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Fri Feb 15, 2013, 03:55 AM

Free College Courses Online!

Picked up information on this last week during the visit by Al Gore to St. Louis County Library and thought it might be worth passing along for those who might find it of interest.

https://www.coursera.org/

Might be worth a look.

65 replies, 4377 views

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Arrow 65 replies Author Time Post
Reply Free College Courses Online! (Original post)
Sherman A1 Feb 2013 OP
renate Feb 2013 #1
RedCappedBandit Feb 2013 #2
Le Taz Hot Feb 2013 #3
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #4
Sherman A1 Feb 2013 #5
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #6
JI7 Feb 2013 #20
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #27
Live and Learn Feb 2013 #15
SwissTony Feb 2013 #7
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #8
JI7 Feb 2013 #13
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #17
Bernardo de La Paz Feb 2013 #14
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #16
Bernardo de La Paz Feb 2013 #21
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #24
Bernardo de La Paz Feb 2013 #39
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #46
Bernardo de La Paz Feb 2013 #47
rhett o rick Feb 2013 #53
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #61
Sherman A1 Feb 2013 #10
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #18
TalkingDog Feb 2013 #36
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #37
Sherman A1 Feb 2013 #49
JI7 Feb 2013 #12
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #19
JI7 Feb 2013 #22
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #25
EastKYLiberal Feb 2013 #23
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #26
a la izquierda Feb 2013 #29
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #30
a la izquierda Feb 2013 #32
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #38
a la izquierda Feb 2013 #40
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #41
a la izquierda Feb 2013 #44
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #45
Mojorabbit Feb 2013 #43
a la izquierda Feb 2013 #28
Bernardo de La Paz Feb 2013 #48
lumberjack_jeff Feb 2013 #54
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #59
Recursion Feb 2013 #56
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #60
Bolo Boffin Feb 2013 #9
JI7 Feb 2013 #52
Bolo Boffin Feb 2013 #63
Jim__ Feb 2013 #11
AsahinaKimi Feb 2013 #31
Ghost in the Machine Feb 2013 #35
Recursion Feb 2013 #57
ZRT2209 Feb 2013 #33
Ghost in the Machine Feb 2013 #34
Mojorabbit Feb 2013 #42
JI7 Feb 2013 #50
Blue_Tires Feb 2013 #51
Recursion Feb 2013 #55
lumberjack_jeff Feb 2013 #58
nadinbrzezinski Feb 2013 #62
sfpcjock Feb 2013 #64
user_name Feb 2013 #65

Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 03:59 AM

1. Thank you!!!!

I just signed up for a course that's taught by a guy whose books I've bought in the past. TOTALLY EXCITED! Thank you!

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 04:05 AM

2. Wow, this is very interesting. Thanks.

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 04:07 AM

3. K & R

Last edited Fri Feb 15, 2013, 04:55 AM - Edit history (1)

Great list of courses! Went to the site and bookmarked. Thanks for posting this.

ETA: Just signed up for the "Know Thyself" course from the University of Virginia. I can't even tell you how hard it was to pick just one.

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 04:08 AM

4. 'non-credit' another salvo in the war to destroy public universities....

 

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #4)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 04:16 AM

5. While I understand your point of view

not everyone is looking for credit courses. I know for one that I certainly would not be at my age and may just want to pick up information on topics to be better informed. I believe there to be room for both in this world. I find iTunes U, Podcasts, YouTube and the Pritzker Military Library to be excellent sources of enjoyable and informational lectures.

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Response to Sherman A1 (Reply #5)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 04:21 AM

6. that's not what this is about, though. these courses *will* be offered for credit, and it looks

 

like the initial target is community colleges.

The five courses approved for college credit recommendation include four undergraduate credit courses:

Pre-Calculus from the University of California, Irvine
Introduction to Genetics and Evolution from Duke University
Bioelectricity: A Quantitative Approach from Duke University
Calculus: Single Variable from the University of Pennsylvania

And one course approved for developmental math vocational credit recommendation:

Algebra from the University of California, Irvine

Over the next months we will work to receive ACE CREDIT recommendations for additional courses.

You can earn an ACE CREDIT college credit recommendation by signing up for an eligible course in the Signature Track and then taking an online proctored Credit Exam at the end of the course. We are working with a third-party provider, ProctorU, to enable online proctoring so that students anywhere in the world can take these special proctored assessments via a webcam at their convenience. There is an additional fee for the Credit Exam.

http://blog.coursera.org/post/42486198362/five-courses-receive-college-credit-recommendations


It has always been possible to learn things on one's own by reading, sitting in at local colleges, etc. This is not about that, even though that's the opening wedge.

Make no mistake; it's more education deform, and it's targeted at public colleges and universities.

It will end with information becoming more privatized than ever. These are loss leaders, and will be removed once the goal is achieved, just like walmart raises prices after it kills off the local competition.

With the decline of hard-copy publishing & the attack on public institutions we are headed for a perfect storm of information monopoly.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #6)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:36 AM

20. i'm not sure i understand what you are saying

are you saying that community colleges and other public universities will stop offering these classes because students can take them for free and get credit ?

and once these classes stop being offered at public schools these free courses will stop being offered also and force students to pay for private classes ?

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Response to JI7 (Reply #20)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:58 AM

27. No, I am saying that these classes are going to be offered for credit at a price, and that colleges

 

and universities will be pressured by supposed 'financial crisis' to accept the credits.

Which will mean they will further cut back on physical course offerings and staff. Which will mean futher layoffs in the education sector and the shutdown of colleges and universities in the public sector in particular.

I posted a link which you apparently didn't read.

The new industry of large-scale online education will garner an important measure of academic respectability Thursday when the American Council on Education announces that four courses of the Mountain View, Calif.-based Coursera organization are worthy of college credit — if anti-cheating measures are enforced.

It is now up to colleges and universities to decide whether to allow their students to replace traditional courses taught in classrooms with low-cost online courses that enroll many thousands of students worldwide and involve little direct interaction with instructors. (but of course it isn't 'up to' colleges and universities, it's up to their funders and their complicit administrators)

Dean Florez, a former California state senator who is president of the Twenty Million Minds Foundation, an organization that seeks to widen access to online learning, described the move as a huge step in national higher education. He said he hoped that it will encourage state colleges and universities in California and elsewhere to move more quickly into online education, especially for entry-level courses that are now so overcrowded that students have trouble enrolling in them, delaying graduation. (of course, they're overcrowded because funding has already been cut for actual teaching, but when has truth-telling ever been a neoliberal priority?)

It is usually free to take a course through Coursera and other similar groups, including Udacity and edX. However, Coursera charges students $30 to $99 for a completion certificate for a class taken under surveillance monitoring that includes individualistic typing patterns to prove a student's identity. For an additional $60 to $90, a student will be eligible for the ACE credit by taking final exams proctored through webcams. A portion of those fees will go to schools such as UC Irvine that created the classes.

http://articles.latimes.com/2013/feb/07/local/la-me-0207-online-credit-20130207

another step toward the universal surveillance state, with big brother in your living room as well...

oh brave new world that has such neoliberal wonders in it

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Response to Sherman A1 (Reply #5)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:19 AM

15. +1 Knowledge should always be available and free.

It enhances us all.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #4)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 04:22 AM

7. Perhaps it just gives people who can't go to Stanford, Melbourne or London U

the chance to get some quality education. And it's free.

'Normal" students will still attend these institutions and earn their degrees.

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Response to SwissTony (Reply #7)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 04:25 AM

8. uh, yeah, that's what they say. but the capitalists play a long game, and the public is too naive

 

to get it.

those who aren't shilling, that is.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #8)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:02 AM

13. aren't these Free Classes ?

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Response to JI7 (Reply #13)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:29 AM

17. for the time being. but soon to become otherwise. a trojan horse for education deform is what it is,

 

ultimately.

as well as another step into the universal surveillance state.


The new industry of large-scale online education will garner an important measure of academic respectability Thursday when the American Council on Education announces that four courses of the Mountain View, Calif.-based Coursera organization are worthy of college credit — if anti-cheating measures are enforced.

It is now up to colleges and universities to decide whether to allow their students to replace traditional courses taught in classrooms with low-cost online courses that enroll many thousands of students worldwide and involve little direct interaction with instructors.

Dean Florez, a former California state senator who is president of the Twenty Million Minds Foundation, an organization that seeks to widen access to online learning, described the move as a huge step in national higher education. He said he hoped that it will encourage state colleges and universities in California and elsewhere to move more quickly into online education, especially for entry-level courses that are now so overcrowded that students have trouble enrolling in them, delaying graduation.

It is usually free to take a course through Coursera and other similar groups, including Udacity and edX. However, Coursera charges students $30 to $99 for a completion certificate for a class taken under surveillance monitoring that includes individualistic typing patterns to prove a student's identity. For an additional $60 to $90, a student will be eligible for the ACE credit by taking final exams proctored through webcams. A portion of those fees will go to schools such as UC Irvine that created the classes.

http://articles.latimes.com/2013/feb/07/local/la-me-0207-online-credit-20130207



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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #8)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:18 AM

14. You too can play long game. Educate yourself for free & that is worth more than any piece of paper

Learning is a life-long process.

You can't teach an old dog new tricks, so keep learning new tricks and you'll never be an old dog.

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Response to Bernardo de La Paz (Reply #14)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:23 AM

16. I have educated myself all my life, and I didn't need some loss leader from education deformers

 

to do so.

Your post is an exemplar of condescending and diversionary nonsense rolled into one.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #16)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:37 AM

21. Ah, you have chosen "angry".

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Response to Bernardo de La Paz (Reply #21)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:41 AM

24. to correctly identify your previous post, and this latest one, as both condscending and diversionary

 

demonstrates perspicaciousness, not anger.

I understand why you are driven to attack me on a personal basis quite well.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #24)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 07:56 AM

39. Not a personal attack. I was characterizing your post as "angry". No need to be so defensive.

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Response to Bernardo de La Paz (Reply #39)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 10:51 AM

46. i'm not defensive at all. you wrote "ah, *you* have chosen angry." your words.

 

you have repeatedly made personal remarks about me, choosing to analyse me rather than the topic at hand. that's a fact.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #46)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 11:12 AM

47. You can't win, or rather, one can't win or maybe I can't win. When I wrote "you"

When I wrote "you", {on edit - in my first post in this thread} I was writing generally, in the plural, really meaning us the body politic, we the people. Your post that I was responding to spoke of generic groups like "capitalists" and even included the word or phrase "the public", but you forgot that.

At other times, when I have thought there might be some confusion, I have written something like "one can" or "a person can", but then people complain that the language is stiff and awkward.

So I can't win. Whether I write "you" or "one" or "a person", someone will object.

In this case, you chose to interpret the "you" as being personal. It was not. If you want an apology, you can have it. I apologize for not writing more clearly in a way that you couldn't misinterpret.

Most people, even if they had thought I was advising them personally, would accept the advice, especially if they have been actively learning all their lives. Even if they thought it necessary to explain that, they would not derail their own thread to start a fight over a non-existent but perceived slight.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #8)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 08:17 PM

53. So you would tell a hungry begger to not take the sandwich because he would

become dependent on hand-outs?

I do not believe that these free courses will detract at all from the income of universities. And they give a great opportunity to those that never would have a chance to go to a university or are retired and just want the knowledge.

A bird in the hand is worth 10 in the "long game".

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Response to rhett o rick (Reply #53)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 11:21 PM

61. the hungry beggar being -- what? people who want to take free online courses? yeah, that's

 

such a great analogy.

online education deform classes aren't the only means of self-education that currently exists.

but they are going to kill lots of the presently existing means.

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Response to SwissTony (Reply #7)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 04:56 AM

10. I agree

with you that students interested in a degree program will certainly attend these institutions and go through the process required to complete their degree programs however, there appears to be other points of view. I don't see this as a slippery slope to privatize education (which will certainly be changing over the next few years and decades as technology does) rather I see it as a democratization of education and information. I don't think that even these organizations who supposedly will attempt to capitalize on the alleged demise of the state or local schools will be able to keep the genie of information in the bottle.

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Response to Sherman A1 (Reply #10)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:30 AM

18. you may not see it that way, but that's what it is.

 

http://articles.latimes.com/2013/feb/07/local/la-me-0207-online-credit-20130207

democratization of information has nothing to do with it, though that's how it's being sold. but the end game will be quite different.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #18)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 07:25 AM

36. "but the end game will be quite different" I'm from Missouri.

Show me.

Show me prior examples of higher educational systems being privatized after the courses are offered cheap to free by a 3rd party. (say... for example, your average public library)

Otherwise, you are simply stomping around in the creek with a big branch trying to assert your dominance in the hierarchy.

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Response to TalkingDog (Reply #36)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 07:27 AM

37. lol. another resort to personal attack. right out of the playbook.

 

i write for those with eyes to see, not the willfully blind.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #18)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 03:09 PM

49. Then we must agree to disagree

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #4)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:01 AM

12. so people shouldn't learn unless they go to a university ?

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Response to JI7 (Reply #12)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:35 AM

19. your post is ironic, considering you're pumping 'free' university classes.

 

people learn all the time without going to university. but these *are* university classes.

being offered not, contrary to the PR, as learning experiences, but as part of the ongoing attack on public services, unions, and public education.

http://articles.latimes.com/2013/feb/07/local/la-me-0207-online-credit-20130207

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #19)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:40 AM

22. but unless one is working towards a degree why does the credit part matter ?

i just don't see what difference it makes.

the people who are excited because it's free and just like to learn for their enjoyment will no longer take them if they have to pay later.

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Response to JI7 (Reply #22)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:44 AM

25. it wouldn't matter if this were actually some 'free' recordings of university lectures. but that's

 

not what it is. it's the beginning of another online education platform that will eventually be charged for.

http://articles.latimes.com/2013/feb/07/local/la-me-0207-online-credit-20130207

The targets are 'excess' public colleges and universities, as well as smaller private colleges, and their faculties.

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Response to JI7 (Reply #12)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:40 AM

23. How dare people get access to free college courses!

 

We might destroy the institution of the university where greedy professors require that you buy the newest edition of their textbook that they rush to churn out for each new round of suckers.

THAT'S NOT FAIR!!!

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Response to EastKYLiberal (Reply #23)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:47 AM

26. it's not the professors getting most of that cash, but the textbook corporations. the ones who

 

are pushing this online education crap. like pearson, for example.

professors don't set the prices for textbooks. and they get only a fraction of the price.

you really need to educate yourself, as you don't seem to understand how the world actually works.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #26)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 06:14 AM

29. Losing battle you're fighting here.

I'm 100% with you in this, but it's a losing game on DU. For whatever reason, people not associated with education don't quite get how it works. They also don't get(some, anyway) the correlation between these things and a long, slow attack on education.

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Response to a la izquierda (Reply #29)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 06:19 AM

30. Informing people is never a losing battle. Those who don't get it mainly don't wish to get it.

 

These are scary and exciting times to be an activist. Scary because the privatizing dehumanizing forces of neo-liberalism are wrecking havoc everywhere; from the climate, to endless wars, to health care, to outrageous income inequality, and, as readers of this blog know, to dismantling public education. The magnitude of this assault, its machine-like ability to crush all that lay in its way, and the fear and silence it provokes often leave me stunned and uncertain of where and how to act. But these are also exciting times, from Occupy Wall Street, to Wisconsin where workers joined in solidarity to demand their voices be heard and their rights protected; to Chicago where teachers were joined by students and parents in resisting the attack on their union and their schools; to teachers in Seattle, led by the teachers of Garfield High School, asserting their knowledge, their judgment, their dignity, and their moral righteousness to say no to MAP tests; to parents in New York, Chicago and Philadelphia joining to resist school closings: we can be a part of the movement to reclaim education and the possibility of the democratic project.

Still, we waiver between fear and courage. Many of us have found ourselves alone with our understanding that a terrible wrong is being done to public schools and universities. This loneliness deepened for me as I allowed myself to participate in the testing, accountability measures, and data collection processes that are the tools of our undoing. Even while I spoke in my courses about the dangers of these measures, even as I invited students to be critical of the accountability regime, even as I could wax eloquent over dinner about the undoing of public education by an ideology that makes a commodity of every person and idea, I went to work each day and dutifully completed the rubrics, aligned the standards, explained the best way to interface with the web-based data management system. Shame creeps in even as I write these words, as I reveal my compliance within this system. I recognize that same shame in the eyes of colleagues who remain silent when conversations turn to the madness that grips us, when ideas surface that perhaps we should take action and say no to the undoing of our commitments and responsibilities to teaching and learning for justice and liberation. I struggled mightily with my complicity, trying to carve out the spaces of resistance within my courses, within my conversations. But more and more I doubted the story I was telling myself. If, in the end, the actions that I took allowed the machine of technocracy to continue unabated, I was as responsible as the most complicit administrators and colleagues.

Like so many educators, I wrestled with and continue to try to make sense of the nature of activism within systems and institutions so dominated by fear. I once had a colleague say that I ‘frighten her’ because I was so vocal about my torment, about my sense that we could no longer agree over coffee that things were wrong, but then sit quietly in meetings and allow the destructive farce of accountability to continue. At first her fear of me confused me. Isn’t it the people in charge who frighten us, the ones who use surveillance, endless talk of budget cuts, and shock doctrine pressures to get us to conform? At some point her words became a clearer warning: speaking out is dangerous-whether or not it is followed immediately by action. There is a reason we protect free speech in our constitution, because the ability to name our world is the first act of rebellion. Just like Freire tells us.

In Liberty Plaza during Occupy Wall Street I saw a yellow poster board sign with the words scrawled by hand: ‘see something, say something.’ This simple flip of the fear mongering reminders we’d been inundated with since 9-11 helped me understand the power of bearing witness, of naming what was happening to us and refusing the narrative being imposed on us. Where was the danger? Who was trying to hurt us? And why were the people in charge so committed to silence?

I came to understand that every time I refused the words ‘accountability’ or ‘standards’ or ‘outcomes’ or the phrase ‘data driven,’ I was actively resisting the dominance of their language to describe my work. Each time I said, ‘Well why are we acting as if these numbers on this rubric reflect the development of our student teachers when we know they don’t?’ I was bearing witness to the absurdity of the measures, the data, the scientistic collection of numbers. I came to realize that it was my civic and moral duty that each time I saw the emotional violence of high stakes measurements, each time I saw the dehumanizing language of accountability, each I saw the marginalization of the voices of educators, parents and students in claiming the education we want, it was my job to say something. To raise concern. To heighten awareness. To alert others to the threat. And this naming of the reality of what was happening, this refusal to be silent in the face of what was being done to us as faculty, as educators, as human beings with a desire to make the meanings we wanted was, as my colleague wrote, frightening –to those in charge, and to those who preferred not to rouse the anger of those in charge.

Jesse Hagopian, one of the teachers involved in the Garfield boycott that has spread throughout Seattle and incited support across the country, says of the process by which the teachers came to decide to boycott “It started with a conversation in the teachers’ lounge.” It started with people seeing a test that was not working, that was hurting their students, that was twisting ideas of knowledge and learning; that simply did not work– and saying so—saying what they saw. And what they discovered was how many of them were seeing the same thing. So, when teachers, students, parents, community members ask, ‘what can I do?’ I say the first step is simple—scary yes—but simple—see something, say something.

http://atthechalkface.com/2013/01/31/see-something-something-organize/

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #30)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 06:51 AM

32. No, you're absolutely right.

And thanks for this post. It's just so frustrating sometimes to see teachers of any stripe maligned by those who should support our cause. I'm not against the democratization of education, as I think all people should have access to study what they want. But unfortunately, that requires a sea-change in the way education is funded in the US...something which I don't envision occurring anytime soon.

Thanks for that link.

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Response to a la izquierda (Reply #32)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 07:31 AM

38. do you think most people want a privatized education system? i don't.

 

To the "Beloved Community" of Education Activists

When you speak out as a matter of conscience on issues that are important to you, it is impossible to predict the consequences. You do so because you can't look at yourself in the mirror if you don't. When I began speaking out in behalf of teachers under attack four years ago, it is because I couldn't stand to see the great teachers I worked with the Bronx being made the unremitting target of abuse by politicians and the press. Little did I know that this would link me to a national community of education activists fighting the same policies all over the country.

Now, four years later, I have dozens of new friends in almost every state in the union who have, for me at least, recreated the "Beloved Community" that the southern Civil Rights Movement held up as a movement ideal in the early 60's. The courage these individuals display in fighting top down initiatives that destroy teaching and learning, sometimes with little support in their own communities, inspires me with feelings of solidarity and love and gives me the energy to fighting on.

To all of you, whether in Florida, South Carolina, Washington, Oregon, North Carolina, Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Colorado, Upstate New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Indiana, California, or the great city of Chicago, I owe a debt of gratitude for infusing my life with a new and higher sense of purpose. Please keep speaking truth to power and defend the right of all children to have an education that stirs their imaginations and builds on their strengths.

http://withabrooklynaccent.blogspot.com/2012/12/to-beloved-community-of-education.html

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #38)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 08:09 AM

40. No I don't think people want a privatized education system.

I'm a product of public education from Kindergarten through PhD. I teach in a private school now, but will be taking a tenure-track position at a public university. What I think is that Americans need to be more vested in public education, meaning willing to pay taxes for quality educational services. I come from a very conservative family, on my side and my husband's. It's astonishing how many have the attitude "as soon as our kids are done with school, we're moving" so they don't have to pay the higher taxes in their town...taxes which go to their kids' schools.
The loudest voices of protest in favor of public schools and teachers came from my professors, who would go to the capital and march on behalf of their brethren in elementary and high schools.
I think that if Americans want to keep up in a very intelligent world, they must be willing to fund public education on all levels. I had to mortgage my brain to afford college, to the tune of $100,000 in federal loans (now the property of Sallie Mae, which in and of itself is criminal).
Americans value education...but millions don't want to pony up for it.

I think we're on the same page.

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Response to a la izquierda (Reply #40)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 08:31 AM

41. but that didn't use to be the attitude. that attitude i attribute to two things; relentless

 

propaganda from the right about how wasteful, ineffective, and downright evil public education was and 2) 40 years of neoliberal economic policy, which has left people poorer and more insecure than they were in the 'golden age' of american capitalism circa 1940-1975.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #41)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 09:17 AM

44. Spot on.

It would be wild if we could change that trajectory.

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Response to a la izquierda (Reply #44)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 09:23 AM

45. i think the banksters, the lack of real recovery and the assault on things like social security

 

has put people in a more receptive mood.

truth will out; you can't hide the conditions of people's actually lived lives with propaganda.

so long as its just happening to some poor person over there, people can kid themselves; but imo, the oligarchs are overreaching.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #26)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 08:57 AM

43. I took a greek mythology class this year from them

and I did order a lot of books but none were textbooks. I got them on amazon at a fairly inexpensive price.

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Response to EastKYLiberal (Reply #23)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 06:02 AM

28. Oh get a clue.

Greedy college professors? You've no idea what the hell you're talking about.
Most profs don't force students to buy their textbooks...because most profs don't WRITE textbooks. Most profs won't ever be rich...we do what we do because we like teaching/researching.
Many PhDs are actually on food stamps. Here, try this on for size: http://chronicle.com/article/From-Graduate-School-to/131795/

States like Texas have oversight boards telling profs what they should/shouldn't teach. None of Perry's cronies are actual educators. So yes, there is a concerted effort to destroy public education.
But you go on. You tell me about my profession

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #4)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 11:13 AM

48. Nonsense. Free online college courses have been available for years. nt

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #4)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 08:51 PM

54. Much like Napster was a threat to record companies?

Education is valuable for it's own sake, I'm unsympathetic to those who profit from dispensing it.

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Response to lumberjack_jeff (Reply #54)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 11:17 PM

59. those who profit from it are the for-profit corporations pushing education deform.

 

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #4)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 08:53 PM

56. Yes, the medieval model of the university is an ox that will probably be gored in the next decades

But that's a very good thing.

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Response to Recursion (Reply #56)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 11:19 PM

60. don't kid yourself. the university will survive; there will just be fewer of them, and mostly

 

private.

and they will be much less accessible to the peons. kind of like how it was during the medieval period.

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 04:46 AM

9. I'm doing the Health for All course right now, along with a film course and intro to philosophy

I'm signed up for the Intro to Sustainability course and two others, Irrational Behavior and Ancient Greek History. It's a great way to learn stuff for free with no need to pursue a degree or credit.

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Response to Bolo Boffin (Reply #9)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 06:01 PM

52. where is the ancient greek history link ? do they have other history classes ?

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Response to JI7 (Reply #52)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 12:38 AM

63. Here's the link:

https://www.coursera.org/#course/ancientgreeks

And it looks like all the history courses, plus other stuff, are under the Humanities category:

https://www.coursera.org/#category/humanities

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:01 AM

11. Bookmarked. Thanks.

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 06:41 AM

31. Noticed they didn't offer languges

oh well. C'est la vie....

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Response to AsahinaKimi (Reply #31)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 07:23 AM

35. Check out post #34....

Peace,

Ghost

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Response to AsahinaKimi (Reply #31)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 08:55 PM

57. All of FSI's language courses are free online

That's what the State Department uses.

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 06:52 AM

33. also many many available free on iTunesU

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 07:13 AM

34. There is also the "Open Courseware Consortium", where you can take classes from MIT...

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, University of California, Irvine... University of Michigan, and many more...

http://www.ocwconsortium.org/en/aboutus


Peace,

Ghost


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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 08:54 AM

42. I took a greek mythology class there this past year. Great fun!

Highly recommend it!

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:36 PM

50. i wish they would include some literature and history classes

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 05:46 PM

51. kick

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 08:52 PM

55. MIT has had almost all of its courses online for free for years

Harvard is moving there too.

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 08:59 PM

58. That is awesome.

There are several I'd like to take... now just need to create the time to do it.

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 11:23 PM

62. Cool, thanks

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 06:19 AM

64. Thanks, K&R

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 07:49 AM

65. It's great!

My son is taking "Genetics and Evolution" right now, "How Things Work" in March, and "Planet Earth" and "Intro to Interactive Programming on Python" in the fall.

We've been really pleased with the quality of the lectures. We could opt to pay $100 for him to have a proctored exam so that he can be recommended for college transfer credit with the genetics class...

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