Response to rustydog (Reply #53)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 01:58 PM

54. I'm an atheist.

I've just seen a lot of death.

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Response to Warpy (Reply #54)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 03:04 PM

58. I'm agnostic, seen a lot of dying people too

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Response to Warpy (Reply #2)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 03:07 PM

59. I realized that immediately when my mother died. I knew she was no longer there.

it wasn't her. I kissed her forehead and left. I couldn't have watched the collection of her body from the hospital bed to be taken to the funeral home.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 07:57 PM

3. Religion

the soul animating the flesh is what makes the person, supposedly. John Smith is not John Smith's body. (and if you disregard the idea of a "soul", the personality and individuality that our brains impart goes away at death, as well.)

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Response to Spider Jerusalem (Reply #3)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 07:18 AM

41. Philosophy, too

"I think, therefore I am." The cognitive process is identified with the self, the body less so.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 07:58 PM

4. The person is gone...

...the corpse isn't the person, it's just the container.
I remember when I looked at my dad right after he died, maybe a minute after, and I just burst out "That's not my dad!"
It wasn't. It was just what carried him around. My dad, he was gone.

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Response to Benton D Struckcheon (Reply #4)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 08:08 PM

8. Same here when my dad died. Nt

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Response to Benton D Struckcheon (Reply #4)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 11:04 PM

22. I've Noticed That Whenever I've Gone To An Open Casket Funeral

The body in the open casket never looks like the person I knew when they were alive. I'm not a religious person (well, to be honest, I have certain religious beliefs, but I have a healthy disdain for all forms of organized religion), but something is definitely different after the person is dead.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 08:03 PM

5. Good question. And,

my Dad and Mom still ARE; I don't say they 'were.'

Visiting their resting place shortly.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 08:05 PM

7. Pretty obvious...

Why dissociate the person from their body, by saying things like "A corpse was found" rather than "So-and-so was found dead" etc?


Because that former is accurate and the latter is not. The person no longer exists. The body does.

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Response to gcomeau (Reply #7)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 08:46 PM

19. And, many times the "news" of the deceased person gets out before

the family & friends are notified.

From a police/medical perspective, they are dealing with a body/corpse/remains, not a "person"..

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Response to SoCalDem (Reply #19)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 02:38 AM

35. +1

They may not know who it is for some time after finding the corpse/body and even if they do, it may not be sensitive to release that information.

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Response to gcomeau (Reply #7)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 04:33 AM

39. but that's not accurate either

the person most certainly does still exist
in the hearts and minds of those who loved them or cared about them
and their body was part of who they are

i think stating "a corpse was found" is an extremely cold way to phrase it
clinical
lacking warmth or compassion
harsh
unsympathetic to the bereaved

you wouldn't say to a grieving parent "where did the police find your son's corpse?"

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Response to orleans (Reply #39)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 10:03 AM

45. No

Their memory exists. Their legacy exists. *They* do not. Don't confuse flowery poetic language with reality please.

(And even if that statement had been accurate, unless the cops had found the hearts and minds of the deceased loved ones it wouldn't have altered the accuracy of their statement would it?)

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Response to gcomeau (Reply #45)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 02:49 PM

55. "*They* do not" is your opinion based on your assumptions & what you've been told

because it wasn't my aunt's "memory" or "legacy" that showed up a year after she passed, looking as solid and as normal as she had before, talking to me and giving me quite a scare one afternoon.

but i do agree that "their memory exists" because she knew who i was and called me by my name. so she definitely remembered me.

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Response to orleans (Reply #55)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 03:02 PM

57. Hallucinations are nothing to take lightly.

I suggest you see someone about that. Sincerely.

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Response to gcomeau (Reply #57)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 02:45 AM

63. don't be a jerk by implying i don't know what hallucinations are. open your mind (it'll do you good)

although i admit i also tend to be of the "if i can't see it then it doesn't exist" school of thought
meaning that if it hadn't happened to me i'd find it very hard to believe as well.

and in spite of what i was fortunate enough to see i still had the attitude of "when you're dead, you're dead" for years even though i had this incredible experience.

and as you suggest, i did see someone about it. i ran upstairs to my mom and grandmother, hysterical, and told them what had happened. and by doing that my aunt accomplished what she intended--letting them know we don't die.

i believe this is what is referred to as a visitation and most people, while open to this experience as children, tend to outgrow it by the time they are around nine or ten. i was about six years old.

maybe if you did a little reading on the subject you'd understand it a little more. just because you've never come across something in your own life doesn't mean it doesn't exist.

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Response to orleans (Reply #63)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 07:53 AM

66. I'm not being a jerk. That wasn't a joke.

And I wasn't implying anything I was stating it straight out.

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Response to orleans (Reply #63)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:25 PM

69. Cool story

thanks for sharing it

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 08:09 PM

9. That's the regular term used by coroners and law enforcement. n/t

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 08:09 PM

10. Distance

For some people, it's easier to think of what's lying in the coffin or contained in the crematorium container as not a person they knew and loved, but as a corpse or body.

No matter how old you are, or intellectually comfortable with the idea of death, or even if you've seen it a number of times, it can be disjointing to see someone you know dead.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 08:10 PM

11. Pending notification of family?

I know I for one don't want to hear my mom's name on the news as "XYZ found dead" without having a heads up about it.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 08:13 PM

12. Why not?

Body and corpse are essentially the same word. The person who inhabited either ha departed. The body is just a body. Meat, if you prefer.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 08:15 PM

13. That's always bothered me too. I remember

after JFK was killed they referred him as the body. It was bad enough losing him and watching his funeral...but to have the media refer to him as the body was distressing.
I never could have thought of my husband or son as a body. Does anyone refer to those 20 slain children as 20 bodies? No, we respect them and still refer to them as children.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 08:17 PM

14. I dunno, what if they're a skeleton?

"Skeleton of we don't know was found..."

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 08:19 PM

16. It makes sense to me. A corpse/body is different from "Jane Smith." Jane's essence is no longer ther

A body is treated differently from "Jane Smith."

I've heard it referred to as "Jane Smith's body," but usually they aren't certain who it is when they find a "body." It also helps to avoid using the term "deceased person."

It's used in the industry, I suppose.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 08:28 PM

17. Even without the religious baggage on this question ...

... so much of what we think of as a specific person is based on their behavior, that, once that behavior is gone, they no longer resemble who they were.


A pile of bones is not really Richard III, even though it's all that's left of him.

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Response to surrealAmerican (Reply #17)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 08:32 PM

18. Nope, not buying it, nor any of the many other attempts

If someone is in a coma, or paralized and in a coma, such that they have absolutely NO behavior whatsoever, we still call them by their name.

I think it shows tremendous disrespect to stop speaking about somebody as a person when they die, as though their body is some kind of thing to be feared and dissociated from who the person was.

I feel strongly about this, even though I understand what everyone up thread is saying and what they mean. I just disagree with it.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Reply #18)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 08:48 PM

20. Comatose people are still alive..they exist as a living person even if they cannot

communicate.. Once they have died, they are no longer a person..their body remains, but "they" are truly gone.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Reply #18)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 11:49 PM

29. Many many many people in a coma wake up. They aren't a body.

They are still in there. And when they wake up, a lot of the time they remember people who came and sat and spoke with them.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Reply #18)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 12:24 AM

33. In a coma, you have perfusion of tissues. It's very visible.

Perfusion of tissue can occur even if you are brain dead.
Once the heart stops all of that stops.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Reply #18)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 03:24 PM

62. when she died my mother was no longer in the physical body. She entered another realm

She was in my heart and my memory. And I came to know what Joe Biden said about
losing a beloved person that there comes a time that their memory brings a smile to your lips before it brings a tear to your eye.

That is the way it should be, IMO. That way you go on, not just crumble, eventually, to dust.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 10:06 PM

21. Philosophically, because that which made them a person is gone.

The things that made them a person, such as memories, thoughts, emotions... These are all things that a dead body has no access to. Being no longer living, they are not a "person" anymore. They have become something else, which is a corpse. It does not devalue who they were in life, just acknowledges that the person who they were is no longer in that vessel of skin and bone.

That's just my opinion though.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 11:19 PM

23. Maybe part of it is that in our culture

we have somewhat of a fear of death. If that is just a body over there then it has less impact then Jane Smith is over there dead.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 11:35 PM

24. Because that's what it is.

Why should we sugarcoat anything?

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 11:40 PM

25. Because when someone dies, it's the same as if they never existed.

How's that for tough love?

You might say the people who knew him/her somehow means they aren't truly gone but those people will soon be gone, too.

In a million years, do you think anyone will know who Beethoven was?

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Response to randome (Reply #25)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 01:00 PM

50. +1000

 

Cold and hard, but reality nonetheless

Thanks

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 11:42 PM

26. In the military we said "remains"

I don't think the corpse "is" the person, so I get why that usage is what it is.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 11:43 PM

27. Same reason a fetus is not a baby

We have specific cultural beliefs for what constitutes a person.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 11:59 PM

30. Because a person is alive and dead flesh is not

No one who has ever been around a corpse doesn't recognize that. It's not the person. It's what is materially left of the person.

We do disassociate our "selves" from our bodies. If you lost a hand due to accidental amputation, you wouldn't think that you were permanently separated from a piece of yourself. You would experience it as a loss - of a limb, of function, not as a division.

The whole concept of brain death recognizes that the flesh is not the person. One may be living, but not "there" as a person. So don't blame this on religion. Science thinks the same.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 12:03 AM

31. Because "kangaroo" and "turnip" were already taken!

Cheers!

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 12:21 AM

32. Dust to dust

Rotting remains are no more a person than the ice cream your mother ate while you were being manufactured.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 02:51 AM

36. They also call people 'souls' if they are lost at sea.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 04:14 AM

37. Because their energy, the thing that made them them, is gone.

All that is left is the husk, the shell.

We are more than the sum of our parts, and the bit that could be called "more" is the person, the rest is just the parts (the corpse).

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 04:48 AM

40. i absolutely get what you're saying

and i feel the same way
(see my post #39)

example
it may be a "corpse" to some people
but to me that was my mother
those were the arms that held me and comforted me
those were the lips that smiled every day
those were the hands that pushed back my hair or opened a door for me
all a part of what made her her
all a part of how i had come to know her, see her,
and everything about her is precious to me
from her outwardly appearance
to her sharp mind
to her quick wit
to the bobby pins on her dresser

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Response to orleans (Reply #40)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 03:02 PM

85. The undertakers in my home town were always careful to refer to the deceased as 'Mr.' or 'Mrs.'

For a viewing: "There's someone here to see Mrs. Childress." (My grandmother) The sensitivity was appreciated.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 07:22 AM

42. Custom and practice.

.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 07:34 AM

43. Latin

Corpus Christi ("body of Christ")

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 07:47 AM

44. I agree with you

It's still the same person - only dead.

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Response to malaise (Reply #44)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 12:59 PM

49. Question: 100 years later, is the dirt that's leftover from the corpse a person?

 

At what point does the corpse change from person to dirt?

I'm not trying to be difficult, but just trying to show why this detachment is needed

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Response to Taverner (Reply #49)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 02:54 AM

65. As long as people still visit that dirt I guess so

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 12:56 PM

47. Interesting Question. . . .

I'm an RN, and we frequently have patients who expire. It's really quite striking the first time you have to clean up a dead body. What really hits you is that whatever person who was inhabiting the body is no longer there, leaving just an empty shell, hence, just a body.

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Response to BigDemVoter (Reply #47)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 03:09 PM

61. Can you tell the difference between a person who "temporarily" dies

and is resuscitated, a BHC, and a permanently dead person? I mean, not over hours, but over a few minutes. You can tell the difference? If so, you should write a paper about it because I'm sure the medical community would love to know about it.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 12:58 PM

48. To maintain objectivity

 

When handing a corpse, the goal is not to celebrate a fallen human's life, but to find out why they died, how and when

If you call the corpse "Billy Smith" it adds emotion - you need detachment when performing an autopsy

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 01:01 PM

51. I Hope That Question Isn't Making You Lose Any Sleep. (nt)

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 02:50 PM

56. Because the whole world is conspiring to make you religious

that's really what you're trying to say.

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Response to Dreamer Tatum (Reply #56)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 03:07 PM

60. No, as a matter of fact, that is not what I'm trying to say

I said what I'm trying to say. No more, no less.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 09:57 AM

68. Because luminous beings are we, not this crude matter.

You could make a perfect clone of a loved one, full of life, and it would not be the same person but rather a new one in familiar flesh.

Identical twins are distinct beings despite every possible similarity. The being is more than the body.

How would you wrap your mind around the possibility of transferring one's mind to a different container be it a mechanical or a biological construction.
Will you lament a corpse when it's former owner is still there clothed in a new form with every bit of their personality, memories, whit, hopes, and dreams?

We are more than a collection of parts and more to being alive the working order of those parts.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)


Response to year of the cat (Reply #70)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 12:42 PM

71. Immediately after? Yes, absolutely.

And I've been there, so it isn't hypothetical for me.

I didn't mean to make this a philosophical discussion about the soul and the duality of being.

My intent was that it strikes me as utterly disrespectful to one minute call that piece of flesh by name, and then the next, to call it a corpse. Even if the lifeforce has left it.

I also think this dissociation we do makes dead bodies so creepy to us. I don't mean a decomposing body, but a recently dead person, it's like we are suddenly afraid of that which we used to hug and enjoy being with. Now they are something to be feared and avoided, to be covered up and taken away with haste.

I'm not saying I like being around dead bodies LOL... gosh I hope that isn't how this is sounding. I'm just wondering aloud why it is this way for us, and whether it is healthy or what. That's all.

It all started when I read a book called "The Undead", where the author discusses at length the whole field of organ donation, and so-called "beating-heart cadavers", and the fine line between life and death and how that line is drawn.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Reply #71)


Response to year of the cat (Reply #72)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 02:14 PM

73. As I said, immediately after

Not at a funeral or wake. Not an embalmed body.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Reply #73)


Response to year of the cat (Reply #74)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 02:26 PM

78. I agree. And at that point

I *do* consider it a body, a corpse.

I must not be able to get my point across well. Oh well.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Reply #78)


Response to year of the cat (Reply #79)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 02:29 PM

80. Well, like in a hospital bed?

Just taken off of life support, that sort of thing. Hard to imagine?

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Response to Duer 157099 (Reply #80)


Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 02:19 PM

75. I have no issue with the "body/corpse" thing

My issue is with the euphemisms for death.

(I guess we all have little peeves about the use of language)

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 02:23 PM

77. What if you don't know the identity, or next-of-kin hasn't been notified yet?

Many times when the body of a deceased person is found, the identity is not yet known, or the next-of-kin may not have yet been notified.

In these cases, how else should this be reported?

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Response to Hugabear (Reply #77)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 02:30 PM

81. Yeah, that is totally not what I'm talking about

so I understand the use in that context.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 03:31 PM

86. Because it is a body?

"Jane Doe" was not found; her body was.

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