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Sun Feb 10, 2013, 11:37 AM

LIBOR scandal: 'This goes much, much higher than me,' says trader at center of probe...

by Harry Wilson, Banking Editor
The Telegraph, Feb. 8, 2013

Tom Hayes, the trader at the centre of the Libor-rigging scandal, has warned that the conspiracy to manipulate key global borrowing rates could implicate senior bank executives.

In a text message to the Wall Street Journal, Tom Hayes, the former senior trader charged by the US Department of Justice in connection with interest rate-rigging said: “This goes much, much higher than me.”

Mr Hayes, a former UBS trader, was arrested by British police in December in connection with a UK criminal investigation into Libor manipulation, but has not been charged.

Jennifer Arcuri, described by the Wall Street Journal as a close friend of Mr Hayes, defended him saying he believed he was “innocent” and intended to implicate his seniors in the scandal. “He had no idea this was going to come back at him,” she told the newspaper.

She added that Libor-rigging “was a common industry practice”, saying: “It was like spanking children in the ‘70s – it wasn’t bad.”

CONTINUED...

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/libor-scandal/9857118/Libor-scandal-This-goes-much-much-higher-than-me-says-trader-Tom-Hayes-at-centre-of-probe.html

This seems to have dropped off the Corporate McPravda radar for some warmongering, tax dodging, middle class penuring reasons.

30 replies, 1985 views

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Reply LIBOR scandal: 'This goes much, much higher than me,' says trader at center of probe... (Original post)
Octafish Feb 2013 OP
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #1
DogPawsBiscuitsNGrav Feb 2013 #2
Junkdrawer Feb 2013 #3
Egalitarian Thug Feb 2013 #19
Octafish Feb 2013 #6
hootinholler Feb 2013 #7
The Magistrate Feb 2013 #18
rhett o rick Feb 2013 #24
FarCenter Feb 2013 #4
Octafish Feb 2013 #8
Egalitarian Thug Feb 2013 #20
woo me with science Feb 2013 #5
Octafish Feb 2013 #9
woo me with science Feb 2013 #27
WinkyDink Feb 2013 #10
Octafish Feb 2013 #11
WinkyDink Feb 2013 #12
Octafish Feb 2013 #13
WinkyDink Feb 2013 #21
upi402 Feb 2013 #16
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #22
sibelian Feb 2013 #14
Octafish Feb 2013 #28
sibelian Feb 2013 #29
upi402 Feb 2013 #15
lonestarnot Feb 2013 #17
WillyT Feb 2013 #23
Amonester Feb 2013 #25
hay rick Feb 2013 #26
Waiting For Everyman Feb 2013 #30

Response to Octafish (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 11:46 AM

1. You Know, Sir, These People Are Going To Force Their Own Prosecution...

The thing is simply so blatant, and so clearly directed from the offices of the highest chieftains, that the hands of governments will simply be forced to act, if only from reasons of the self-respect of officials in position to do so, let alone because of popular clamor reaching deafening heights....

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Response to The Magistrate (Reply #1)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 11:52 AM

2. If this were Iceland yes. In America there won't be any deafening heights because sports and

 

Pawn Stars are far more important to us than our children's future. With all of the great TV we simply don't have time to participate in mass protest.

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Response to The Magistrate (Reply #1)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 11:53 AM

3. I think it was part of a plan to help the Big Banks "earn" their way....

out of their toxic asset crisis.

It was a two part deal:

1.) Allow the banks to keep the toxic assets on the books at face value (not mark-to-market).

2.) With LIBOR and cheap money, they over leveraged their remaining assets on "bets" they knew the would win.

Guess it worked. Hopefully the money was taken from the hedge fund guys.

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Response to Junkdrawer (Reply #3)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 02:57 PM

19. Except that this has been going on since long before the collapse. This is an industry of thieves

 

and has been much longer than we've been a nation.

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Response to The Magistrate (Reply #1)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 12:20 PM

6. Here's to raising the needed popular clamor, Sir...

Picking Our Pockets and Lining Theirs

Banksters Take Us to the Brink

by BILL MOYERS and MICHAEL WINSHIP
CounterPunch
Weekend Edition July 13-15, 2012

EXCERPT...

And what a business! You’ve most likely been hearing about the newest scandal in banking, centering on Barclays Bank in Great Britain and something called Libor. That stands for London Interbank Offered Rate and involves a group of bankers who set a daily interest rate affecting trillions of dollars of transactions around the world. Your home mortgage, your college debt, your credit card fees; all of these could have been affected by Libor.

Now you would think the rates would be set by market forces, right? Aren’t they what makes the world go ‘round? But it turns out some of those insiders were manipulating the index for their own gain, to make their banks look better off during the financial crisis, lower their borrowing costs, and raise their profits – by cheating. Picking our pockets and lining theirs.

SNIP...

“In testimony last week before the British Parliament, former Barclays chief executive Robert E. Diamond said the bank had repeatedly brought to the attention of U.S. regulators — as well as U.K. regulators — the problems that the bank was experiencing in the Libor market.

“He said the bank’s warnings to regulators that Libor was artificially low did not lead to action. Barclays’ regulator in the United States is the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, which was run at the time by current Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner.”

CONTINUED...

http://www.counterpunch.org/2012/07/13/banksters-take-us-to-the-brink/

"It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it." - Upton Sinclair


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Response to The Magistrate (Reply #1)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 12:29 PM

7. You sir have a much higher opinion of the DOJ than I

My hope lies in an European state prosecuting as I have zero confidence in our DOJ's inclination to pursue high crime by those in high places (other than state legal cannabis issues, so to speak).

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Response to hootinholler (Reply #7)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 02:52 PM

18. I Agree Prosecution In Europe Is Far More Likely That Prosecution Here, Sir

But as the thing keeps piling higher and higher, it becomes harder and harder to avoid the necessity for prosecution pour encourager les autres/

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Response to The Magistrate (Reply #1)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 05:59 PM

24. I must disagree with greatest respect.

It is very rare that the generals are held accountable regardless of how blatant.

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Response to Octafish (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 11:56 AM

4. The interest rates should be rigged by official quasi-governmental action, like in the United States

Rigging the interest rates by having underlings of the Bank of England and the Chancellor of the Exchequer go wink-wink, nudge-nudge to middling managers of banks who then submit rates to a banking industry trade association seems like a very poor way of managing the economy.

It is much better to have the Federal Reserve manipulate rates through open-market operations by the New York Federal Reserve Bank.

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Response to FarCenter (Reply #4)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 12:42 PM

8. Regulate, rather than rig, The Fed, per Eliot Spitzer...

The Fed and its hidden hand need monitoring...



Libor Scandal: Why the N.Y. Fed Must Be Investigated

By Eliot Spitzer
Slate.com
Posted Monday, July 16, 2012, at 10:39 PM ET

EXCERPT...

The New York Federal Reserve knew about Libor games being played by the banks years ago and seems to have done precious little about it—except perhaps send a memo parroting the so-called reform ideas proposed by the banks themselves. Then nothing more. No prosecutions, no inquiries of the banks to see if the illegal behavior had stopped—just a live-and-let-live attitude.

Of course, this was the New York Fed led by Tim Geithner—who testified at his confirmation hearings to be treasury secretary that he had never been a regulator. Huh? As president of the N.Y. Fed, he was the most important regulator out there, and he didn't even know it?

SNIP...

Meanwhile, Hank Greenberg of AIG and John Whitehead of Goldman Sachs--these companies that got bailed out—were on the NY Fed committee that made Tim Geithner their president.

Was there a similar conflict of interest when the New York Fed apparently did nothing adequate about the Libor games? Well, look who was on the board: Dick Fuld of Lehman fame; Sandy Weill of Citibank; Jeff Immelt of GE—the largest beneficiary of the Fed's commercial paper guarantees; and, of course, Jamie Dimon of JPMorgan Chase, whose bank's London derivative trades and Libor involvement make his role on the board even more absurd.

CONTINUED...

http://www.slate.com/blogs/spitzer/2012/07/16/libor_scandal_why_the_new_york_fed_must_be_investigated_.html



For decades now, the Fed and its favored megabanks know no loyalty to paupers like me or, increasingly, depositors of middle class means. When did this change occur? IMFO, when Glass-Steagall was repealed and the taxpayers were put back in the equation to cover their losses. Criminal minds were then free to loot at will and without consequence.

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Response to Octafish (Reply #8)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 03:10 PM

20. Don't hold your breath on that Eliot Spitzer thing, my friend. n/t

 


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Response to Octafish (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 12:16 PM

5. K&R

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Response to woo me with science (Reply #5)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 12:52 PM

9. UBS is where deregulator extraordinaire Phil Gramm landed...

...as Vice Chairman, post his fine for the rich Senate career.

Gee. The SWISS bank got $183 Billion in U.S. taxpayer bailout dollars. What a coincidence.



UBS was one of eight large investment banks that benefited from the now-infamous backdoor bailout of AIG—resulting in government cash infusions totaling $182.5 billion—in the dark days of September 2008. At the hearing, the Special Inspector General for the Troubled Asset Relief Program, Neil Barofsky, revealed to the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee that UBS was the only bank willing to settle its soured credit default swaps (CDS) contracts for less than their face value. Why did UBS play ball when all the other banks didn't? As the Washington Independent reported, "Barofsky speculated that the firm probably simply recognized that the American taxpayers 'had taken the global economy on its back.'"

The financial crisis has proved time and again, big banks don't account for taxpayers—except when they need their help. And that's the more likely explanation for UBS' good behavior during the AIG rescue. Like the rest of the global financial industry, UBS was hurting from the subprime mortgage meltdown. (The bank's colossally bad bet on the US housing market—it had already written down $38 billion in bad loans as of April 2008—earned UBS the nickname Used to Be Smart.) But unlike its intransigent peers on Wall Street, the Swiss banking giant also faced the mounting threat of a US federal investigation. It was in no position to play hardball.

SOURCE:

http://m.motherjones.com/mojo/2010/01/ubs-good-bank-aig-bailout



Can't wait for Detroit schools, for instance, to get a bailout. Amongst others.

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Response to Octafish (Reply #9)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 08:08 PM

27. +1

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Response to WinkyDink (Reply #10)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 01:35 PM

11. Heartbreaking. I once believed such things impossible...

Then things became too obvious to ignore. We need to re-set the program.



Baron de Rothschild and Prescott Bush, sharing a moment and a bit o' information in this small world, back in the day...



Rothschild and Freshfields founders’ had links to slavery, papers reveal

By Carola Hoyos
Financial Times

Two of the biggest names in the City of London had previously undisclosed links to slavery in the British colonies, documents seen by the Financial Times have revealed.

Nathan Mayer Rothschild, the banking family’s 19th-century patriarch, and James William Freshfield, founder of Freshfields, the top City law firm, benefited financially from slavery, records from the National Archives show, even though both have often been portrayed as opponents of slavery.

Far from being a matter of distant history, slavery remains a highly contentious issue in the US, where Rothschild and Freshfields are both active.

Companies alleged to have links to past slave injustices have come under pressure to make restitution.

JPMorgan, the investment bank, set up a $5m scholarship fund for black students studying in Louisiana after apologising in 2005 for the company’s historic links to slavery.

CONTINUED (with registration, etc) ...

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/7c0f5014-628c-11de-b1c9-00144feabdc0.html



What used to be "conspiracy theory" evolves to "the way it is."

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Response to Octafish (Reply #11)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 01:51 PM

12. Those of us trying to move UPWARD have difficulty in seeing/accepting the tentacles of those

who have BEEN on top and want to MAINTAIN their position.

That is to say, history is in the forgotten past only for those of us who never benefitted by it. The ultra-wealthy and powerful families---the Rothschilds, Bushes (and Pierces: Barbara has hers, too), Rockefellers, Harrimans, etc.---from this, that, or the other banking, oil, steel, munitions, shipping, etc. companies still meet to decide the world's fate (economic, martial, population-health, and so on). They will brook NO opposition.

Nation-states as well as individual humans are as nothing to these global racketeers.

I have one term for those who think I wear my tin-foil hat too tightly: BCCE.

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Response to WinkyDink (Reply #12)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 02:24 PM

13. BCCI

The Rosetta Stone...

http://election.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&address=389x5446102

Helps explain why the banksters and warmongers don't go to jail, just like the multi-generational traitors and war criminals for whom they "work."

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Response to Octafish (Reply #13)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 03:14 PM

21. Heh, yes. BCCI. I confused it with the evil Bush Empire!

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Response to Octafish (Reply #11)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 02:33 PM

16. ..and we're supposed to shug shoulders

and be accused of behaving like spoiled children asking for ponies too

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Response to Octafish (Reply #11)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 03:23 PM

22. every bank or insurance co in existence during slavery times profited from it. and if you dig

 

into the histories of long-lived family dynasties you'll find that the majority of them profited from it too.

for example, bush & kerry ancestors both did.

this is one of the reasons the 'white privilege' narrative kind of reeks. It 'disappears' those who promulgated slavery as an *institution* & profited immensely from it & instead assigns collective guilt to ordinary schlubs most of whom didn't own slaves, didn't traffic in slaves, and never profited from the institution of slavery except by being able to feel superior to someone and have a job working for the capitalists who *did* profit.

The industrial revolution in america was financed with profits derived from slavery, and the descendants of those people = a lot of today's ruling class.

Most white americans, otoh, are descended from people who came here after the civil war. they may have profited in some minor way from jim crow, but not really, as the real effect was to hold wages down for everybody. You can see this most clearly in the south, which has historically had lower wages and less protection for labor than the north.

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Response to Octafish (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 02:28 PM

14. I'm getting bored of this perpetual Ominous Foreshadowing.


Very Bored.

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Response to sibelian (Reply #14)

Mon Feb 11, 2013, 11:35 AM

28. The Libor Scandal and Capitalism's Moral Decay

It would be nice if all the Banksters were rounded up and imprisoned. Until then, let's name as many as we can to make the job easier for the Department of Justice whenever they find the time to go after the people who pretty much destroyed the middle class.



The Libor Scandal and Capitalism's Moral Decay

The scandal engulfing the financial industry is yet another sign that our business leaders no longer respect the rule of law.

David Rohde
The Atlantic 18 JUL 13 2012, 2:45 PM ET 211

Maybe the acronym at the heart of the scandal is too confusing. Or Americans are simply tired of hearing about greedy bankers. By any measure, though, the Libor bank scandal is an extraordinary example of the 1 percent stealing from the 99 percent - and our crumbling ethics.

If an organized crime group was accused of breaking into the Nassau County Treasurer's Office on New York's Long Island and stealing $13 million, outrage would be widespread. And if the same group was accused of stealing millions from the City of Baltimore and other struggling municipalities, they would emerge as an issue in the presidential campaign.

Instead, the Libor scandal is emerging in dribs and drabs and drawing little public attention. The middle class is being victimized, and there is little protest.

Last month, the British bank Barclays agreed to pay $453 million to American and British authorities to settle allegations that it manipulated key interest rates for profit between 2005 and 2009, specifically the London Interbank Offered Rate, or Libor. American and British investigators are now examining whether traders at a dozen other banks -- including the "too-big-to-fail" U.S. banks JPMorgan, Citibank and Bank of America -- also manipulated rates.

It is hard to overstate the impact of the Libor benchmark, which is used to value some $360 trillion in loans and financial contracts worldwide. It affects lending to governments, businesses and consumers, and even student loan and credit card rates.

CONTINUED...



Gee. So that's what happened to future!

Hope this didn't bore you.

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Response to Octafish (Reply #28)

Mon Feb 11, 2013, 01:41 PM

29. Yeah, yeah, I know. I get it.


I'm just getting fed up of the slithery gits constantly getting away with it. I want the end of season finale where the good guy finaly gets them, already.

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Response to Octafish (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 02:30 PM

15. k/r

Very useful OP as per typical.

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Response to Octafish (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 02:44 PM

17. K & R!

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Response to Octafish (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 05:45 PM

23. K & R !!!


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Response to Octafish (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 06:33 PM

25. “It was like spanking children in the ‘70s – it wasn’t bad.”

Like "spanking the poor repeatedly, and laughing about them getting poorer everyday because they're a bunch of loser takers" is not "bad" today???



2045, Smells Like Venus

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Response to Octafish (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 07:42 PM

26. You say massive fraud, I say Beyonce.

K&R for this very important story.

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Response to Octafish (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2013, 01:50 PM

30. More institionalized crime by the banks.

Of course adjustable mortgage rates were set by London Libor (for the most part), so millions of homeowners were ripped off by this each month. You'd think that alone would cause enough people to be interested in this.

Thanks, Octafish, K&R.

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