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Sat Feb 16, 2013, 02:46 PM

Best Footage Of Russian Meteor Strike I've Found So Far !!!





And from the San Francisco Chronicle:

The largest recorded meteor strike in more than a century entered the Earth's atmosphere about 9:20 a.m. local time at a hypersonic speed of at least 33,000 mph and shattered into pieces about 18 to 32 miles high, the Russian Academy of Sciences said. NASA estimated its speed at about 40,000 mph and said it exploded about 12 to 15 miles high, released 300 to 500 kilotons of energy and left a trail 300 miles long.

"There was panic. People had no idea what was happening," said Sergey Hametov of Chelyabinsk, about 930 miles east of Moscow in the Ural Mountains.

"We saw a big burst of light, then went outside to see what it was, and we heard a really loud, thundering sound," he said by telephone.

The shock wave blew in an estimated 1 million square feet of glass, according to city officials, who said 3,000 buildings in Chelyabinsk were damaged. At a zinc factory, part of the roof collapsed.

The Interior Ministry said about 1,100 people sought medical care after the shock wave and 48 were hospitalized. Most of the injuries were caused by flying glass, officials said.


Link: http://www.sfgate.com/world/article/Window-shattering-meteor-bursts-in-Russia-4283668.php

And...


Authorities believe an estimated 7,000-ton meteor that created a panic in Chelyabinsk, Russia, crashed into nearby Chebarkul Lake and produced this circular hole. Photo: Associated Press


22 replies, 3817 views

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Arrow 22 replies Author Time Post
Reply Best Footage Of Russian Meteor Strike I've Found So Far !!! (Original post)
WillyT Feb 2013 OP
jsr Feb 2013 #1
customerserviceguy Feb 2013 #3
TheMadMonk Feb 2013 #12
Ikonoklast Feb 2013 #13
eppur_se_muova Feb 2013 #16
Posteritatis Feb 2013 #22
Duer 157099 Feb 2013 #2
Leslie Valley Feb 2013 #4
Politicalboi Feb 2013 #5
napkinz Feb 2013 #6
loudsue Feb 2013 #7
eallen Feb 2013 #8
Jerry442 Feb 2013 #9
AverageMe Feb 2013 #11
Rosa Luxemburg Feb 2013 #10
underpants Feb 2013 #14
1monster Feb 2013 #15
WillyT Feb 2013 #17
Logical Feb 2013 #18
countryjake Feb 2013 #20
TheMightyFavog Feb 2013 #21
donheld Feb 2013 #19

Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 02:48 PM

1. Lucky it fell in a lake

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Response to jsr (Reply #1)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 02:55 PM

3. I'm thinking that icy lake would have cooled it down pretty quickly

I would imagine there are plans in the spring to try to look for it. It might teach us something about meteorites, since I would suppose that most are found cooled down slowly, and may have had a chance to rearrange themselves, chemically speaking.

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Response to customerserviceguy (Reply #3)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 05:21 PM

12. Care to guess where most meteorites are found?

 

It's white. It's cold. It doesn't have polar bears.

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Response to TheMadMonk (Reply #12)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 05:35 PM

13. In my refrigerator?

Wow, I'm going to go look now!

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Response to TheMadMonk (Reply #12)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 06:23 PM

16. Greenlandic and Antarctic ice is to meteorites as amber is to insects.

It can collect meteorites for thousands of years, then a change in weather or climate erodes the ice and suddenly there are meteors lying all about.

Next best: sandy deserts, which bury fresh falls only to reveal them years, even centuries, later.

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Response to customerserviceguy (Reply #3)

Sun Feb 17, 2013, 02:05 AM

22. They're actually somewhere between "cool" and "really cold" on impact generally

They spend five billion years at -270 degrees and only about ten to thirty seconds at high temperatures in the atmosphere; during a lot of that the outer layers are rapidly ablating off and the rock is cushioned somewhat by the air (which is what's really heating up on the way down). After it gets out of the "Hi, I'm a fireball" stage it's "only" moving a few times the speed of sound usually in the last few seconds before hitting the ground. There's very little opportunity for the meteorite to actually heat up in all of that; when they come to a stop they're usually warming up to ambient, not cooling down to it.

There was actually someone who got directly tagged by one a few decades back, being lucky enough that the atmosphere (and the top two floors of her house) slowed it down a great deal. She was badly bruised - think "beaned with a baseball made of iron" - but not burned.

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 02:51 PM

2. While it's cool that it happened during daylight

I can't help but wonder how that would've looked if it happened at night! Talk about

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 02:57 PM

4. What's truly amazing is that at the impact site they found

 

an infant wrapped in red and blue blankets.

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Response to Leslie Valley (Reply #4)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 03:01 PM

5. LOL!

Clark Kent. I thought about that a few days ago.

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 03:21 PM

6. thanks for posting!





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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 03:36 PM

7. Russia doesn't have any lines on the roads.

That's scary.

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 03:42 PM

8. I can't help but wonder, if that had happened in the 1960s...

Would it have started WW III?


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Response to eallen (Reply #8)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 05:09 PM

9. Yeah, like, at the height of the Cuban Missile Crisis! n/t

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Response to eallen (Reply #8)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 05:15 PM

11. 1962, to be precise, it would be the end of the world as we know it

 

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 05:10 PM

10. Wow! thanks!

Thank goodness it didn't land on the town itself.

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 05:49 PM

14. Great stuff

thanks

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 06:13 PM

15. Meteor or Meteorite? If you say so, but here is a high speed stop action photo of what

really happened!

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 11:18 PM

17. Kick !!!

:kick:

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sun Feb 17, 2013, 12:10 AM

18. I assume they will try to find it in the lake. n-t

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Response to Logical (Reply #18)

Sun Feb 17, 2013, 01:24 AM

20. They're now saying the lake wasn't an impact site...

http://rt.com/news/russia-meteor-meteorite-asteroid-chelyabinsk-291/

18:40 GMT: The search for the meteorite parts at Chebarkul Lake and at other two locations has officially been stopped. The huge ice hole found at the lake on Friday “has formed because of a different reason,” the Vice-Governor of Chelyabinsk region Igor Murog told Interfax-Ural.

And here:

07:58 GMT: No meteorite fragments were found at the bottom of Chebarkul Lake, says the Emergencies Ministry. A lack of underwater visibility, as well as a thick – up to 1.5 meters – layer of ooze were cited as the main reasons for failure. Six divers spent three hours searching for solid objects in the mud but finally gave up. Water samples taken from the lake have also shown nothing unusual.

I'm not sure what that Vice-Governor meant, but it sounds like the divers just gave up.

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Response to countryjake (Reply #20)

Sun Feb 17, 2013, 01:58 AM

21. Aren't most meteorites ferromagnetic?

Simple solution: magnetic anomaly detector.

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sun Feb 17, 2013, 01:20 AM

19. I can't get enough

this is one of the most fascinating events to happen in a long time.

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