HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » Is it a bird? Is it a pla...
Introducing Discussionist: A new forum by the creators of DU

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 05:46 PM

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's a squid (or a suspect to the LAPD...)

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's a squid



A species of oceanic squid can fly more than 30 metres through the air at speeds faster than Usain Bolt if it wants to escape predators, Japanese researchers said.

The Neon Flying Squid propels itself out of the ocean by shooting a jet of water at high pressure, before opening its fins to glide at up to 11.2 metres per second, Jun Yamamoto of Hokkaido University said.

Olympic Gold medallist Bolt averaged 10.31 metres a second when he won at the London Games last year.

"There were always witnesses and rumours that said squid were seen flying, but no one had clarified how they actually do it. We have proved that it really is true," Yamamoto told AFP.

Researchers say is the first time anyone has ever described the mechanism the flying mollusc employs.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10864662

7 replies, 752 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 7 replies Author Time Post
Reply Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's a squid (or a suspect to the LAPD...) (Original post)
The Straight Story Feb 2013 OP
JaneyVee Feb 2013 #1
NYC_SKP Feb 2013 #2
JaneyVee Feb 2013 #4
DainBramaged Feb 2013 #3
wtmusic Feb 2013 #5
Bigmack Feb 2013 #6
NV Whino Feb 2013 #7

Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 05:52 PM

1. Wow. Over 100 ft. through the air. Someone has to update its Wiki page.

From Wikipedia:

Biologists, however, still do not fully understand the exact mechanisms by which the squid become airborne. Nevertheless, the phenomenon is known to happen quite frequently and at least one photographic evidence of Ommastrephes bartramii in flight exists.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to JaneyVee (Reply #1)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 05:59 PM

2. Nice, but flying fish can do 1,300 feet!

From Wikipedia:

Flight measurements

In May 2008, a Japanese television crew (NHK) filmed a flying fish (dubbed "Icarfish") off the coast of Yakushima Island, Japan. The creature spent 45 seconds in flight. The previous record was 42 seconds.

Flying fish can use updrafts at the leading edge of waves to cover distances of at least 400 m (1,300 ft). They can travel at speeds of more than 70 kilometres per hour (43 mph). Maximum altitude is 6 m (20 ft) above the surface of the sea. Some accounts have them landing on ships' decks.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_fish






..

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to NYC_SKP (Reply #2)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 06:07 PM

4. WHAAAT. That is astounding. That must be a transitional species on the evolutionary chain. In about

100,000 years I can totally see that fish being full bird.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 06:01 PM

3. I hear ride of the Valkyries in my ear worm just about now

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 06:20 PM

5. Wonder if they make good pets? nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to wtmusic (Reply #5)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 07:20 PM

6. ... or good calamari? nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bigmack (Reply #6)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 08:15 PM

7. Yes, but you get high after eating them.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread