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Thu Feb 14, 2013, 05:27 AM

 

Education deform is a global initiative of the international corporate elite

If you think things like "No Child Left Behind," "Race to the top", charter schools, education vouchers, high-stakes testing, and teaching as a "MacJob" are purely American initiatives, you're mistaken. The same things are happening all over the world, and it's no accident.

The ultimate aim is to put education -- at all levels, from preschool to university, technical education and college-track -- in the hands of global private corporations, shares of which can be traded in financial markets.

And ultimately, these corporations will scoop up local tax monies (the level of which will no longer be a matter of local votes, but state-mandated) and local tuition monies (because if you want your kid to get something better than the basic 'public' education, soon to become 'welfare' education, you will have to pay extra -- and this is already happening). Control of school policy, community relations, hiring and firing -- will also be in the hands of corporate outsiders, not locals.

NCTQ = National Council on Teacher Quality, is a newer one of the 'reformy' education organizations funded by the usual billionaire suspects.

It masquerades as being dedicated to improving teaching, but perusing its website you can see it also loves cheap labor ("Putting COLA on a diet," "How Teacher Pension Systems Are Failing Both Teachers and Taxpayers," "A Closer Look at Teacher Leave Benefits in TR3 Districts") and hates traditional education training programs ("NCTQ Teacher Prep Review Right to Know Ad Campaign") -- mainly because it wants to take over certification (for profit, natch, with lots of expensive testing).

http://www.nctq.org/p/

Michael Johnston is a Colorado state senator, a Teach for America alumnus who founded a Bill-Gates-funded 'choice' school. His career path was very reformy: Yale (BA philosophy), TFA, a Master's from Harvard's Eli-Broad-funded Graduate School of Education Management, then the principalship with Gates, then the Senate (on an education platform).

A blogger writes:

I have researched and examined the associations and activities of 20 NCTQ advisory board members to date, and of that 20, Michael Johnston is the one who... is being groomed by “dark forces” to have – get this – a global reformer impact....Johnston is developing his international reformer tentacles...Johnston is a reform-minded legislator, and where there is a reform-minded legislator, you better believe ALEC is involved...

And don’t think for a minute that either ALEC or the corporate reform movement stops at the US border. ALEC has international reach, and Johnston has been selected to move forward as a part of the corporate reform international plan as is shown in his involvement with the Pahara-Aspen Educational Fellowship (Aspen Institute)....

Peter Reiling, Executive Vice President, Leadership and Seminar Programs at the Aspen Institute comments on its 2013 cohort: ”We also welcome this truly exceptional cohort of leaders into the Aspen Global Leadership Network, where they join a powerful global community of more than 1,500 other Fellows who are using their resources and talents to create change in their spheres of influence.”

“Billionaire’s billionaire” David Koch (as in worth 25 billion in April 2012, as in one of the Koch brothers, as in a driving force behind ALEC) is on the board of the Aspen Institute. So is former Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice, co-author (with Joel Klein) of the now-infamous national security report that, as Valerie Strauss of the Washington Post notes, “…seems to look at public schools as if they are the bad guys that need to be put out of business, with a new business taking over, funded with public dollars.”

http://deutsch29.wordpress.com/2013/02/05/nctq-letter-grades-and-the-reformer-agenda-part-x/


Now take a look at Pahara-Aspen. Here's the Education Fellowship Page:

http://www.aspeninstitute.org/leadership-programs/aspen-institute-newschools-fellowship-entre

And some of their other pages:

Central America Leadership Initiative:

The Central America Leadership Initiative (CALI) is a Non-Profit Organization that identifies and motivates effective and successful young leaders across Central America, who are capable of guiding their countries as they struggle to align the social and economic demands of the region with local visions of a "good society"...


Here's one of their projects:

Renata Villers is working on a "Scaleable Model for Teacher Professional Development", an extension of ADA...The program will work on critical success factors for future scale up, such as: training of trainers; evaluation; adaptation of the methodology to multi-grade schools, reduction of unit costs, etc. It is a trainer of trainers model.


Gee, that sounds so familiar....

Carlos Eduardo Borgonovo's project is to bring education to isolated coffee communities by implementing on-line distance learning community centers....where participants can access educational programs through computer technology and interact with tutors/teachers at the Tecnológico de Monterrey....The pilot project is based in Talnique - a community from which Carlos business employs many of its members to work in its mill and farms.(!!!!bringing education to his personal plantation!!!!)

Todos por la Educación de Honduras is a social movement that will mobilize a large sector of society, in order create the conditions needed to change the education system . Currently, the only voices in the education debate are the professor's union and lawmakers. Unions have become politicized and lawmakers tend to be swayed by the interest of the unions because of the power these represent...A third voice in the debate is needed....A group of entrepreneurs, NGOs, and other sectors of organized civil society will start a campaign to educate the public about important issues regarding education. An initial consensus phase will yield four to five key issues that will summarize the priorities. At first the issues will be voiced by opinion leaders, artists, athletes and intellectuals, and ultimately by all citizens. The project will mainly benefit the poor by giving them access to better education.

http://www.centralamericaleadership.net/project.php?c=5


Isn't that wonderful? Will mainly benefit the poor...just like education reform here was supposed to...

Here's one of the fellows from their Nigerian Initiative:

Bello’s most daring project to date is YoKwazi: an ambitious initiative aiming to change Africa’s education landscape by putting learning resources to the hands of students and teachers across the continent.

Still at testing stage, YoKwazi aims to deploy OTGPlaya, an offline wireless cloud device, in key community areas to house and host online educational tools. The device, which was incubated at the Wennovation Hub, will do a one-time download, store the content and make it available for people nearby to access it through their wi-fi enabled devices.

“It’s about bringing online education to an offline world,” says Bello.

On his legacy, Idris says his mission as an “Afropreneur” is to enable access to information so that people can tap into their own creativity to solve their problems without having to rely on government.

http://nli-global.org/nli-associate-idris-ayodeji-bello-talks-to-cnn-on-how-afropeneurs-will-shape-africas-future/



The Aspen Global Leadership Network

The Aspen Global Leadership Network (AGLN) is a unique network made up of highly successful entrepreneurial leaders. Because of their demonstrated leadership accomplishments and abilities, these Fellows are specially selected to be part of one of 13 Fellowships around the world including or modeled after the Aspen Institute’s flagship values based leadership program, the Henry Crown Fellowship. Fellows enter the program having demonstrated great deal of personal success and leave it inspired to make a greater mark on their community and the world; to move as we say, “from success to significance.”

The AGLN seeks to increase the impact and effectiveness of these leaders and support them over the long haul by connecting them in meaningful ways and encouraging them to learn, support and collaborate with each other. Today, the Aspen Global Leadership Network counts nearly 1,600 members from 45 countries and growing.

Programs Include:

Africa Leadership Initiative
Aspen Institute - NewSchools Fellowship: Entrepreneurial Leaders for Public Education
Aspen Institute-Rodel Fellowships in Public Leadership
Catto Fellowship Program
Central America Leadership Initiative
Henry Crown Fellowship Program
India Leadership Initiative
Liberty Fellowship Program
Middle East Leadership Initiative
Nigeria Leadership Initiative -- Senior Fellows Program

http://www.aspeninstitute.org/leadership-programs/about-agln



This is like the old missionary model, where the Catholic church or Protestant capitalist like JD Rockefeller would fund missionaries who'd go out & convert the locals, who would themselves be sent for missionary training at seminaries funded by the same capitalists and return to their home countries to convert others -- not only to Christianity, but also to western values and the capitalist ethic.

Global missionaries of neoliberalism, multiracial, multiethnic compradors.

Isn't it good to know that the big capitalists are planning everyone's future for us?

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Arrow 22 replies Author Time Post
Reply Education deform is a global initiative of the international corporate elite (Original post)
HiPointDem Feb 2013 OP
snot Feb 2013 #1
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #2
ReRe Feb 2013 #3
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #4
Bonobo Feb 2013 #5
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #8
Bonobo Feb 2013 #9
savebigbird Feb 2013 #11
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #13
LineLineLineLineLineNew Reply k
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #14
JCMach1 Feb 2013 #6
xchrom Feb 2013 #7
madrchsod Feb 2013 #10
OldDem2012 Feb 2013 #12
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #15
duffyduff Feb 2013 #18
duffyduff Feb 2013 #19
joshcryer Feb 2013 #20
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #16
LineNew Reply k
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #17
woo me with science Feb 2013 #21
woo me with science Feb 2013 #22

Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Thu Feb 14, 2013, 05:43 AM

1. The critical indicator for me is,

to what extent are their curriculae designed to develop critical thinking and creativity?

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Response to snot (Reply #1)

Thu Feb 14, 2013, 05:46 AM

2. lol

 

read about the guy who's bringing distance learning to the workers on his own goddamn slave plantations in latin america.

if the plan were to bring "critical thinking" it wouldn't be done by non-democratic, stealthy means.

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Thu Feb 14, 2013, 07:08 AM

3. Going Global with privitization of schools...

First, HiPointDem, you are a prolific internet researcher and I thank you from the bottom of my heart. It's really amazing when you start turning over the rocks, isn't it... what's under there crawling around?
Happy Valentine's Day!

Our lives are being socially engineered for a high price and nobody's telling the American People. That's the way I felt when Clinton asked all the President's up to DC to kick off the Free Trade deal back in 1993 (year?) It's like "You will do this and you can like it or lump it." Like our life is not our own. Being manipulated like little pawns on a game board. Hell, they need to be paying us!

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Response to ReRe (Reply #3)

Thu Feb 14, 2013, 07:09 AM

4. Our lives are being socially engineered = yes. re-engineered in this era, to suit the rich. it's

 

their plantation, we just work on it.

and in the case of one of these international fellows, that's literal. he owns coffee plantations in el salvador and his family is among its ruling elite for at least a couple of generations.

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Thu Feb 14, 2013, 07:14 AM

5. Seems to me the good thing about US public education is...

that it would be hard for it to get much worse. So there is plenty of room for improvement.

Are any and all attempts to "reform" education the manipulation of the global elite and designed to force people into becoming slaves to the rich?

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Response to Bonobo (Reply #5)

Thu Feb 14, 2013, 07:24 AM

8. first, your comment about public education is ignorant. second, yes, historically, whenever

 

corporate america decided to reform education, it was always for their own ends. to train workers to work in whatever manner they deemed fit, in whatever organizational style they deemed fit, with whatever mindset they deemed fit.

please *read* the op, not just the headline.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #8)

Thu Feb 14, 2013, 07:25 AM

9. Do the statistics lie? The ones that show where the US stands vs. the world? nt

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Response to Bonobo (Reply #9)

Thu Feb 14, 2013, 07:35 AM

11. Statistics can be made to show anything.

Here's a non-statistical fact: some of the countries that appear to be out performing us wanted to emulate our public education system BEFORE reform kicked in.

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Response to Bonobo (Reply #9)

Thu Feb 14, 2013, 08:02 AM

13. yes, they lie.

 

for example, here's a headline about those international tests:

Top Test Scores From Shanghai Stun Educators

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/07/education/07education.html?pagewanted=all

the article neglects to mention some basic facts:

1. shanghai is a city
2. shanghai is the richest city in china
3. only 35% of chinese students even *enter* high school, let alone complete it
http://factsanddetails.com/china.php?itemid=338
4. shanghai's schools are elite schools, e.g:

"Yes, there are many minorities, but they are more or less nonexistent in the schooling systems of Shanghai thanks to strict "hukou" regulations - basically visas preventing people from one region of China from getting benefits in another region of China. There has been much debate about the hukou v. the education system here, since migrant workers (people coming in from other provinces to find jobs in the city) can't get their children into regular Shanghai schools. What results is a mass segregation of Shanghai Han v. anybody else. Classrooms here ARE homogeneous. And since getting into high school requires testing, by age 15, they're not just homogeneous in culture and race, but also homogeneous in terms of how much time and money parents had to spend on after school tutoring sessions."

http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com/2011/01/be-like-shanghai-sorry-mike.html

In every country in the world, school performance mirrors class standing: poor students do worse than middle-class ones, middle-class ones do worse than rich ones, on average.

And the US has a higher percentage of students living in poverty than any other developed country -- significantly higher.

This makes all comparisons of *average* scores in those international tests deceptive (let alone other deceptive points, like comparing a selective group of chinese to a cross-section of americans)

http://news.stanford.edu/news/2013/january/test-scores-ranking-011513.html

http://hechingerreport.org/content/report-disadvantaged-students-in-u-s-gaining-on-international-peers_10866/

when scores of international students are compared to scores of americans students in public schools with the same percent of poverty, scores are comparable.

Free and Reduced Meal Rate + PISA Score

Schools with < 10% = 551

Schools with 10-24.9% = 527

Schools with 25-49.9% = 502

Schools with 49.9-74.9% = 471

Schools with >75% = 446

U.S. average = 500

OECD average = 493

http://nasspblogs.org/principaldifference/2010/12/pisa_its_poverty_not_stupid_1.html


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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #13)

Thu Feb 14, 2013, 02:57 PM

14. k

 

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Thu Feb 14, 2013, 07:17 AM

6. They are busy turning our education systems into Pakistan, or most of Africa

where the majority of education is BAD and privatized.

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Thu Feb 14, 2013, 07:20 AM

7. du rec. nt

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Thu Feb 14, 2013, 07:31 AM

10. schools of the future....



teachers of the future

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Thu Feb 14, 2013, 07:44 AM

12. Just my opinion, but the ultimate goal of US corporations is to....

....reduce wages of American workers to well below minimum wage to enable the corporations to "be more competitive" in the global marketplace thereby increasing their profits to even more obscene levels.

Part of that process is to make it very difficult for kids to go to college by ensuring that tuition is raised well beyond the ability of any child in the Lower 98% to pay. Only the wealthy will be able to send their children to college.

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Response to OldDem2012 (Reply #12)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 02:19 AM

15. agreed

 

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Response to OldDem2012 (Reply #12)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 11:41 PM

18. Try high school being out of reach

Many students in the third world countries don't have education much beyond the seventh grade.

That's where we are headed because the neolibs believe education is a waste of money and resources.

Of course such a system cannot be sustained, for if nobody has money to buy anything, there won't be any way for corporations and the financial elites to make more money.

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Response to OldDem2012 (Reply #12)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 11:41 PM

19. It's not just education being out of reach, so is housing so you can never buy a home. n/t

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Response to OldDem2012 (Reply #12)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 12:28 AM

20. The goal is to make profit, getting rid of teachers is one way to achieve that goal.

Fortunately it will backfire as the current institution of education was set up by Carnegie, Rockefeller, Ford, J. P. Morgan and Frederick W. Taylor, designed specifically to make worker drones out of children and force them into a mode of capitalist consumerism.

Digital learning does not necessarily feed that mode of propaganda because students are allowed to move at their own pace and learn outside of the hierarchical classroom model. Of course, I don't see the primary education providers actually resulting in blowback, but rather open course ware and the like should actually bring about a real sea change in how education is done.

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 07:36 AM

16. kick

 

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 11:29 PM

17. k

 

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 10:07 AM

21. K&R

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Sun Feb 17, 2013, 10:58 AM

22. kick

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